Talking content and CX with Nico Prins, consultant for Fortune 500 companies

February 21, 2020
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Joe:

00:00

welcome to the DNA  and experience podcast from cloud app where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Hey, everyone, I am so excited to have ah Nico as a guest this morning with me or this afternoon. Actually, Nico has been, um him and I have been talking for the last few weeks a lot about content and customer experience. And so I I off asked him to come join me and talk through some of the things he's done with consulting with a lot of Fortune 500 companies and helping them kind of create their path with content. Leading to customer experience and also just kind of some of the things that he might see, you know, forthcoming with the modern workplace and how we can kind of as companies do a better job at reaching our customers. So, Nico, I'll give you a minute to introduce yourself, and then we'll kind of go through some questions and kind of see where the discussion goes.

Nico:

01:09

Perfect Yeah, thank you very much for having me.  You gave  a pretty good overview of my background. So I spend more or less half my week working for S E R. Agency based in the UK on we're doing a little work we'd kind of like Hence boys level and larger Alexis Cos predominantly on down on the side of the eye or city personal consulting as well. It's more or less, sir. A quick snapshot of May. A lot of the work's coming, like, focused on on the customer experience and how to house optimized and improve the customer experience and create constantly kind of like aligns with the interests of the customers. Likely tell.

Joe:

01:56

Very cool. You know, we live in a world full of distraction. There's so much content out there, so much availability. And people are getting hit with notifications from Slack and Linked in and Twitter and Facebook and, uh, email. What's away? That ah brand can kind of cut through that noise.

Nico:

02:15

So I think locate him. An important element of that really is to It's kind of like define what is your your favorite channel, right? Because for most companies on does there are so many channels are those a CZ you kind of like brightly mentions. But for most companies ever kind of like this idea when the head of on the channel communication of coming, like being out to be on every single channel and provide the best experience across every single channel? But the reality is, I think, for most companies is that they they don't have that kind of like. The resource is, I guess, for the majority of companies to provide that amazing experience. Of course, all channel says coming like to focus instead on on what are your what, your favorite channels and then provide the best experience for your customers across that. Because that's really so. Tomorrow is the engagement is really what you're gonna, you know, improve the customer experience as well.

Joe:

03:13

It's kind of like dig in a little bit deeper on that. What, you know, with so many  Channel opportunities,  what people really want? What's the DNA of, ah, good customer experience

Nico:

03:26

I think the DNA of a good customer experience. It's kind of like first, you really need to define what you're kind of like brand promises, right? Right. What do you want to deliver. And what What can you realistically delivered your customers and on wants be laying for and have that kind of like clearly, you know, clearly outlined for yourself and for the for the company as a whole on Deacon. Then build on that kind of like that core messaging that hope you hopefully over Stephen can deliver on. And then it's a case of really provoked, like educating hands, illustrating the body that you can provide the your customers. I'm going across there across the different channels and kind of like greatness smooth on boarding and then engagement.

Joe:

04:16

Yeah, I like how you started with you know, cos strategy. It's it's that can be driven. Definitely buy a customer feedback and other things that kind of creates. What you want to be is a brand, But you also need to no, start with that. Who do we want to be now? Who do you want to be five years from now? How is our messaging going to reflect that? And how can we kind of use that to motivate our customers to stay loyal or or start in the first place and inspire, you know, initial customers will his retention?

Nico:

04:50

Yeah. Yeah, and I definitely couldn't agree more.

Joe:

04:54

How can you? You know, we're kind of content has expanded into lots of different aspects of things. How? How could you think videos and visuals and trying to connect outside of text? And can really help connect you with your customer.

Nico:

05:12

I think videos incredibly important, especially its part, the boarding process. A lot more important than text just because of the amount of data that you can even provide right. Like if we were having this, this conversation is as an email sequence. Then that would be, you know, we'd be ordered on the 50th email backwards and forwards. Um, and so it's that the ability to convey information quickly on officially is is a huge advantage of video, obviously, but it's also had put also that engagement as well. Because you're creating a personal engagement, is you is you interact by by video, which is something that you you you didn't get to a degree with text, but you don't get us quickly unless disability toe, you know, so basically represent your your ground three video is in your You're connecting with an individual often, um is very, very powerful, which is kind of like and when you consider and just a marketing really like one of the most effective sales channels. Is his Web, our webinars? And it's kind of understandable because through a weapon, or you haven't on our face time with someone in, You know, that's ideally what you want. So what you tried to do offline if you're trying to sell oh, educated is it's together face time that want to one face time with a person on that that creates opportunities to educate, inform and provide body.

