Talking the modern workplace and customer experience with John Knightly CMO at BlueJeans

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning and Happy New Year to everyone. I am so excited today to have the CMO of Blue Jeans network John Knightley with me. John was at adobe just like myself. We had a little bit of overlap there and have been chatting for a few months about getting together on a linked in live podcasts opportunity and so excited to host him today because Blue Jeans has really been an innovator in kind of connecting remote work and the modern workplace adobe We use blue jeans, and it was a great way to connect visually with people. Um, video conference being became the standard when I was kind of leaving Adobe. Uh, and it was always nice to be able to, uh, being in Utah office versus being at headquarters, be able, connect visually with people so excited have John and I’ll let give him a chance to give a little bit of his background and things. He is excited about blue jeans for 2020 and then we’ll go into kind of some questions about customer experience.

John:

01:32

Awesome. Thank you, Joe. It’s really great to be on your show here. Um and, uh, for those of you guys who aren’t familiar with blue jeans, Joe kind of gave you the high level. We’re about $100 million. SAS company focused on helping teams be more productive meeting over video, You know, around the world, whether it’s on mobile, whether it’s on desk top in the browser, on conference rooms, Tums. And so, um, I’ve been, you know, personally intact most of my career from very early stage startups to yo midsize companies all the way up to, like, Fortune 100 type of tech companies. But in loving the right here, blue jeans, it’s great, too. Not only help people be more productive, and it worked, but also, you know, we just did our 2019 round up, and you have saved, uh, something like 24 million tons of of carbon, right? Just people not having to get on their planes being able to get their work done that way. So Ah, a lot of fun.

Joe:

02:36

Cool Yeah, And it it brings up, you know, kind of the modern workplace is is something we talked about a lot. Here at cloud app and how Ah, a lot of people are working more remotely. We have some data that we released a couple of months ago about how 57% of Gen. Z is working the majority of the week remotely. And so it kind of brings up a couple of questions. One is kind of How does, uh, how do you kind of see the modern workplace evolving and are those How do you kind of create an experience for your employees first, uh, with them not necessarily coming to those really cool headquarters all the time that it used to be. And then secondarily, how do you How are you creating any experience for four customers in kind of the modern business world?

John:

03:33

Yeah, well, you know, you mentioned Gen Z. So if you think about over 50% of the workforce now is Gen. Z Millennials and folks who basically grew up with mobile phones in her hands, you know, thinking about video chat, emojis, texting, snap chatting all those things and email with something their parents did. Right? So, you know, how do we kind of shift from this more paper driven, sequential sort of process too? Uh, you know, just letting workflow it different moments, depending on where you are and nuts or being fettered by more this notion of a structured meeting or structure document and things like that. So, you know, we also did some surveys and saw that you not only are our people in a lot of meetings, but there’s a lot more of the sort of five minutes of stand up quick meeting to come out of a slack or, ah, teams chat or whatever, where your hate can we just connect for a few minutes, get something done? And then the other thing we’re seeing with meetings is how do we actually turn them into, you know, to take them from, you know, ah, scenario where it’s very formal and you’re coming in and reporting out on things to actually just like, let’s just get work done. Let’s just pull up a document and let’s just start getting work done, not just talking about getting work done. And so you know, we did a survey as well earlier this year and, you know, basically found it. About 31% of meetings in a work week were rated by team members and managers is either not very useful or completely worthless. Ah, and if you sort of add that up, it adds up just in the U. S. Private sector, 11 to, over $400 billion of waste every year. And so part of this is like, can we just kind of let people reclaim their calendars, figure out how to be kind of more productive, be able to get their own work done so they can go home to their families and friends or their gym or whatever they like to do in their private time and not have to be shifting all of their own sort of core work deep work whatever to the evenings and weekends, but have time in their calendars to get that stuff done during the day? And then, as you mentioned their whole remote work thing, I’ve worked at places where you know, there was the be in the office kind of scenario, and I would go to commute in for an hour and 1/2 to the office and all my team members were not in yet, but they were dispersed over multiple locations around the world. And I’m like, Why am I driving to the office? To then hop on a call with everybody like, let’s just get rid of that stuff. And instead of shipping the talent to the work that ship the work to the talent in that way we can hire the best people no matter where they are. If they want to go skiing in Utah, we’re gonna hire you in Utah and off to the races, right? Or we’re gonna hire someone in wherever else, Right? Um so I think the whole workplaces shifting. I think it’s a good thing, cause they’re finally waking up to it. There’s a war for talent. You want to get the best people don’t feder them with all these, you know, crazy rules and responsibilities like let’s get higher, great talent unleashed them, let them get to be creative and get their work done and then have a great sort of set of cloud tools, uh, whether it’s blue jeans or whether, like you’re in marketing and you wanna capture great content, we love cloud app. We use you guys here for our marketing. Let’s just make it easy for people to get done. What they need to get done.

