Talking content and experience with NFL content lead Joey Buskirk

December 18, 2019
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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. I am so excited to chat today with a guest. His name is Joey. He works with the NFL and Joey and I connected over Social. And I thought he had a really cool role and background and so I definitely wanted to bring him in to chat today about his experience and how it kind of plays out in digital and how you can kind of bring in a customer, uh, into your environment and creating experience for them and definitely have it lead to some loyalty. So Joey, why don't you give us a little quick background on yourself? And, um, then we'll go into some questions.

Joey:

01:02

Great. Thanks, Joe. I'm Joey as Joe mentioned. I work for the NFL as the manager of club content strategy, but ultimately I'm a league employee, but I worked with all 32 clubs on a daily basis on digital strategy as it pertains to  digital and social platforms so I really focus on long form video that you see on TV.  But over the years of social strategy, I see a lot of various things that have to do with how we can best optimize all of the club's platforms. So obviously working with 30 franchises, it is all very variable as how I approached the Bangles is gonna be different from how I approach Patriots. Just to name two examples. Yeah, that's a rundown of who I am. I mean, at the end of the day in telling the story through data is really what I focus on a daily basis.

Joe:

02:04

Yeah, I think that's kind of how a lot of people have moved in towards the directions and marketing is really kind of creating that connection point with content data.  I ran this survey on Twitter probably like, two months ago and I said if you could only have one, which would you have content or data. And the survey actually ended up 50 50, so I thought it was pretty interesting.  We live in a world full of distractions and slack notifications and email and social. How can you kind of cut through that as a brand and create that experience?

Joey:

02:53

Yeah, you kind of get there. But I heard we live in a world full of distractions, and I think that was one right there.

Joe:

03:00

But...

Joey:

03:02

Yeah, I mean, on the clubs and how they how they stand out. I think that a lot of folks are aware of their  social presence. And I think I want to sprinkle a few club examples into this because, uh, you know, I really think that that would make my points come across, you know, as best as I can. So I think that originality, that's something that is thrown out quite a bit. But a club staying true to their brand? Uh, well, you know, having a good time at the same time is huge, I think, showcasing player personalities. A lot of clubs do a phenomenal job, you know, really going behind the helmet to attract the casual fan. I

Joe:

03:50

think they were

Joey:

03:51

in a different position with, you know, with all the players having equipment on it's not that easy to to really see them and get to know them as it is with basketball players, for example. But really, going behind the helmet and looking at the personalities of all these well known players has really been drawing fans and especially ones that aren't necessarily, you know, massive football fans in the first place. One thing I wanted to be is authentic and truthful, I think something that really is thrown around quite a bit. I mean, I know that that's not new news for brands of all types, but for brands like the NFL in clubs in general. One example is the Browns, when they had one win a couple years ago,  they were honest with her fans. They took an approach where they weren't, you know, they weren't trying to make anything seem as it, you know, you know, pulling strings to making fans think something different. They were very, very straightforward in there. A little bit of self degradation, being honest with who they are, where they're at in, you know, with their but it's huge to really make fans feel like they can trust you. You know. And in that developing your voice, bringing in the human element. The Chargers do a phenomenal job on social. Doing your best, to develop your voice, developed your brand and stay true to who you are. And I think the clubs are doing a great jump like that.

Joe:

05:43

Great. That was really good answer. I like what you said about kind of bringing that unique, that unique experience, that really only you can provide for the consumer, which is, you know, that in game in, helmet miked up,  locker room stuff that people really want to see behind the scenes and kind of get the feel  of the team that they're cheering for. There's so much content and so many holes you can go down. How do you try and prioritize which things to show and which ones are working out?