Joe:

06:42

Yes, it's interesting how we've kind of moved into this like videoconferencing is kind of the standard now, Uh, no tools like cloud app provides, like the asynchronous communication. Like you said, like yesterday I was. Instead of typing out a massively long email, I was recording my screen and recording me talking to my screen of how I wanted a designer to do a certain thing on the landing page. And, yeah, it was all about time. But also about that connection point. And those types of things could be really valuable not just for your external brand and connecting with customers, but also like internal brand And how you're working with other people on your team.

Nico:

07:27

Yeah, Yeah, I completely I mean, I work so I work is part of it. Distributes workforce. I guess I'm the Ashley. The any person that's this distributed in our company. Uh, say that ability toe, you know, it's a connect. Well, videos is really important. It's part of just the day to day processes of working because it maintains up that engagement with with the person which, when he you know, if you there's a miscommunication or something like that, which can happen quite easily, just kind of being up to just jump on a on a cool and just deal with something very quickly can help a was over problem that will say becoming like, you know, yeah. So the problem faster, I guess, is also

Joe:

08:10

Yeah, we did this. Ah, we did this survey of, like, 1000 U. S. Office workers last year, and we found that no more than 50% of people said they would communicate more have done visually, but also people still prefer that, like, in person communication. Um, so it's interesting that, you know, we're all still human. We still need that, like face to face communication. Now we need that connection and feel like we're, you know, on the side of something together. So it's interesting how you talk about kind of video and visuals helping to benefit that.

Nico:

08:47

Yeah,  very important

Joe:

08:50

when you're consulting. You have a little bit different kind of agency consulting background the night than I normally kind of talk with. So your customer is kind of, you know, distributed. It's it's lots of different cos they're all kind of no agency life asking Everything needs to be done like yesterday, and everything needs to have lots of results. And I'm sure there's lots of complaints and more so than gratitude. So um, how do you kind of go about creating experience for your customers in that sense? And what have you been able to find is a repeatable way to to do that?

Nico:

09:31

So, I mean, some of the some of the fundamentals are very similar process, in my opinion, because part of it is the is the on boarding process. So it's kind of like how do you create a really smooth on boarding process? And for agencies that well, the fundamentals of very similar it tends to be more than or flying process. It's kind of like how g Yeah. How'd you get from the sales meeting? Howdy. Do create the engagement through sales meeting and enjoyed achieved the outcome that you're looking for, which is tell us the land.  Uh, but then you know the components of that kind of like going your expenses showing why you're the best personal, you know in the sassy equipment would be the best tool for the job. What the features are that you are for eternal life and trying to provide that that experience, which is, which is your expertise, which was becoming like something similar to demo or senator. That's it's kind of that whole prices well, different is it's very similar. Um, and so it's really yes, really clear. Focus on the customer on understanding what that pain points are likely to be on understanding what you're what you're brand promises on damp to convey that officially supposed to your best investigate that you come essentially.

Joe:

10:53

It's really good. I like how you kind of tied it back to, you know, brand strategy and really just being, uh, focused on what you want to deliver and kind of really no doubling down on that with creating that experience.

Nico:

11:09

Yeah, yeah, yeah. And then then then I guess the ongoing part, which is similar wrist, this is the kind of retention about is obviously with us. You've got touring, you're trying to keep them in the tour, and hopefully they just do that without any kind of problems. But then you have there. That's alongside which you kind of like you. You know your weapon. Also, your email sequences where you're sending us out where you're trying to kind of, like, maintain the engagement. And for us, it would be the the regular meetings right there. The ability to do this video chats toe. No, I need to touch base to discuss the project, but also to kind of, like, maintain a friendship alongside. And there's kind of like, yeah, it's important, regardless of what needs you operating. And nothing that that's very important.

Joe:

11:59

Yeah, yeah, I agree. You know, you're you're also a customer on your own. On so own side. You're buying tools. You're buying clothes online. You're buying lots of stuff is a consumer. What's a recent experience you've had as a customer yourself? That has kind of made you more loyal, made you more connected to a brand.

