5 keys to Creating a Demand Gen Report

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us behind the scenes of the State of Collaboration report. So we did this report called the State of Collaboration Q 3 2019. And I’ve been doing this quite a bit during these longer formed imagine pieces over the last decade or so with adobe and Cloud App. So I thought it would be cool. to, maybe share some of the tips I’ve learned long way of how to create those things so I created just five keys that I want to go over. Um, really kind of the start is hypothesizing and strategizing What type of piece of content you want to create. So with this State of Collaboration report that we created, I wanted to, you know, think about both selfishly, from a business perspective, what we could kind of gain from a survey on helping build our strategy from consumers. Um and then also just create some thought leadership, you know, collaboration is kind of a hot topic. Right now, it’s about a $16 billion industry. Leaders like Slack and Zoom are out there kind of creating waves. And so, uh, when I was putting together this survey, um, the questions all kind of tailored around what I really wanted to see in collaboration. So I put the questions together. There was around 10 of them and kind of hypothesized what I expected to see. So, um, the questions were anywhere from like, how do you prefer to collaborate with your co workers? How often are you working from home? Things like that around remote work in collaboration. And I was expecting to see, you know, a big growth and remote work eyes expecting to see some generational differences between baby boomers and Gen Z as an example. And I was expecting to see, um, certain things about how people are kind of using different tools in the modern workplace. And so that was kind of leading my hypothesis in these creating these questions on the survey. So then we send that survey and it was too 1000 U. S office workers ages 18 to 60. So you kind of set up your methodology, you know, If you want to just focus on one demographic, you can. I wanted to have kind of, ah, lot of differences and demographics to be able to see how things were separate and kind of See how Gen z specifically and millennials differed from Gen X and Baby Boomer. So we filled its survey and, um, the questions, you know, we’re all guilty of being around that hypothesis. And then you also kind of need to think about, uh what? The purpose of of what you’re doing is in the end. So my purpose again, I mentioned was to be able to have, um, be able to have results that could drive our strategy and then also results so we could kind of share for thought leadership and demand. Um, so I thought about those ahead of time and then have a, you know, a key theme or a purpose. So the key theme for me was collaboration remote work and pairing those two things together and really trying to find a happy medium of where we’re going in the future, work in modern workplace, then the fun part, the analyzing the data. So if you feel the survey through Qualtrics or Surveymonkey or, um, you know, any other survey service, they’re gonna kind of just give you back a dump of data. Um, and really, it’s up to you to kind of come up with something creative from it. So, uh, you know, whether you like to use pivot tables or sequel, um, or whatever kind of your tool choices. I was mostly in excel using pivot tables and kind of coming up with the results. Um, but the data, you know, that that comes back from those people wasn’t isn’t always the most exciting. So you need to kind of create a story with it. So, um, if you go to my report that I created, it’s on get cloud app dot com, Um, under R e book section, you’ll see that kind of I created kind of some key insights and story lines from it so bubbling up. You know, any time you can have a generational difference, it’s usually pretty exciting to share. So I found that the majority of Gen. Z works remotely each week. One in four office workers work from home at least half the time Gen Z office workers love slack most, and Gen Xers are actually all in on video, which was actually a little surprising. I would expected Jen’s ear millennials to be a little higher on video. More than one in two office workers say they would collaborate more done visually, with 60% of Gen Z and Millennials, so they would collaborate more done visually. And then 94. 94% of office workers said team collaboration is top priority for them. So those were kind of the story lines that I bubbled up. Um, the actual report has now 50 insights or so in it, and I bubbled up probably 6 to 10 of those to make it press worthy and a little more digestible. And then I also turned each of those six into, um, social share charts. So that’s kind of the next piece is created. Really, Um, I like to call it content efficiency, So you start with a really high level demand in piece on that feeds into some block posts. It feeds into some social Tibbetts feeds into demand Jen’s that you can do on different sources linked in, or Facebook or Google and generate leads from that and it’s really all from one piece of content. So, uh, love putting these, like, longer form demand in pieces together, my five keys again are kind of hypothesized the results that you wanted to see on that Hopefully, you know, some of your hypotheses match up with actual results. Um, create kind of the questions that you are hoping to see fit in with your hypothesis ahead of time and what you expect to see questions that feed into what you might expect, Uh, have your key themes have a central purpose. So, um, if someone’s doing your survey or you wanna have kind of a ski theme within that survey, analyze the data and then lastly, um, you know, make lots of pieces from that one kind of data analysis. So research is really fun too. It can produce a lot of great content and can have really long, uh, long reach and longevity as far as people referencing data. So, um, look to do demand in pieces longer, form pieces of content and definitely check out the collaboration report that I put together for Cloud App. Um, I’ll linked to it in the comments section, um of everything that I’m releasing this onto. So take a look at the collaboration report on. Hopefully that will kind of inspire you to lead some future research for your company in the future. Have a great day and we will talk soon. Thank you. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customers. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots, and Gifs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Reviewing stats around the Future of Work from the State of Collaboration report from CloudApp

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Hello, everyone. I am excited to go through the State of Collaboration report from Cloud App today. Um, I was hoping to be able to share my screen, but I’m just going to kind of share some of the stats and talk through that with you today. So we did a survey of 1000 U. S. Office workers aged 18 to 60 and we wanted to find out really what, um, people were feeling about collaboration about remote work and looks a generational differences and find out how they want to collaborate, how to create some tips to integrate into your business from these results. So some of the key insights is we found that majority of Gen. Z and Millennials are working remotely each week. That could be as little as once a week, half the time or full time. But there’s a lot of kind of emerging generations, um, that are now becoming a majority of the work force that are choosing to work from home, um, for various reasons, either there away from the mother ship and headquarters, and just live in a different location, choosing to live away from just crazy, expensive places like the Bay Area or New York, living a little further away from those places and maybe commuting in a couple of days a week but working from home and then also just flexibility. There’s a lot of focus on work, life, balance and mindfulness on wanting to be healthy and have a longer career. And so these groups are focusing on ways to do that by working from home occasionally, Um, and really trying to find that that that balance way also found that one in four office workers in general in the in the entire span is working from home at least half the time. So, um, you know, that brings up some interesting challenges when you’re going through remote work. And I’ve talked about a couple of times on these live broadcasts and also on a podcast called the DNA of an Experience about ways to engage with remote workers. There’s tools out there, like obviously, Zoom or Cloud app. Eyes ah, instant business communication tool that allows connection with remote workers through the creation of videos, screenshots and gifts. There’s tools like Air Table for Calendar uh, kind of shared calendar things. Asana for tasks, lots of different tools out there to enable you obviously slack as well. Which is another stat we looked at was Gen Z office workers love slack on Gen Xers are the ones who are all in on video. So the majority of those kind of groups they showed the highest year of visits to or affinity for those tools. So, um, that slack with the younger generation is kind of ah, really informal way to communicate incorporates Gifs and emojis in kind of a fun way, which is why it’s grasp onto them. And Gen Xers was actually a little surprising with how they were all in on video. I was expecting that to be maybe more millennial or gen z generations. Um, but Gen Xers have jumped in on video conferencing more than 12 Office workers say they would collaborate more done visually, So, uh, not just remote workers, but everyone in the office is looking for ways to connect differently and more visually. So lots of, um you old adages around pictures worth 1000 words. So what’s a video worth? These ways to communicate differently can really connect audiences in a faster, more efficient way. Um, I’ve loved using, uh, zoom to connect with, uh, people that I’ve managed both when I was with adobe and here at Cloud App when we’re not in the office or or, you know, we at Cloud App have, ah, Utah office but our headquarters in the Bay Area. So we connect a lot on Zoom and also use our own tool Cloud App to send videos of ourselves kind of talking through a deck or, um, a design or something where we can connect without necessarily having to meet. So eliminating those meetings, eliminating long emails where you’re trying to explain something, could be really helpful and can help kind of jump in on that visual collaboration. The next one was found that more than 60% of Gen Z and Millennials said they would collaborate. More done visually, so is one and two for the entire sampled and 60% for Gen. Z millennials so a little bit higher than the base sample. So it’s showing that this new emerging generation is two generations are looking for different ways to collaborate. They’re recognizing the ways that visual things can improve the connection and make things a little bit faster and maybe save them some time. Um, in the kind of last key insight. And then there’s 20 other stats in this report that I’m not gonna talk about. But 94% of office workers list team collaboration is top priority. So business is definitely recognize the need for, ah, focus on collaboration, enabling teams with these tools to be able to help them collaborate properly and also really get head of remote work. Um, and kind of the shift there’d the gig economy where we may not have these centralized offices. So I wrote a guest post for Qualtrics that’s going live this week, and one of the things was talking about, um, I mentioned you know, these things. Big tech tech companies. I’ve had a lot of friends at Google and Facebook, and, uh, I always went through Adobe. And so these big tech companies have these massive headquarters with all these cool amenities and a really fun, you know, culture and everything and really built to keep the people in the office. And I have to leave so you can eat there. You can get your laundry done. There’s gyms and things like that. But is that, uh is the remote future where people are more hanging out at home and companies are enabling them to be able to work from home or work remotely? If if they’re not at headquarters, is that more of the future of business in the future of work? So, uh, this report was a lot of fun to put together, Um, and kind of goes back to some things I’ve been known for in the past, and I look forward to kind of providing more of this in the future. Um, we’re looking to do kind of one on the state of productivity. Um may dive deeper into the remote work as well. And I had some good feedback on the last link in live that was kind of talking about remote work and had some good comments on how people were, uh, staying productive and connecting. Um, I think one of the things with remote work is throwing out the door any conceptions you had previously. If working in office, those things you know, may those things come naturally, like culture and connection when you have people around you. But when you’re working remotely, you really need to kind of see those things out. So finding ways to connect on slack through informal means, like I talked about in the last live and finding ways to connect as a team, definitely looking for ways to become, um, meet in person at least at least once a year, if not more if possible, and building those kind of side relationships so those things can fuel slack conversations and in connection. And then you’ll find that projects go smoother. I know when I was, I worked in the Adobe Utah office, and so that’s obviously away from headquarters in San Jose. And I always found that when I would hit a roadblock with a project if I flew out to headquarters and met with the person, if especially it was our first time meeting. Just having that little face to face interaction really provided a lot of a lot of benefit and help from both of us. Um, so take a look at the report. You can find it on get cloud app dot com slash blog. It’ll just be there on the featured post. You can also find it on my Twitter account at Joe Martin. It’ll be the pin tweet after this and apologies for the blank background on the office here. We just moved into a new space in Utah and so it’s ah kind of plane, but I’m looking forward to talking again soon. Thank you and have a good rest of the day. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast way. Hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and a fancy experience for your customer, join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App; the instant business communication tool used to create videos, screenshots and Gifs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