Joe:

07:18

Yeah, I think that’s a really interesting point. There’s, ah, there’s a nice blend of like on site connection. And then once you’ve had kind of that meet up, you know, quarterly or twice a year, whatever it might be is a team. Then you can have your blue jeans videoconferencing that connects you that way. And then, uh, yeah, when I was when I was at Adobe, you know, I managed a lot of people in a pack, and it was kind of nobody was really happy to do a call early in the morning or late at night. We used cloud app for that like a synchronous communication and kind of, you know, pairing all those three things together really forms kind of the modern workplace, right? As far as, you know, he brought up a lot of good pain points and reasons why someone would kind of seek out like a blue jeans to kind of solve some of those those pain points. What is kind of Ah, what is the DNA of an experience look like from provided from blue jeans. Uh, what do you guys try? And, you know, set yourself apart along the process to really creating experience from acquisition to that No long point, long term loyal customer.

John:

08:36

Yeah. So, you know, uh, great brands, um, following by relentlessly delivering on their brand promise. And in our case, if our brand promises, you know, making teams more productive by connecting them over high quality video audio through the cloud. Our opportunity, then, is to do this extremely well and over every meeting scenarios and not just when you’re in a, um you know, the corporate office. But when you’re at home when you’re in an airport, when you’re on your commute, like if we can really get it so that it works wherever you are, that’s really critical. And then, you know, part of the marketing then becomes when our customers were using blue jeans and bite their customers or their vendors to a meeting using our platform. If we’re performing well in all those scenarios that the network effect right that those other people get exposed to blue jeans And so I think part of delivering a great customer experience for our customers. Then it becomes our marketing right through a network effect of Hey there, vendors. Their customers are are exposed to our platform. And if we’re doing well in those scenarios, it’s a great opportunity for us. You know, on the marketing side, you kind of mentioned that part of the customer experience starts was when someone’s researching a product and kind of does this fit my needs or not that my needs and one of the areas where we’re trying to differentiate is by, you know, once once people sort of solved the video works, the audio works. The screen share works kind of what’s next with meetings, some of the people in our space air going into things like telephony or chat, we sort of feel like those are areas that are solved well by other products. And so we’re really focusing on the meeting itself in making that meeting more productive. And so, you know, we talked about the 30% wasted meetings. How do we unable you too confidently skip a meeting if you’re not really essential? Like 48% of the people who surveyed attending meetings for fear of missing out, right? And how do we get rid of media faux mo If you will help him and just say, Hey, we’re gonna give you a highlight reel, whether it’s the action items, the key decisions, those kind of things. So you don’t have to If you miss a 90 minute being, you don’t have to sit through a 90 minute, um, video recording or, you know, a 12 page transcript. You could just get a 12 highlight reel like an ESPN SportsCenter reel of the meeting. We’ll have those highlights, and we call that Blue Jean smart meetings. And so part of kind of that that’s a new concept for people. It’s not something that well understood and to make that sort of easy for people that digested, understand? That’s actually where we use cloud app, right? We said, you know, we can put a lot of we’ve been trying to texture describe this and everything is gonna be People will be scratching their heads. What is this? Actually, let’s just actually video the product, be used well, spice in some, you know, video recordings of a team having a meeting, and that’s what we ended up using for smart being function October. We had video up on the main the home page for a month. It’s now in our smart being stage. You can check it out, but we used Cloud have to do that because you know, no one has. The patient’s, frankly, to sift through a long document, trying to describe something. If you can show him in video, it’s a lot better. And so part of that customer acquisition is Hey, let’s make it dirt simple to understand what it is we’re talking about. Then you condone. Let’s try to make it as simple as possible to try a lit right. Try it out, see if it works for you and then, you know, obviously, hopefully, once you decide to become a customer, we make it easy with tips and wizards and chats and things like that to help you continue to get more knowledge about it. And then we also for larger enterprise, have great customer care people that you help you through adoption and and, you know, continue tune your usage across the multinational type of scenario, where you have a lot of different people using it in lots of countries and offices and things like that.

Joe:

12:41

Yeah, I love that. I love that smart meetings launch because you make a really good point, especially in those, like enterprise companies, like an adobe, if I feel like, especially at the more junior levels. Um, there was almost like people felt some prestige going to meetings for summer. Um, obviously, after being there while you that wears off and you’re kind of like I’m over this, you know, meetings all day and then I do actual work at home. All right, so it’s Yeah, nice toe. Nice to have some options to speed that up. And when I was leaving there, one of the things hacky things I did without necessarily a product was I just started scheduling those, like 5-15 minute meetings. Like you said, it’s like I know you. We talked casually all the time. We don’t need to, like, have this fluff conversation like, let’s just cut to the meat. Let’s do dinner any minute, call and then we’ll be done will go back to the like, normal, normal life. Yeah, And then I cut all of my our meetings in tow like 45 minute ones, and started adding more of an agenda and, like we all work with each other enough that we don’t need to, like, talk about the NFL playoffs or whatever for 10 minutes, the meeting like, let’s just cut that out. And we can save that for another time. I wonder. Whatever. And let’s just be really proactive in the meeting. So, you know, Blue Jeans really helped enable that. And I think the smart meetings. This is really interesting addition to that. Um, as far as you know, I think you answered a couple of things about what you guys are doing is a company water. Well, there’s there’s, like, 10 companies, especially that are kind of, like cloud app size and then obviously much larger ones that I would love to look like. But I’m not quite there yet. Resource is wise, um, that I really pull from and emulate things and really admire, uh, water. What’s that kind of a company you’ve had a recent good experience with, um and what did they kind of do to set themselves apart?