Nico:

12:24

Say so you gave me the questions before. I'm obviously before this. I know it's been quite a quite a long think about it and say, And I was struggling to come up with, like, one very stand out, kind of like fact, especially for a brand by recently. So this is not something is going to keep me retained toe the company. I recently visited Petra and say, I like I've got most people that the visit Petra was just kind of like a place in Jordan. Yeah, what do you say for like, say, three days and we gets to a restaurant on the first night and say, Nice service, nice food or the rest of that kind of stuff cuts the end, got to the bill and the guy was like, No, no, no, no, no. You're not allowed to leave now. Let me give you dessert in a cup of tea and say, Certainly Kaposi's criminal so very, very friendly and engaging kind of like that that desire to provide extra value on Dhe, then to try and pull us in for the next day. And he was kind of like, Oh, and by the way, if you come back the next day, we'll give you 10% off and he's got this very kind of, like, smooth sail sequence that doesn't foretell contrived, which I think is very important for customer loyalty, because obviously people there let me cynical. But they kind of like, appreciate about you, right? I'm saying this very smooth sail sequence that kind of like drew us back for the next day, right? Um and that was that was kind of like a standout thing. I thought when I was was considering a question

Joe:

13:59

that's cool. That's that's the unique experience. Um, and it it kind of points to like, even if you've gotta have it along the whole sequence, like if the food was terrible, you even if the service was amazing and they gave you a discount, you wouldn't have gone back, you know? So it's got like, the product has to be good, but then you've also got to provide that, you know, extra experience, and then like that reason to come back.

Nico:

14:27

Yeah, yeah, exactly. Exactly. And it's very like simple cell sequence that he has, but I think it's I can see that being a very effective cell sequence mitts. It's kind of like what you do. I really look for from a company, right? Is that kind of ability toe. Now show your value. Shea show the extra value that you can bring because most companies operate in a very competitive marketplace and then howto helped pull people back in. Well, you never taken them essentially.

Joe:

14:55

So what do you think? You know, This has been a great conversation. We've gone down a lot of paths with strategy and other things. What do you think the future looks like? What What's your You know, if you look a TTE Nico Prince Crystal Ball, what is the future of experience business look like in the next 5 10 years?

Nico:

15:14

So, I mean, I think most t this two on board one's right one would be five Jean the what fight you brings to enough. That's just gonna transcend across most finishes in, you know, if a man's voice down toe Cosima something that would be a big change in in kind of a deal. Experience processes you playing together with states from different ports. Such points, Um, for the for me, that's more of an incremental thing because most of that souls are already out. That is just how you're combining with that information and providing a better experience, like almost like the all new tunnel. Boxing, I guess.

Joe:

15:58

Very cool.

Nico:

16:00

And then the second thing, which I think is it's going to be the bigger change point is really the virtual reality because we're starting, you know, it's like, almost like the eighties with the huge frames quite now. But 10 years from now, it's gonna be, you know, it's gonna be a big change in that thing. That's gonna be one of the bigger It gets. Weapons, I guess.

Joe:

16:20

Yes, that's a good point. I I you know, I worked at Adobe before Cloud app, and so I was kind of part of this customer experience business, narrative development from adobes perspective. Then I remember one of the coolest things I saw from V R. Was I think  they known outdoor retailer they were presenting at Adobe Summit. The conference and they showed, um, you know, like a virtual shopping experience and you could like you could actually like with the gloves and gauntlets they had on you could actually pick up the items like spin him around. Look out, Um, put him in your like virtual cart. Yeah, like, Yeah, it's because that's kind of what's been missing from online buying is kind of the touch and fuel and the satisfaction of that. So it's interesting that you brought that up?

Nico:

17:22

Yeah, yeah, No, I think it's giving a nice illustration of where that could, potentially where virtual reality could potentially take you. And I think that's it. It's just we're at such a the beginning points where it's not really people aren't really used to it and say once it gets to that stage like the options are gonna be, say, say very, I guess

Joe:

17:45

Very cool. Well, Nico, thank you so much for your time today. Lots of great insights from your opportunities, you know, consulting with a lot of Fortune 500 companies. Uh, lots of good stuff on customer experience, and we'll have to do this again soon.

Nico:

18:00

Yeah, and I thank you very much for your time. Appreciate.

Joe:

18:06

Thanks for joining the D. N A. Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create. For your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.