The ultimate remote work guidebook to improve your employees experience

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning, everyone. I am excited today to talk about remote work. It’s something that I’ve been writing about quite a bit recently and thought it would be kind of fun to share in a different medium through Linkedin live and through podcast form. Um so hopefully some tips today that will share from either research that I’ve done for articles I put up for an NCO and next week for Qualtrics and Dribble and some other places, um, will provide some value, um, through things that I’ve learned along the way. So remote work is growing. We actually have a report coming out next week from Cloud App called the State of Collaboration. Um, I’m not gonna tell you some of the stats from there, but the majority of up and coming generations are working remotely at least once a week. Um so it’s growing. People find some value in staying home, having little more flexibility not having sitting traffic, Um, maybe living further outside the city if you’re in San Francisco or New York or somewhere where it’s just crazy, expensive to live, um, so remote work is growing, especially with the younger demographics. And so it’s something that needs to be kind of recognized and, um balanced in a way to find success with it. So today I want to talk about, you know, remote work, how it can relate to again, creating a good customer experience for your employees who are kind of your internal customers, Um, and making sure that you’re being able to get the right talent that confined success with rope remote work. So a couple of things I’ve kind of learned along the way is, um, really establishing how you’re going to communicate with each other. Um, so you wanna have kind of a nice balance of, ah, zoom interactions, um, interactions over slack and also making sure you’re finding ways to match up on time zone. Ah, when I was with Adobe, I managed some resource is in Ah, India and also in eight other a pack regions in Europe, and sometimes it was challenging, you know, to find it a time that we could all meet up. Ah, India, especially, was really hard. Um, is like, 12 hours ahead of Utah. And so someone was sacrificing being either up early or out late, um, on a call. So what we found is is we could use tools like Cloud App to record videos of ourselves kind of talking through projects or Dex or documents and sending those along. Um, And then when our work days were kind of opposite, we could look at those videos and then respond, um, and connect that way, so that was that was really helpful to use tools like like Cloud App and slack and and kind of communicating that way. Um, also making sure you find the correct collaborative app stack. So there’s tons of great collaborative tools out there. Ah, that are really evolving and focused around connecting remote workers. Um, there’s like, ah, some that are kind of in my stack that I talked about last week were Asana, slack, cloud app, um, calendar. Uh, there’s definitely, like tools like trail Oh that people use. You can use, um, other other tools to kind of connect visually. Uh, those are really gonna be helpful in in connecting you and your remote workforce. Um, the other thing with communication and collaboration is is really kind of establishing what you hope to find success with. Um, so I found it was good to establish kind of rules for engagement. So, um, you know, something wasn’t super important. You could send over an email. Ah, and those would, you know, get engaged with, ah, once a day or or every other day. Um, if it was little more informal or kind of just like, Hey, I just need your quick opinion on this slack can be a great tool for that to be able to connect. And then, um if it’s like, hey, I need your help, like, immediately. You know, text message. To get a straight channel to someone can be really helpful. So establishing those rules of engagement, you know, everyone could be different and establish how you want to communicate with each other. But I found that that is helpful, um, to find ways to communicate back and forth. Um, and you each kind of know what to expect from, an email or text message or slack message. Um, when you’re in that kind of frame set. So , the other thing is, in person visits, I think is really crucial. Um, Imagine, uh, you know, Rocky four when Adrian goes and visits Rocky when he’s training in Russia and how, right before that training, seen it gets kind of amped up. Um, that he, you know, has we can call Adrian his boss. Ah, there with him. So there’s really energy that comes when you’re connecting in real life with each other. And I think in person meetings, even in the world of zoom and cloud app and slack, um could be really valuable to connect people. So I think team off sites once a year or, you know, if you’re a little closer, like, uh, I manage some people that were in the Bay Area and so I was able to just jump on a plane, um, every 6 to 8 weeks or so and kind of just hang out together. Ah, here a cloud app we have two major offices, one in the Bay Area and one here in Utah. And so, um, Scott Smith, our CEO and and Jason Toy our COO Based in the Bay Area come out here to Utah. Uh, once a month or every other month, can I can connect with here people here in the Utah office, and I’ll go out there occasionally as well to connect in real life. So building those relationships is helpful, Um, and finding that mix of in person email, text and communications that really fit in with how your, um, time zone commitments are can be helpful and really create a good personal experience and customer experience for your internal employees who are also, you know, big customers and the lifeblood of the company. Um, the next thing that I was kind of thinking about is, um, creating informal relationships. So I think it’s good to not always be talking about work. Slack definitely provides a great opportunity to, um, you know, the modern workplace office cooler, the water cooler where you can kind of just connect with people. Um, if you find someone that you like you both like sports or civic team, you can talk about that informally or, you know, TV series or whatever you’ve connected with your team members on. Ah, that could be a great way to connect um, informally. And also, you know, find things to bring people together across the company. So we have a lot of, uh, most of our work force here. Cloud App is remote, and so we’ve done a few things like, um, we have done some in person meetings last year. There was, ah, big offsite. Um, that we all kind of met up this. That was before I came to the company, but brought everybody together, which was great. And then we also try and just do random, you know, contests that could bring us together as a team, like March madness or, ah, fantasy football or, you know, sports related things. Or you can kind of connect on a TV series or things like that. But those little, ah connection points that are informal can be kind of fun. Banter for slack can be a great way to really connect with one another. Um, and especially bring in those people that are remote that may feel a little desk disconnected from headquarters to be able to find that that success Um, one thing that I, uh, appreciated at Adobe was, um, was the support of remote work. Ah, and kind of, you know, lots of tools and trainings on how to manage those things. So the next thing is is really did this research tips and tricks. There’s lots of great articles and content out there. Um, that can really that can really help you to learn how to manage that remote team and create the best experience possible. Um, I think the true success is when if you’re managing a remote employee that you recognize that it’s completely different than managing someone next to you. So you have to put in a little extra effort to connect with them, to make sure that they’re they’re feeling appreciated and feeling like a part of the team. Um one other thing I’d like to do at Adobe when I had some remote people, it and or if I had, like, a mixture of remote and in person people that were kind of next to me is I would, um, separate out the medium so or put everybody on the same plane. So if you’ve ever been remote working from home and you dial in the like a conference room call and everyone’s kind of chatting and brainstorming something And then you try and, like, chime in from the phone, it always feels a little awkward, a little disconnected. Um, it’s hard to like, you know, force your opinion in there when other people are talking about our next to each other. So I like to put everyone on the same medium with a zoom call. Um, even if we had, you know, three or four people in the same office, um, and one person remote, I’d have us all kind of dialling from a zoom call, and that would make us all kind of on the same plane. And we saved those, you know, in person team meetings to being in person so that that worked out really well and was kind of, ah, fun thing to test out so remote work tips of the day. Um, establish your communication goals and how you’re gonna how you’re gonna talk to each other. Rules of engagement for that fine collaboration tools that can help you find success. Um, collaborate visually when possible with zoom, cloud app other tools that can help you connect visually and, um, connect informally as much as possible and also scheduled those in person meetings to have the Adrian-Rocky effect. So I hope those are helpful in creating that experience for your employees and for yourself. If you’re working remote and look for the State of Collaboration report next week that I’ll be chatting about, um, some of the stats on remote work and how people are preferring to communicate. Hope you have a good weekend, and we will talk soon. Thanks. Thanks for joining the DNA andExperienced podcast. Hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly share a videos, screenshots and Gifs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud up dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