Joey:

06:33

Yeah. I mean, I think that that's a good point, because obviously when it comes to a content execution. It's not necessarily gonna be. Everyone says content is king, and that's true. But it's the idea of content that's King. And what I mean by that is it's how you distribute that. Because how you  know how you take one specific content piece on distributed is how you're gonna really get fans to latch on. For example, if you're creating, if you and used example of McCaffrey running back for the Panthers because he's just months he had a great fantasy, but a long form piece that you did behind the scenes with him. Um, you're gonna you're gonna approach that differently when you're thinking of posting it to YouTube, as opposed to posting it to Twitter, posting it on Instagram stories. It's really about the avenue in which you get this content of fan. So you know, when I approach a piece of content, it's really looking at it. It's not a one size fits all, you know format anymore. It's kind of catering. It's a one too many approach. And so one thing that I stress quite a bit, you know, when working with clubs and they're all very, very well equipped and know this already. But it's work with, you know, they're  distributing content in the right way. 6 to 8 minute videos on YouTube as opposed to eclipse on Twitter things. Things of that nature

Joe:

08:09

Cool? Yes, we really kind of just find ways to slice and dice it based on the medium. You take that one long form piece and turn it into a blog post or report and have a YouTube video and some social pieces. You really get that content efficiency. Going with that? Like how? Convince Jewel's and video You mentioned YouTube and some other things. How can visuals and video in the day and age we have now really enhance or improve, um, content you're putting out?

Joey:

08:56

Yeah. So how video enhances the consumer experience. I mean, one thing I wanted to mention is if done right. You know, video and visual imagery  can really strike an emotional cord that's only achievable through that method. Um, you know, music, video, photo like those were the most popular pieces of constant content that are consumed, and it's because, you know it has the ability to really strike a chord in you  that's emotional. That's engaging. And we've seen, you know, as you're aware, Major. Well, maybe not, you know, across the board. But when it comes to the league and the clubs we've seen major year over year in pieces when it comes to, you know, video being consumed as opposed to photo and article on, and that just continues to grow. So visuals and video enhance. Of course, I think that sometimes quality, you know, if you can really create something of quality, like the Vikings, for example, I bring them up quite a bit because they create beautiful pieces of video very, very well done. I'm always  totally captivated by what they do. But then, on another, you know, sometimes things in its simplest form is just as effective when it comes to be a raw, uncut footage of, you know, a player grabbing your phone at the end of the game. We got that w on and then posting it straight to  your feed, while the feeling of excitement after a win, is still wrong. It's still real, you know. Again, it goes back to what I just mentioned before. It's catering to your audience, catering to the platform that you're posting that it's really taken advantage is it's not always about making beautiful as you want to make it. Sometimes it's, um, but then it's also about, you know, really capture that emotional aspect as well.

Joe:

10:56

Yeah, go into that. Maybe even a little bit more  like speed over quality, where you are specifically working with the clubs? And you know when you have in game action happening. Um, how do you kind of get something out there fast if people are like following it on Twitter or some other medium versus like, you know, having that quality piece kind of driving something?

Joey:

11:37

Yeah, that's a good question. I think that a big one is in game, right? So I feel like when it comes to Sundays or Mondays and Thursdays,  fans just want to know what's happening. It's  really about this. The social folks are on the field capturing whatever they can, whether it's the actual highlight or the celebrations surrounding the highlight everything. Pregame, postgame. But like I mentioned before that example of the Chargers, when it comes to the game, it's It's just that organic content that happens that you can't predict. I mean, that's usually you know, you want to get that up as quickly as possible to cause fans are literally sitting at home in a day and age where not everybody has cable there. And they're looking to their phones and Twitter and different social platforms to get their updates, not only updates but actual,  players and from the style and making them feel like they're a part of the game. So when it comes to, uh, you know, the longer  form pieces of content, the episodic pieces of content, those air over a long period of time, that those air incredibly popular and obviously very vital  to a club. But those were you know, we find a lot of training camp, episodic pieces or episodic, and what I mean by that is really high quality video that you, you know, of things, specifically a lot of stuff in season, but a lot of offseason content as well, when there's not as much happening, feel so again. It's clubs have different video teams in different capabilities, but I think it really goes down in season. There's a lot more of that speed, raw video. Let's just get it up, Let's go, let's  connect with fans .And then, uh, you know, I think for that for the rest of the week and on the off season when you have a little bit more time to fine tune.  But I guess it's all about balance of having both because fans want one.