Creating experiences with sales and customer success with Cody Gilland VP of Sales @CloudApp

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Excited to have Cody Dillon with us today. Cody is the former director of sales at Lucid Software and currently the head of sales at Cloud App, I thought it would be great to get Cody’s perspective from a sales and customer perspective on building an experience and how that looks within the modern workplace. So Cody tell us a little bit about yourself.

Cody:

00:48

Awesome. Thanks, Joe. Just happy to be here. And thanks for inviting me on this. Pretty cool. Yeah. Um, so, yeah, it’s just Joe mentioned I’m the current head of sales, VP of sales and customer success at Cloud App. I joined just actually, few months ago. Um, yeah. So quickly. Background, I guess. Born in Hawaii raised, uh, yeah, partly there and then also in Atlanta Georgia area and had a great childhood. Started a bunch of my own little businesses and okay, you know, scaled it up a little bit as much as a 14 year old can with a little lawnmower and pressure washer. So, uh, kinda had an affinity for the starting businesses and for, um, doing a good job as well. You know, one of things I always appreciate looking back on my old landscaping days was you could start with a terribly ugly yard and ah, get paid fairly to actually turn it into something beautiful. Yeah. You can see the excitement in the owner’s eyes of, like, over kind of delivering on. And they’re like, I just didn’t want a bunch of I don’t want my grass to be four feet tall and you came in and made it look nice and their stripes. And, you know, there’s everything’s edged up and just exceeding expectations. So little I’m getting money. It was always satisfying doing a good job and seeing the results. Kind of Ah, turnaround from nothing to something.

Joe:

02:27

Yeah, I kind of wish we were recording with video right now, so you could see the light in Cody’s eyes talking about landscaping.

Joe:

02:35

He puts all of our lawns to shame. But it’s cool when you can find some passionate something passionate you’re about. And I think Cody’s definitely displayed that in the business side, was well and really tries to provide a 1 to 1 customer experience for everyone he works with here, at Cloud App and also people he worked with at Lucid and before. Uh, what are some things you kind of learned along the way? To really know, Set a company apart in the experience sector where you know, big enterprise or small business feels a little bit of loyalty to your product to your company based on, you know, that 1 to 1 interaction.

Cody:

03:22

Yeah, it’s a big question. There’s there’s just a lot to be said. I think anyone can connect with a great experience or someone taking them by the hand and ensuring that they’re having a good experience of that. They’re satisfied with, you know, the results that were given to them, whether it’s service or a product, you know that there’s a lot of great companies out there doing it now, and there’s been varying amounts of that over time with other companies. It’s really cool to see some of the resurrect and whether it’s a leadership or it’s, uh just meant a mentality change in their customer base, whether for their products dynamically changed. But seeing companies turn around and go from not carrying it all about the customer to then doubling down and focusing on that, I think I think one thing that’s interesting about that, like the SAS Tech world isn’t so easy to become like a licensed user and or a free user or something like that. If you wanna freemium model, uh, and then not to get anybody noticing you right and you could be it doesn’t matter who you are. But if you don’t come through the right funnels and metrics than you know, you could end up paying for products that you’ve never actually spoken anybody or given any feedback to or, uh, you know, I really felt like nobody cares. But the companies that do it really well and I had a great experience with this at Lucid as well as, um, you know, here Cloud App so far, too, Um is the customer that the emphasis on customer focus it’s It’s so huge. I mean, here one of the first things that Scott Smith, our CEO here, at Cloud App wanted to have when we first sat down, you know, several months before even came on here to Cloud App is he said he wanted to help starting a sales team in a sales organ and a sales motion like we like. I had experience doing over a Cloud App at Lucid being the first sales rep there and helping them scale up to 100 whatever 400- 500 sales people have now, we went from four or five million to about 100 million over the course of a little over five years, Um, and to kind of take some of the learnings there and applying to Cloud App one of the things that he said when we sat down was I want to start out with building the sales team. But I also want emphasis on customer success. And, um, we actually hired our first customer success manager before. It’s gonna work out this way before we actually hired our first sales like e So, um, you know, he really he really means it. Not just not just Scott, but the rest of the team. But the focus on that has really paid dividends, even here so far, Um, your customer success has been, you know, a pivotal, uh, Well, it’s been an enormous asset to cloud app so far because of digging into the customer experiences to where we’re at, you know, being Ah, you, uh, start up. And with cloud app, we do have three and 1/2 1,000,000 users Were you have tens of thousands of new registered users coming in the door every day and new customers every day and understanding their pains and their needs and being able to build software and solutions that address those needs. But you’re not always going to get that from some sort of metric, right? Um, the feedback that we’ve been able to get from our customers success team has been so important as that, how we’re driving our road map and you getting other people involved around the organization and helping to solve problems or or, um, just even just thinking customers for their feedback and because been super helpful for us, right? Just interacting there. It’s you. Not only do you make customers for life, but you also start making some friends, you know, which is great.

Joe:

07:15

Yeah, It’s really interesting that you kind of went hard on customer success. I think to your point the self serve model that we kind of live in with a lot of products and no cloud apps in the freemium kind of model, like slack or Graham early or Dropbox or like any number of businesses nowadays where, you know, I could just sign up for a count. And the automation on the back end is pretty good to the point that, um I can kind of, you know, choose to engage with someone or not, um, that privet providing those reps for people that need a little bit more help or need some on boarding. Maybe, maybe in the case where they’re only using one of your features. That isn’t probably one that could help them the most. You know, someone like customer success manager can really jump in and make sure they’re using it properly, and that ultimately leads to you no more revenue for the company and obviously higher satisfaction of loyalty.

Cody:

08:18

Oh, absolutely, . We’re definitely letting her foot off off the pedal there. When it comes to customer experience and customer overall customer voice customer voices very important to T. Howard. We’re kind of building out the program here at cloud app. So yeah, it’s like you always hear the old adage like customers always first, um or, you know, Burger King said. I have it your way or whatever, but it feels like it’s definitely even more important now to really be customer feedback loop focused with businesses.

Joe:

08:36

So if you’re you know, having one of these 3 to 6 month business cycles where you’re kind of you know, I came from Adobe, your let’s say you’re grinding it out with Adobe and kind of having to keep in touch with them. How can really visuals and videos enhance that experience both for yourself, for your customer, Um, along the way?

Cody:

09:19

That’s a good question. Like I guess where my mind goes first is there is, like from a customer perspective like and just like a human perspective, I guess, is the more sense is that, like that could be triggered from a new experience with the product or service, the more I’m probably gonna be interested in if I hear something and see something, you know, I love to eat. So if you taste something right, like someone buys me food, that’s one thing you like that, uh, you’re sent you a gift basket or whatever it is like just the more like of ours. You know, of a human’s senses that are involved. I think it’s just going to naturally create ah, greater affinity towards, you know, whatever product. Oh, our solution in our company that you’re kind of working with right visuals in particular, like with that being said visuals in particular like, yeah, same old, you know, it might be tried kind of thing, but a picture is worth 1000 words, you know? And yeah, you know, if if that’s what a picture is worth like, what’s a video or a Gif or an it like or like a, um, like infographic, right. You can get so much more across so much more quickly to so much larger of an audience with a quick image, then you can with you know, two paragraphs are a really long email or, uh, something like that. So I think it only all I can do is help, right? And to get your point across, it’s I don’t think it’s gonna hurt, you know?

Joe:

10:59

Yeah. Yeah, like, uh, you know, enhancing the senses. Um, for me, kind of first exposure with, like, video and visuals was actually, um, I put out this daily kind of, uh, metrics update for one of one of my V. P’s at Adobe. And I knew that she was kind of getting crushed with email every morning. But this this report was important to her. She wanted, you know, to be able to see what happened that night in the day before and things. And so I started kind of recording the top bullet points in like, audio format and then later on, turned it into, like, a quick video. And that way she could kind of, um, turn it on in her car or listen to it on the way into the office. And it was one less kind of email she had to read. And I feel like that’s kind of where a lot of people might be where, you know, if I come into, like, a two hour meeting, I come back to my desk and I’m just crushed by email and slack and text messages and everything. Uh, so anyway, that I can kind of consume that differently. You know, at lunch we’re talking about ah, you know, crushing through email and how hard that can be sometimes. So be nice to just build a, um, listen to something or watch something while you’re maybe doing something else or whatever finding different ways to consume things. Um, kind of on the lines of how other brands or cos they’re doing things well, to really learn from a Zen experience business. Uh, what’s what’s the recent experience you’ve had that’s really made you, um I kind of have an ah ha moment. Or like, Hey, that’s that’s really cool how they responded to me. I’d love to incorporate that type of experience in my own business.

Cody:

13:03

Yeah, So I think, uh, one of the initial mistakes I made here was letting letting our CEO know that I enjoy, like, woodworking because the next thing I know is we’re moving it, as were preparing to move to expand into a larger office as well as we’ve been kind of rapidly scaling here. Um hey, he said it would be really cool, like some kind of custom piece. Uh, you know, whether it was, like a nice phone booth or some piece of furniture or whatever. Um, you know, he started going over some of some designs he was looking, and I said, I could probably do that, you know? And so then we we found. So then I got tasked with it, so it was good, but But then But then we start reaching out to different people, especially the designs in which he kind of really liked. And so I reached out to a couple different companies. I didn’t really hear anything back. You know, the only way I could get, like, pricing or quote on, like maybe there’s a design or blueprint or even their entire product get to fill out a form and then, you know, some of them I still haven’t heard back from what it’s been like over a month, So it just gets lost in the sauce somewhere. And, um but I have to get credit there’s this company called. Um um, it’s called the fellow. I think I think there are in Manhattan. They, uh, did a great job. Like they sent an email back immediately. Although I did have to fill out a form and e mail back immediately and asking what I wanted and how I wanted it, which had basically alive e mail conversation over, like, two minutes. And then, um, we asked for a product or design that it’s major tweaks and they said, Oh, yeah, we don’t have that right now, but we do have an awesome design staff on hand. You know, let me get you a couple sketches, basically that you could kind of go off of, and we could see if we could custom design something. And so I was like, Okay, no going back from this guy for, like, two weeks. Well, it was like two hours later. They had custom designs, kind of sketched up, and, uh, wanted some feedback on it. It was just great, like so basically, they ended up turning, you know, one of a piece of customer feedback that we had, and then they said, Hey, because we didn’t have this already, and we think this is gonna be a great product as well. These great ideas, right? You’re gonna make this one of our other products. We’re going to provide the other customers. So not only are we gonna do this, like, for you, but, uh, we’re basically give you hooking up like the friends and family discount, and basically charge just a fraction of the cost for what we initially ordered And then another kind of custom, Uh, instead of design designs and plants. And so it’s just awesome. And it all took place and literally, like, not even half a day. And I still like I said, haven’t heard back from a lot of these guys. So undefined that’s really funny, that contrast there because we definitely live in a world where, like, you feel out of form.

Joe:

15:52

I know that I have this other day like Cameron what it was. But there was a form there, and I was like, Oh, man, I’m gonna fill this out. I was like the furniture company, and I was like, I’m not gonna hear from these guys for ever. Right, right. I mean, I need to find, like, a phone number or I need to find, like, a Twitter account or something that just blow up. And, yeah, well, we live where customers want the experience, but also it’s really glaring if you don’t provide it. Which is kind of the example you brought up.

Cody:

16:28

Yeah, I think, I think kind of all in all. Like what makes it great customer experiences is really there has been a like, a recognizable Well, it’s a feeling or whatever, but you have to be able to recognize Is the customer some level of concern from the company or from the representative or whatever? Whoever you’re talking to are there to be some sort of recognizable form of concern. Whether it’s like just a concerned or like interest in me is the consumer or as the customer right and me, my problems and the solutions I’m looking to find way all have bad experiences. We’ll have bad customer experiences like I think we all kind of boils down to like they just don’t care, and it’s very evident right that I get tons of calls a day or I get, you know, tons of people I talked to turn into people or you know, whether I got the car lot and like, Hey, if you’re not gonna buy right now, I got more people. I gotta go talk to him. Right? Right. Um, rather than being more concerned with helping me find the right vehicle, Right. Um and, uh and, uh, you know, the people who care the mostly coming from the sales perspective, the best sales reps I’ve ever seen along with the best sales leaders, too. Uh, the best ones I’ve ever seen or worked with. It worked around, Um, they they have the ability to really care about not just the customer or the phone call or the deal or themselves or their commission, but whatever it is, but they have the ability to care for, you know, the individual, you know, whoever they’re over there talking to talk about, whatever problem, it’s still their problem. And if you have the ability to to put yourself aside for a minute and and, uh, even if it’s just for while you’re on the phone call, put yourself aside and be able to show that you care. And, um, the way you do that is by active listening, asking questions, try and understand how you can solve solve their problem. What would their perfect world look like? But really digging into it And then, like these fellows guys that gave you an example of they immediately kind of turned around. They hustled and they said, Hey, what about this? Hey, what about this? They’re trying to solve my problem. And whereas I couldn’t even get anybody else to answer me so to me that there was just such a stark contrast that just like you said that still haven’t had people answer me, Um, and these guys immediately turning something around they won the sale, right? Like anyone and I went with them within a matter of, like, a couple of hours, and it would have been sooner than that if I didn’t ask him to draw up, like, you know, custom plans with the different changes on it. So, um, I just can’t stress that enough, like having having, like, the intensity in, like the emotional care come across the line or through video or in person or whatever. They gotta be able to see it in your eyes and you can’t see your eyes that they have to be able to like hearing your voice, you know, And, um and you also show that you care with your time. So, yeah, there were some other things that you like later in there that at least that I’ve seen. So I think I think what we take away from this from as we close up is one show up to begin with, right? Yeah. Don’t blow people off because you’re tired or you got other meetings.

Joe:

19:47

Exactly. And it’s, I think SAS or B to B companies. Maze Think. Well, we have an automated email replies to people, right. It’s like, No, you need to have a sales rep like within 24 hours for the further right, you know, contact us type of deal. So one show up to bring that personalization that tone, that connection on that really comes through through training and through hiring the right people on. And I think those are kind of really short term keys, toe leading an experience business. Any parting words, Cody?

Cody:

20:23

Absolutely, Like, people are still people, right? And, uh, in the world of automation, you can automate just about anything when it comes to especially sales or customer experience, you know, communication lines. But nothing’s gonna nothing’s gonna trump. Um, you know, hiring the right people and training the right people the right way so that they said they they can’t identify with the customer they can care and that they’re, you know, correctly incentivized to solve problems for the customer and, uh, to ensure a great customer experience and have that be your focus. If that’s your focus and that comes across really clearly to the rest of your team, then Ah, and that’s related to the customer than I think. Only good things can happen.

Joe:

21:08

Awesome. Great stuff today, Cody. Thanks for coming. And those of you listening. Definitely check out last episode with Nir Eyal. And we’re looking forward to having you on for the next episode. Have a good day. Thank you. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for customers. Join the collaboration 2.0, movement today by getting CloudApp the instant business communication tool used to create instantly share videos, screenshots, and Gifs. Perfect for both internal and external communication get started for free at www dot get cloud at dot com. Thank you we look forward to seeing next time.

All content © 2019 The DNA of An Experience.