Joe:

13:58

Yeah, that's that's really cool.  I mean, can you provide a structure to like, real time stuff, like I know when I was in like, a  war room for kind of like we're chatting a little bit before where when I was with Adobe, we put out this Super Bowl content, you know, that was referenced by a lot of top tier like press outlets. And so we were planning like to do this Realtor time review of commercials because our Super Bowl was very ad focused. So it was like, This is what people these are the ads people want to see and global. So it was kind of like I knew when the commercials were coming out, and so I had, like, my process to like respond and put date out there. Is there, like, a little bit of an editorial real time calendar where you're like, OK, if someone gets a touchdown, this is the process. Or someone gets, you know, a game changing highlight or wherever this the process? Or is it very much just like based on experience and less about kind of like a process?

Joey:

15:22

What I know from my experience. You know, I was just in London for a couple of the games at Wembley and, you know, over the years, you know, whether it's Super Bowl or whether it's going to the game.  I mean, I wish I can, you know, like, go into detail for you, But as somebody that works with all clubs  is more of a consultant to the clubs, you know, process with every day. So I think that although I'm aware of what happens in various front from club, sure, that's been my process. Whether you know, whether whether you're posting in real time and you have any any holes to jump through and you have sign off, you know, do right, this will all right, you have, You know, the powers that be that they want to have more of a checks and balances that's really on a club by club basis in order to, you know, really, really do what they feel is fast. So go to maybe that set that more of a

Joe:

16:28

Yeah, that makes sense. So outside like recent good experience you've had with a brand and you know, was if it was, like retail like, what was the process like, what made it stand out to you? Did it make you more of a loyal customer? What? What kind of experience you've had in your own life?

Joey:

16:53

Yeah, so I have, like, this is very basic.  But you know, yesterday  I ordered a baseball mitt from my nephew and a coloring book for my niece, and it was there within 16 hours. And the efficiency and the speed and what which Amazon used to deliver all for a relatively small fee once a year is incredible. I've had great experiences with them. When it comes on a different level, I'm a massive Lakers fan, huh? I just went to a game a week ago with couple of buddies and I was blown away by their game experience, you know? And of course I'm a bit biased, but I've been to a lot of live games and, uh, just just from the way that they you know how to containment set up to the lighting, to the temperature in the arena, to the customer service to the food. I mean, you pay a pretty penny, but this was just quite the experience, and they really I think that they're also so a lot more personal with how they keep hearing to people and fans in game. So they have an app that you can get. I don't agree. I went because I was, you know, wanted to focus on the game. Necessarily. Someday I had how it would work. But it's ultimately a game where you could really be involved in send real time photos and send updates and predictions so that you could, uh, you know, so you can stay in tune with what's happening and get them and then the late game make you went back for more. So, you know, I think one thing that I won't go into details about, but that we were, you know, a lot on with the clubs is in game experiences. You know? How do you personalize them? To make fans want to come because it's becoming. It's easier to sit on our coach or where, ever that maybe you could watch live  games on your breast, depending on where you are, you know, are watching what you know, coming up with different ways to get fans to want to actually go immerse themselves in the experience? That's that's a huge thing.  Some clubs have no problem selling tickets for years to come, and others you know about harder to think so. I just wanted to bring up the Lakers because  it really stood as a really awesome experience.

Joe:

19:36

Cool. Yeah, I and I agree with you. I think sports is in a unique situation where you may have a new person. Everything. Well, you will have a new person every game, right? You're not. You don't have the same people at every single game. And it could be that person's first time. Um, you know what? There is Ah, time we're growing up with, like, Michael Jordan. And obviously I'm in Utah. Some I'm a jazz guy with Karl Malone and John Stockton, but I remember Michael Jordan saying that  he tried to play for, like, the kid that came to see him play that had never seen an NBA game before. So it's not. It's on, like the player level where they, like, hopefully perform and aren't like sitting out a game. It's for load management or whatever, but it's also it's also on the teams, you know, to provide that experience like you said and really make it for people to come back. So I think that's that's a really interesting point.

Joey:

20:49

My company in 2016. I you know, uh, me and my wife went  to see owe me one last time and so that was kind of brutal, but yeah, I mean, it's totally feel what you're saying. It's yeah, no, making it a lot of So how do you get a big comeback?

Joe:

21:16

Awesome. Well, Joey, I think we could talk all day. It's been great having you on. Maybe we'll have to do it again soon and talk a little bit more. I hope everyone has a good Thanksgiving holiday and, uh, enjoy the rest of your week. Thanks, man. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time