Productivity apps – how they can improve your PERSONAL experience at work

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Joe

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud Ap, where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Today I want to talk about meetings. Who loves meetings out there? I’m sure that there are so many people that are raising their hands right now that I wouldn’t be able to count. So meetings definitely have a purpose. There’s a lot of value of getting people together, being able to talk through things, set up a plan. Ah, have some outcomes and be able to kind of progress projects coming from a huge company in Adobe. There is also a lot of opportunity to really a line on large projects, so we’d have some campaigns. You know, there were multi $1,000,000 campaigns that had four or five different teams working on different aspects of it, and you really had to kind of sync up every now and then to get value out of that, Um, and make sure that things were lined up. I also really loved one on one meetings that have skipped level meetings where I’d meet with an executive and build that kind of chat through things with them. So meetings have some value. Ah, and sometimes they can take over your day. Ah, maybe you can avoid it. Maybe you can’t. So first, I kind of wanted to talk through a couple of productivity APS Ah, that I’ve been using for the last couple of years. That really helped me when my schedule can sometimes get bogged down by meetings. Definitely has been a lot lighter with Cloud App where I don’t have as many teams or large campaigns with lots of complexity to work on like I did with Adobe. But I like to be able to have a good productivity stack to really find success. So a couple that I’ve worked with for a few years, um, first, is slack. I think we a lot of us have jumped on slack and been able to kind of find value there. Ah, there’s a lot of opportunity to really learn, um, how to communicate with people. I think it’s great for remote teams to connect . I worked in the Utah office, and a lot of my team was in at headquarters in San Jose. So slack provided. Really fun and formal way to stay connected and really learn from each other and follow up on projects. I also love since college, my undergrad and grad school. I guess grad school most was G sweet. So Google Doc school, she’d school slides. Uh, those have been super valuable to collaborate on. So if you have, you know, projects that really need a bunch of different eyes on them Google docks has been a great way to connect on those things. Uh, I usually like to end things in, uh, the Microsoft Suite s so I can do a little bit more editing and definitely using Excel for what I’m doing analysis. But G sweet provides a nice starting point for those things. One of my favorite things that I’ve done recently to G suite is ah, one on ones on Google docks. So really looking at Google docks. And I can look back at previous week to see what we talked about, kind of what people’s tasks are and helps me to align my mind to everything that’s kind of going on. And, uh, you know, if really, if you’re able to write down things like that and and be proactive. Then you’re able Thio, stay on task and get more done. So G suite has been great. Um, one that have recently been testing out is called calendar dot com, which is pretty cool. It’s ah, run by a friend of mine named John Rampton, and callen, dr dot com provides some really great data on your calendar. So it sinks with your calendar, and it will show you some really interesting people. Analytics on nohow. How ah, long are your 15 or you’re our meetings actually going Can you cut those back? Where can you kind of optimize your calendar? Lots of cool stuff going on with calendar dot com. That’s when I really enjoyed um, I’ve had this in my stack for awhile and loved it so much that I joined the company. Ah, that’s Cloud App. So I’ve been using it for probably a year and 1/2 to 2 years. Uh, Cloud App is a screenshot, screen recording, and GiF creation tool that provides, you know, instant business communication. Visually. So pretty cool that you can create these visual tools visual collateral that links to slack and other work flows. Ah, I found it. A really useful use case for marketing was connecting with design teams. So at Adobe, why do these really long demand? Jen reports Ah, for this adobe digital insights team that we called it and these demanding reports, uh, we’d have these long back and forth e mails with marked up P D EFS going back and forth to make it right. And eventually I started using Cloud App to record myself talking through the doc. Ah, and I found it was a great way too express myself. Uh, auditory and visually versus writing something down. And it was a way to skip a meeting. And I’ve been using Cloud App to skip meetings ever since, Ah, where I could just say, Hey, can I just explain this to you in a video and send it on slack versus, like, someone calling me or or setting up a 15 minute meeting? So it’s been really valuable there. Ah, to do is when I’ve loved as well. To do it is kind of like a to do list app both Web based and on your phone. Uh, and I started using that cause at the end of the night and I know a lot of other people who have this I would always come up with new thoughts right before I fell asleep. S o, I have a notebook by my bed. I’ll write those things down and and kind of process in the next day. And to do list was kind of like is my next step. So I take things from my notebook. I’ll put it in to do list and kind of make it a task list for myself. And I can refer back to those ideas and decide if I want to flush them out a little bit more or not. Uh, the other thing that I picked up here at Cloud App is Asana. Um, so on my team, Maile Waite is an Asana ninja. And so I’ve learned a lot from her. Ah, on how to one assigned tasks to my team, Um, add priority and and really crank through things that way and also tasked to myself. So it really helps me to know what I need to focus on what I need to get better on and what for a longer term in short term projects where I’m kind of at war my progresses. So Asana has been great for that. Um, there’s ah, interesting stat from a survey that Cloud App is gonna be releasing in a couple weeks that 40% of office workers spend three more three or more hours a day in meetings. So ah, you know, back to my first point for those people that are kind of crushed by meetings, these productivity app skip one kind of help you relieve some of that if you’re able to get work done quicker and to hopefully you know, tools like calendar dot com can really help you to know, um, how to optimize your calendar and another kind of thing I’ve learned on and have been practicing for a while and and got reinforced, Um, the value of it with a podcast they did with near A All a couple weeks ago. He’s the New York Times best selling author of Hooked and just came out in Distractible. Um, we did on the DNA and Experience podcast from CloudApp. We talked about time blocking and really creating moments in your calendar. Ah, you know, people say that they don’t have time for anything. But, ah, if you, you know, block out time for things, you’ll find ways to make it happen. So each day I like to have, ah, a couple of hours, ideally of productivity time. And that’s where I’m kind of secluded. I’ll go off Ah, away from kind of all the noise of the office and open my turn off all my notifications and really just kind of, um, zone into what I need to focus on for that day. And I’ve found that that’s really a great way for me to, um, one feel like I’ve fully accomplished something and been proactive and not just reactive for the day. Um and also just know that I I checked some major things off that I needed to do that day. So that kind of links back to Asana to do list and those other things. So I’m I’m loving this collaboration productivity mindset that the world is kind of moving to right now. I think remote work is a big piece of that where it requires you to need to connect on different mediums excited to kind of be a part of Cloud App. That is a piece of that and how visuals can really connect people and reduce meeting needs. Um, but I think those productivity apps really cool. And I hope that people are commenting and getting giving feedback on maps that you’re using, and I look forward to hearing about that and checking those out. Uh, and I hope that what I kind of went through today on my stack and what we’ve kind of been using here it cloud up is valuable for you. So go ahead and check out, um, Cloud App to do list Asana calendar dot com g sweet and slack if you haven’t already and comment or respond with any other APS that you’re using in your stack, and I look forward to checking those out. Thank you. Have a good day. Thanks for joining the D. N A. Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create. Fear customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud up the instant business communication tool used to create instantly share a bowl, videos, screenshots and gifts perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get Cloud App dot com. Thank you. We look forward to seeing you next time.

The psychology of experiences and creating habits with guest Nir Eyal

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Joe

00:00

Welcome to the DNA Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us.

Joe

00:16

Hey, welcome to the DNA of an experience podcast from cloud Up. We’re excited to have have all with us today. Here is a a great author of a book that I’m a big fan of called Hooked and also one coming out that I’ve been reading. And it’s been a lot of fun, and I also just love Nir’s backgrounds going to Stanford, which I did a program for Adobe through Stanford. I learned a lot about design thinking and and lots about the creation of different businesses. We’ve been able to connect on that and also just really connecting on social. That’s kind of how we how we connected, which is kind of fun. So I’d love for you to tell me about yourself and how you became an author, starting off with some of these books that you’ve done.

Nir

01:17

Sure, yeah. So I started writing back in 2012 after my previous company was acquired, I’d help start to companies, and we’re the last company that was acquired. I had some time on my hands, and I wanted to figure out what I would do next. And I had this hypothesis that habits would become increasingly important as the interface shrinks from desktop laptop to mobile devices, to wearable devices. And now to these auditory interfaces like the Amazon and Alexa, that interface kind of disappears. That if you don’t remember what to ask the technology to do, it might as well not even exist. And so that kind of convinced me that we had to figure out how to build habit forming products. And the problem was, I didn’t see a book on how to do that. So I started writing about it, and that became, ah, class that I taught at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford and later at the design school at Stanford. And then that turned into a book. My first book Hooked: How to Build Habit Forming Products, and five years later, that book is done very well. Thank goodness, it’s done better than I expected. Certainly. So, over 1/4 1,000,000 copies to date and shortly after that book is published, Um, you know, I wrote that book for a couple reasons. One is that I wanted to democratize these techniques so that people could use the same tactics with social networks and the gaming companies used to build habits. Why can’t we use that for good? My target audience was never the gaming companies and social media act like they have known these techniques for years. They didn’t need my help. My target was the rest of us. How do we know who those who are building SAS software or enterprise software, educational software or fitness software banking software? Why can’t we make those tools just as engaging in The answer is we can; we just have to use this method. That was the premise for hooked. Then five years later, fast forward and we find that I don’t have to convince anybody anymore that products use psychology to observe changes in behavior. Every knows that five years ago I had to convince people of this. Today I think everybody knows that. Now I think the problem is that people find these products to be so engaging that sometimes it’s it’s hard to not over use them. And so that was the premise for in Distractible is how do we get the best out of technology without looking to get the best of us? And I originally started writing the book thinking that the problem was technology because that’s what all the other books on this topic tell you. It turns out that’s not true, that the problem is actually much, much deeper. It’s not just the psychology, it’s not just the technology is actually the psychology of distraction, and all sorts of things could distract us. And so that’s really what I want to dive into.

Joe

03:55

Yeah, I really love how you infuse yourself into the book, gonna talking about what’s been watching that place, being having your device in your hand. And there was an interesting article. I’m sure you saw it in the Times yesterday about slack, and I kind of think about I kind of like 15 years ish my career now. I grew up without social media and other things, but certainly didn’t grow up in a time where there was no email or instant ways to get a hold of people. Yeah, So what are some tips from your book? It’s really trying disconnect from that. So when I go into, like, two hours of meetings, I’ll come out. We’ll have 20 slack messages, 10 emails, five text messages, and two missed phone calls. Yeah, it could be certainly overwhelming.

Nir

04:52

Absolutely. Yeah. So the first step is to define the problem that we’re trying to solve here. And the problem we’re trying to solve is why do we do things against our better interest? So you know you want to do X, and you do why? You know, you want to sit down at your desk and do that big project, but you procrastinate by checking email and slack channels and whatever else you’re doing. You know you wanna be fully present with your family and yet we check our phones. We know we want to work out. We know we want to eat right, but we don’t know why. It’s such a fascinating question to me, and that’s that’s really the premise, the book. And so to answer that question, we have to take a step deeper to first define what is. Well meet my distraction. So the opposite of distraction is not focus. The opposite of distraction is traction. Both words come from the same Latin root, Tahari, which means to pull, and both words end in the same five letters. Action A C T I O N. So traction and distraction both end in the same five words Action reminding us that traction is any action that pulls you towards what you want. The opposite of traction is distraction, any action that pulls you away from what you really want. So this means that we have to define what it is. We want that if you allow your schedule to be made by other people, they’ll be happy to do so right. If you don’t plan your day, somebody else will. And so that’s That’s Ah, one of four main pillars around what we can do to manage distraction. But let me start with the very first thing we have to do, which is to understand what prompts us to either attraction or distraction is only two things. It external triggers or internal triggers. External triggers are the pings, dings and rings. All of these things in our environment that prompted attraction of distraction and the internal triggers are the things that prompt us from within. And it turns out that is actually the Rio source of most of our distractions. That traction, a distraction, both actions. It’s what we do in response to an external or internal trigger. It’s not the trigger itself. So if your phone rings, it can prompt you to do something you wanted to do or something you didn’t want to do with attraction or distraction. But the most important step is this first step of mastering our internal triggers because it turns out the reason we reached for these devices is actually for one reason. That is, for psychological pacification that were like babies with our pacifiers, because we don’t like to feel something, and so that we have to realize that fact or will always get distracted from something. Distraction is not a new problem. It’s been around for a very, very long time. What’s changed is that if it’s distraction, you seek distraction. You will find it is easier than ever to allow yourself to get distracted. But that doesn’t mean that we’re powerless. And that’s a really important theme in this book is to understand, is the proximal cause is the thing we blame. Slack and Facebook and Instagram and email and meetings you have all that stuff we blame but none of that is the root cause. The root cause is bad feeling. We use these things to say the reason we do everything. All human motivation is prompted by a desire to escape discomfort, so the first step is to master the internal triggers. The second step is to make time for traction, and we do that through, you know, many, many techniques. It’s a it’s a good chunk of the book. The third step is hack back. The external triggers the pings, dings and rings not only on our devices, but also all the unnecessary interruptions throughout our day. Like you know, just working in an open floor plan office could be incredibly distracted. What do you do about that? Meetings could be horribly distracting. Email could be horribly destroyed. So there’s all these different environments where we need to figure out how we can hack back the external triggers. And finally, the fourth technique that comes after we did those other three is to prevent distraction with pacts where we can actually use various technique called pre commitments to help prevent us from getting distracted, prevent us from doing something we don’t want to

Joe

08:54

Yeah, I think that’s you nailed it, obviously. And the book definitely goes over a lot of these techniques that really help you. And you know one thing I love from Damon John said this before the conference, and he’s someone give us a shout out out when we raised our money and may he said, Don’t answer, You know, the first couple hours of the day Is that someone else’s problem? So you focus on what you need to worry about first, definitely, there’s like that. Stephen Covey techniques you know, folks, big rocks and things they need to get done. So let’s take it. Oh, the brand.

Nir

09:36

I would I would just interject real quick. I don’t care if you check email first thing in the morning. I don’t know if that kind of advice is actually helpful. What I want to be conscious of is helping people understand the strategy, not the tactics. Whether you’re checking email first thing or in the morning or not, that’s a tactic. Strategy tactics or what you do strategies why you do it. So it could be that in this individual’s case, there’s a good reason why he doesn’t want to check in on the morning. Great, he should do that. But what when people adopt somebody else’s tactic for their strategy, that could backfire. It’s more important to understand why you do this and come up with your own tactics because, you know, look, if your job is to be on call as soon as you get up, well, then I can’t tell you not to check first thing more. That’s ridiculous, right? But what you should do is you should decide how you’re going to spend that time. This drives me crazy. People say, Oh, the world is so distracting. I can’t get anything done. I got emails, I got phone calls, I got text messages, group chat and I say, Well, what did you get distracted from today? What is it you wanted to do? And they show me their calendar and it’s blank. There’s nothing on it. Their whole day is one big distraction because they didn’t decide what they got distracted from. So you cannot complain about becoming distracted unless you know what you became distracted from. And so that means you have to keep what’s called a time box calendar, where you know how you want to spend your time. I mean, uh, it seems like such a simple technique is actually one of the most studied time management techniques in productivity science. Thousands of studies have demonstrated this, but I think it’s missing. It hasn’t been practically explaining away where, where you’re not just doing this on your own, you’re actually sinking. Your skier count is what I call schedule sinking, where you’re sinking your schedule with your colleagues, not only in your work life but also in your home life. Like I want people to sit down with their significant others and say, Hey, this is my schedule and where I owe you time and where you owe me time. And this is where we’re gonna spend it together. You know that in advance. Because the fact is, this isn’t this time is gonna magically appear, right? So maybe Oh, I want to write. I want to do a side business. I want to exercise more. Well, where is that time on your calendar? It’s not gonna happen if you don’t plan

Joe

11:44

You know, several years ago, my life was being overrun by meetings, and people respect that

Nir

12:01

Totally. And you should synchronize that counter with your colleagues. Look, this is what I have on my plate this week. Is this right, boss? Like do I have time for I mean, is everything that you want me to do this week on my calendar, but that’s only step two of four. It’s a very important technique, but you have got to the other four are the other three as well.

Joe

12:23

So the last couple of minutes, kind of chatty, Let’s take it to a brand level, you know. First book was very grand. Focus. Hooked. Distractible is very personal focused if your brand and you’re trying to create an experience which is becoming kind of a new thing here. Qualtrics, they’re all about experience. Business. How are you kind of cutting through that noise? All those things bombarding people, enabling them to see your brand first of all, but also recognize that you’re kind of trying to help also.

Joe

13:01

Every successful product needs to be a gem, and this isn’t a framework I created actually came out of Reach Hoffman from Lincoln. But the idea behind the gem framework is that every successful product needs three things growth, engagement and monetization. There’s a three big things you need. So growth is how do you acquire customers? And in a way that’s sustainable engagement. How do you bring them back? And monetization is how do you keep your business alive, given that you have the other two? And so what I focus on is engagement because you can buy growth, right? You could spend a lot of money on Facebook ads or Google ads or Billboard ads, whatever. Doesn’t matter on the side of the highway to get people to try your product. But a lot of he’ll skip the step around engagement around. How do we get people to come back now? Not every business needs. We will come back in the same frequency. What we find is, however, for many companies, particularly in the SAS enterprise face. If customers don’t use your product frequently, they won’t renew. And so many products are built just with growth in mind. And they become what’s called a leaky bucket because it’s so easy to buy growth. Just run a bunch of ads, right? Get a bunch of sales people, people, you know they try, your product will sign up, but then do they leak out? Exactly. And so that’s what hooked is all about. Hooked is about how do you build a kind of product and service. Is that our habit forming that people use because they want to, not because they have to, and it turns out there’s a four step model for that as well. It’s about making sure that you have external triggers and internal triggers. It’s about creating the simplest action in anticipation of reward, making sure the reward is fulfilling. And it leaves the user wanting more and then finally getting used the user to invest in the product. So it’s those three steps out of those four steps are a trigger action. Investment is a successive cycles through these hooks. This is how customer preferences are shaped, how our tastes are formed and how these habits take hold.

Joe

14:52

One last question. What was the recent, like brand experience you had on? Let me tell you one that I had that was pretty cool. So I say the W in San Francisco and I checked into the mobile out. I had my key, and I totally skipped the front desk right, which is kind of like married now that’s there, like entry point. Like creating experience for you is having a personal. And what I thought was cool was I got there late at night and I went in the elevator and there was a map. That’s it good in that in the elevator, and I thought I was kind of a cool like, You know, it’s very physical, and it’s like creating that connection without having a person doing it, knowing that they have a big base now two and three, mobile and being digital. What’s kind of like a fun brand experience you’ve had recently? Travel? Retail?

Joe

15:48

Yeah, So I’m a big proponent of the hook model. Obviously, it was based on, based on my first book, Hooked. And so where I’ve seen it applied for good in many ways has to do with patient adherents and healthcare in personal finance. I started using an app called Fit Body, which for the first time in my life, has helped me keep up, keep up on exercise routine on. So what Fit Body does is they help people who go to the gym stick with that routine by helping them know what to do when they get there. So this isn’t for the couch potato. It’s for the person who goes to the gym is like, I have no idea what exactly I should be doing here on. So the Fit Body app uses these four steps of the hook model. And I think what’s what they do particularly well is in that fourth step of the investment phase. And a lot of companies skip this step. They think we’ll just give people what they want. That’s what they’ll keep coming back. But if you are not asking them to invest in the product, you’re missing a huge opportunity. So what Fit Body does is every time you open the app and you exercise with it and you enter in the data of your last work out there, using that information to load the next trigger and customize the experience based on your last experience with the actor. So, based on how many reps you did, how many sets what you know what muscle you worked out. They will give you a custom tailored workout based on how fatigued some muscles are versus others to make sure you get a great workout. That’s a perfect example of the investment face using customer data to improve the product with use.

Joe

17:17

Okay, very cool. Well, thanks for your time today. Nir

Nir

17:19

My pleasure. Joe, thank you. If you and everyone could go ahead and check out Distractible and Hooked; that’d be great.

Joe

17:31

Thank you. Thanks for joining the DNA of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App, the instant business communication tool used to instantly share videos, screenshots and Gifs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud at dot com. Thank you. We look forward to seeing you next time.

Talking with Sarah Dudley marketer for IBM on how the IoT can improve customer experience

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe

00:00

Good morning, everyone. I am so excited to have a long time Twitter friend Sarah Dudley with me today. Um, first time we’ve been able to chat together, Um, and this, you know, being a live broadcast mixed kind of fun. So Sarah has a great background of marketing and is currently working for IBM. And I thought she could give some really fun insights into customer experience and the Internet things And how, uh, kind of marketing modern day marketing. So how? Ah, a big enterprise respected enterprise like IBM is really trying to look at, um, connecting with its customers on a personal on enterprise level. So, Sarah would you mind giving us a background of kind of what got you to where you are now and what you’re doing currently. And then we’ll get into kind of some questions.

Sarah

00:55

Sure. Thanks, Joe. And, yes, I make lots of great friends on Twitter. I don’t know. It has a bad rep sometimes, but I love it. Um, so thanks for that introduction. Like you said, I’m currently working in the on the product marketing side in IBM Watson IoT. And so I’ve been with IBM about six years now and spend a lot of time on the content marketing side and so that, you know, from an experience standpoint, definitely plays into an interesting angle on. And then also, you know, more recently moved down to product marketing side. So much more involved on the events and kind of crafting customer experiences through that lens and then also spent time and calms and on more of the strategic side as well. And and also recently I took over a call it extra curricular activities as, ah, the executive director of Boston Content. So kind of leading a community of over 2000 that marketers in Boston and kind of growing that content marketing community.

Joe

01:57

That’s really cool. Um, it kind of brings up, you know, a new wave of content that we’re kind of all of part of in that there’s so much value in trying to get people to your site and showing kind of different different angles on different things. You know, we live in like a world full of distraction and other things. Um, how how you guys tried to, you know, stand out from that.

Sarah

02:23

Yeah. So I think when it comes to experiences you. You kind of returned back to things because of how they make you feel in a lot of ways. I think, you know, experiences, content, how we do marketing these days. It’s very oriented around people, right? It’s very human focused. And so it’s no longer about, you know, what is your product do or what are the the key features? At least not right away? You know, you probably heard this before, but it’s like if you’re going on a first date with someone you’re not hitting them with, like, Will you marry me? Or maybe weirder things have been seen, But, um, it’s really about focusing in on how can we any touch point, whether it is a tweet on Twitter or whether you know some form of a social post, whether it’s a blogger, whether it’s a white paper or an asset on the Web or whether it’s an actual event, I think we’re really focused on how can we create an experience that that people can relate? You know, if it’s certain pain points when when I think about what I work on, every day it’s around, you know, facilities, management, infusing IoT into those spaces and and one, they focus areas around improving the workplace experience, right? And so for millennials and the next generation’s coming up really focused on How do you improve experience? It is for your workforce, and so it’s every touch point. How do you as your as your marketing solutions? How do you consider what do they care about most at that point, not know what did not What do we care about most? E tend to want to lead with that a lot of times, right? But it’s what What do they care about most? And how do we bring that forward in a way that we know they want to consume? And so it’s really interesting, even when it comes to creating a Web site. And a lot of people don’t think of inexperience is being necessarily digital, like a website or a blogger post or something like that. But every every touch one you have is an experience for that potential customer or for that client that you want to attain. And so it’s How do you you know, if if a certain color catches their eye more than another ones that one more if it’s certain terminology that’s resonating more than other use that more you test your messaging, you make sure that everything is aligning to what those with those prospects are most engaging with because that’s the type of stuff that that keeps pulling them forward and keeps them interested in learning more from you. And you become a trusted partner, as opposed to just somebody trying to sell them something, right, because we’ve all we’ve all been there, where somebody just starts pushing something on you the second you meet them and it’s a huge turn off, especially for buyers in generations coming forward. And so being able to build that connection before you start throwing stuff at people I think is huge. Whether what I said is a piece of content on the Web or whether it is an actual event experience. You don’t go just to hear about product. You go for community, you go for networking, you go for entertainment. You know you can you go for so many more things than just information.

Joe

05:39

Yeah, I think that’s a really good point. You know, you made a ton of good point. So what? I wanna latch on to a little bit is the You know, ever since I added kind of like head of marketing to my title, moving over to cloud out from Adobe, uh, my linked in inbox is just insane. Uh, you know, with people’s trying to sell me things and also just, you know, somehow they get my my corporate email. Um, and that’s also messy family. Right? And what I appreciate, though, is, um, I’m kind of with ones that seem like they could be interesting because I still do Look, which, you know, there’s value there for salespeople. Um, but all the ones that are interesting, I’ll reply back and say, Hey, you know, take a cloud app. Use cloudapp screen recorder to take a screen recorded, like how to tutorial of your product and send that over to me. Um, so there’s kind of like this. There’s been a few that have actually done it. There’s been a probably the majority you haven’t, um, but the ones who have won it like I kind of sold them a little bit, but they kind of, you know, went the extra mile and did kind of that Experiential sales, you know, motion that you kind of need to do to break through the noise like you mentioned to really try and connect 1 to 1 versus like. Okay, this is just an outreach sequence and you’re just blasting a 1,000,000 people. And you’re hoping, you know, 500 respond.

Sarah

07:18

Yeah, it’s almost It’s It’s like, you know, they’re playing a numbers game, right? And it’s like, Oh, well, to send the same You know, when you’re getting a personalized message from someone who genuinely wants to connect with you and maybe has done a little bit of work to see, you know, what are your interests, or not even maybe not even at that level. We joke sometimes about, you know, someone’s gonna reach out because they know, like my my sibling’s names and, like, how’s your brother, Michael? So there’s a year behind right between personalization and customization and just creepiness. And in this day and age, especially where privacy is important and is not crossing that line for people because that’s the quickest, you know, there’s some key ways to break that trust really quickly. One is not being personal enough, and you just feel like you’re one of the masses, and the other is being so personal that it crosses the lines, right? And so it’s like, What do you How do you find that happy medium for people that they feel like you want to capture their attention because you care about addressing their challenges and not not in, like, an overly aggressive or lower on caring way?

Joe

08:31

Yeah, it’s kind of like that could be like the evolution of, you know, the customer or the chief experience officer is kind of like one of the hot new, you know, sea level titles, um, and that, you know, overseas a lot of that, like personalization and testing and customer experience and how you’re connecting with enterprise customers and hopefully preventing those, like target experiences where they send people know personalized, like congratulations on getting pregnant.

Sarah

09:07

or not pregnant. That was target that did that right there. I hope your parents found out their child was pregnant or something. Aren’t

Joe

09:20

you? Yeah. Uh, um, which is, you know, super creepy. Probably based on, like, buying behavior and other things, but, um, yeah, so there’s there’s really fine line there. What do you think is kind of the DNA of a good customer experience.

Sarah

09:36

Yeah, I mean, I would say it’s probably a couple of things. It’s definitely a connection. You know, it’s customization to to a degree, like, I feel like when I’m getting something from you in my inbox or getting an invitation to something, um, or getting targeted by something on law. And it’s because I fall into your target market very specifically, and not in, like, a very broad way, but like okay, based on your buying patterns, we we know that you like this type of old ing or something like that, like customize enough where I’m not getting ads or or e mails or stuff about things that I’m not even remotely involved in. But just because I have a certain title or I work for a certain company or involved in some way, then it’s just kind of sent out, you know, to the masses, Um, so there’s a customization angle there, and and the more that people can address critical pain points, um, you know, for somebody who works in content more, getting just the ability to improve work flows or something, you know something that’s very specific to a pain point that I have every day, Um, and then and also the connection point. I think for an experience to be memorable for to be something that I want to share. And I think that’s probably the last point. Is is share ability and the desire to want to share. But that connection point where I really, really relate to what you’re sharing with me, Um, whether it’s at an event. And I was at an event in the full and there was this one aspect of it that it was tied to a keynote that said somebody gave and then after the keynote, you know, go right on the wall, This huge wall that covered their the portion of the outside area, you know, what do you want to achieve before you got on? And so it fell. It was it tied and really well with the messaging. But it was like, you know, a facilities management conference. It wasn’t a real estate conference. It was kind of interesting angle to play for people didn’t directly tied to your job or that conference, but it was a connection point, a an opportunity to bring together the community of people that you’re surrounded with, and either you hadn’t engaged whether interacted with and you could just really like the biggest fears. Envision people that were surrounding you that you don’t know. And I just remember spending like 15 minutes just looking at it and like nodding my head to certain things and it leaves you inspired. And then I immediately wanted to share that. And not only did I want to share it on social media, but then I wanted to go back to my team and be like, Hey, it was a really interesting thing that I saw happen. You know, maybe it’s something we could think about as, ah, interaction or a connection point for events, you know, bigger, small. Just taking that concept. While the concept itself was maybe a little dark for all events, just the idea of that sharing opportunity to build the connection with the people that you’re trying to bring together because no matter who you’re talking to you, there’s going to be more than one of those types of people, right? So what’s that common link with something that brings people together? It could be, you know, being a human and what’s that human centered link? But it could also be very specific to the people that you are targeting. Like I think recently our worst united airplane. There’s been a lot of stuff, just pours lately with the movie out and so just paying attention to, I just I find some of the stuff that some of these experiences like, but they come out with really interesting to me. The, uh, the pop up experiences that have been happening a lot like there was a happy place in Boston for a while. Um, there’s the friends pop up. Now there’s a Britney Spears one going into L A. Soon that caught my eye

Joe

13:37

like Instagram museum style. Things like that.

Sarah

13:41

happen area forever trying to think what it’s called. But I saw Yeah, like my Instagram feed of like Adobe employees was just basically everybody going there saying, Yeah, replaces. You can take basically built for social. Um, yeah, that’s that’s really interesting. Like I think, you know, you have a unique perspective, kind of being involved in Internet of things and like very digital, faint digital and like the future of work. Um, and there’s still, like very really like human element things like we all are very similar, even though we have different backgrounds, like, we all have the same, you know, fears and struggles and other things longer lives. Um, in a world where we have so much going on with digital and Internet of things and other stuff, how can those behaviors with those devices, um, helped to kind of create an experience? How can those fit into that?

Sarah

14:48

Yeah. So it’s actually funny, you ask. And this is, ah, metaphorical example. We actually recently put out um, like a blonde poster story about how the North Pole uses the IoT too. Ensure that, you know, Christmas never. You know that Christmas never fails that every child gets a toy for the holidays. Um, and and obviously, the experiences those Children getting a toy on Christmas morning, but you don’t see is the massive operations that go on behind the scenes to make that all happen. So everything from you know, putting sensors on toys so you can see how Children play and engage with them. And of course, these are riel. Yeah, but you get what a thing. And then, um, you know, in the workshop that the elves work in, how do we make sure that those bases are best utilized and optimized for collaborations that they have? You know, those faces they need to create and filled the toys all year, and then on the operation side, how do we use IoT to ensure that equipment is running as it shows that maintenance is done when it needs to be done? Um, and so that everything is up and running so that you don’t get a situation where the whole shop is down, and then Oh, my gosh, you can’t create millions of toys for boys and girls and so that the ultimate experience is that child on Christmas morning, right? But but I o. T. And you think that apply that to really life, and it’s like the water that you drink in the morning is your receiving that because of the infrastructure that has been built, that you can get water in your home and sent the IoT sensors are employed to ensure that that infrastructure stamps and that maintenance is done when it needs to be done. The same with bridges the same with, you know, getting electricity and the same in your workplace is in your buildings. You know Howard Howe. Are you ensuring that maintenance is done when it needs to be that facilities air optimized all of these pieces people like, he said, We don’t necessarily think about a lot of the stuff that we interact with on a day to day basis, but that’s where a lot of IoT can come in to help keep those things running that you may not even think about on a day to day basis. So Chris Smith’s and You Know the North Pole is like a cheeky example of that. But it’s a way that people can visualize. You know what makes those experiences really profound happened and all the things that need to happen behind this means that we kind of take for granted. And that’s really where the power of IoT can come into play. And then, of course, you know there’s there’s the personal side I like. I’m sitting here wearing a Fitbit, and it was telling me I need to get up and move more throughout the day or you know how much water. Have I drank today? That type of stuff. And so in a sense, more simplistic sense. It’s how how come in his eye to really improve our lives from our daily lives, based on the data we’re already getting from a variety of different sources about our behaviors and our activities. And it’s putting that data to work so that we can better understand what people are doing, how they’re behaving. Um, and not just people, but assets, buildings, all of that type of stuff so that we can make more efficient processes and hopefully cut costs for businesses. And that’s always a good thing, right? Saving?

Joe

18:19

Yeah, definitely. That North Pole campaign sounds really cool enough to look that up and show it to my show to my kids.

Sarah

18:27

We call them the Millennia. L’s Yes, it was. It was. We do one in each year as a fun holiday campaign.

Joe

18:39

Um, so it’s been great chatting with you. I kind of just want to close with with one question. You know, I I’ve kind of admired IBM and Watson from afar for a very long time. Um, I think it was maybe like fiveish years ago that you guys kind of rebranded most of your marketing to Watson, Um, what is what is kind of ah, what’s on the table right now with Watson and IoT from IBM side that you’re kind of excited about and kind of tie that into what you see, the future of experience business being

Sarah

19:18

Yeah, I know. I think that in a lot of ways, we’re going to continue to infuse IoT and now artificial intelligence right into a lot of what we do. And so, uh, you know, one fun thing that we’ve had some of our our latest events is she’s actually called Sarah. She’s a strange resemblance to me that I was not involved in making of Sarah. Um, and she’s our virtual assistant for buildings, actually. And so using her, you could earn it was fun. You could take a picture with Sarah even though she’s virtual and your real. But this idea of having a I kind of infused into buildings into your operations and being able to, you know, take the data you have in those insights IoT is generating, and then really use that to kind of generate that intelligence, I think into what you’re trying to create in your processes and then your operations or beyond. And so for us, it’s, you know, taking something like Sarah. And how do you create a virtual assistant for your office? For your operations? Going back to that would place experience, you know? Can I book a room faster? Can I find things faster? Can I get someone who can answer my questions? Usually that type of thing. So those are some of the kind of the fun things that are that are coming from experience standpoint.

Joe

20:36

Awesome. Well, I’m looking forward to kind of seeing what creativity comes out of your department and and IBM as well. Um, and thanks again for joining me today And hope to do this again next year.

Sarah

20:51

Yeah, Sounds good. Thanks, Joe. Great show.