John:

14:59

Yeah. So I thought of you sent me that question. I’m thinking about it. And I mean, obviously we we work in Tech, and there’s a lot of tech companies and cloud companies that are doing some great stuff. But I was also thinking about some more traditional kind of recent experiences. I had, um, and it get cuts to the heart. I think of customer experience that it’s about thinking about. Are you are the things that you’re doing? Are they in service of what the customer wants to achieve? Are they in service of what you one of achieve? And you need to really make sure you’re thinking about what the customer wants achieve and so simple example? I was traveling over the holidays and ah, yo, I have well, actually have both Hertz and Avis kind of, um, premier status or whatever. But just that notion of walking in and having my name and knowing that the car’s ready, uh, makes me more loyal. Because if I go to a another company, if I’m I know that, then I’m gonna have to get off the airplane. I’ve got in my family about all the bags and everything. We’re going to stand in line and wait to get the car right, so that would be one example of customer experience. Another one was recently, uh, banking experience and I don’t know. Yeah, I believe it. And I still have some CDs. I don’t People are even doing it these days.

Joe:

Yeah, but the interest rates are so crappy on savings accounts,like, can I get a little bit more somewhere? So the thing that always hated about CDs is they again seems stacked up in the bank’s favor in the sense that when a CD comes to maturity, you have, like, a six day window to quickly decide. Are you gonna flip this thing to the next another whatever time period? Or do you need this to go into a savings account or whatever and you’d have typically call And, you know, I would sometimes miss those windows, and then it’s like, Well, it’s too late. It’s looking over now. So I hope you have enough cash, you know, for that clock, right. So, uh, this time I Marcus, they’re actually owned by Goldman Sachs, but it’s just in online banking thing. I went in because at a seedy maturing, and they made it so simple. They’re like, you want it to flip over. You wanted to go into your savings account. You want whatever. And you could just do it online. And you’re not calling 800 numbers and waiting on hold and all that kind of thing, I think. Okay, that’s that’s the model where yeah, maybe they would want it to flip over, But they’re really putting the customer first saying, How do we make it convenient for you? Not What do we want you to do and got to be earned? My loyalty? L I’d rather stay with them, even if it’s a slightly lower interest rate. Just because I know I’ve got more control, right?

John:

17:44

Yes. You know, same And software, right? How do we How do we think through the custom, what the customer trying to do like And we’re having this own internal discussion around, like, web website forms like you want to get data on customers. But you’re basically doing that for you, Not for them. And so how do you kind of get the right balance for you? Don’t make it friction free for the customer prospect or whatever. And yet you’ll get enough data that you can appropriately serve them, right?

Joe:

18:17

Yeah. Yeah, there’s that you brought up a good point of balance. I think, you know, there, taking that banking example, the SAS. It’s like, yeah, you want it to be hard for a customer to cancel. Um, but is that best for the customer? You know, you had a kind of, like, find that that place of, like, creating enough friction that they maybe think about if they really want to cancel but not making it. So they have to, like, call that 800 number and, you know, wait online, wait on hold or whatever. And I have a bad experience on. Better yet, no great customer.

John:

18:59

Yeah, And better yet, like, what do we need to do relentlessly to continue to earn your business? So if you know, we you know, the whole something. We didn’t really get into that much. But the whole, uh, keep peace about customer experiences is really listening and continuing to involve customers in your design and your UX i kind of thought processes. Um, you know, we see experiences is really everything in a way, and I say experience with a biggie because part of it’s about yo usability and convenience and things like that, but part of the biggie and experience is also thinking through things like security, privacy, um, accessibility, for example. So you can have a great, um, kind of front end experience. And then you exposed customers to a vulnerability or, ah, fraud or something like that. And you have a pretty big fail in your brand, right? Um, and with accessibility, for example, that’s another one where it’s like, How do you design within everyone, being able to use your tool in an open and accessible way and make that not a checkbox item but actual core principles for the way you deliver your experiences? We’ve got some really forward thinking customers who have been really great in helping us think through those things and start to say, You know, this could be a really advantage if we can really design with all users all audiences in mind and have that have that great experience. And so ultimately, at the end of the day, the reason someone decides not to turn is because they feel like you’re really delivering on your brand promise. The reason they brought you in the first place and hopefully we hopefully we keep those folks is loyal customers, right?

Joe:

20:54

Yes. It’s something I have learned a lot. Coming into this role is how crucial feet the feedback loop is. Mmm. No, Like our CEO is like personally reaching out to, like, a couple of people that were frustrated on Twitter or something. You know, a couple of months ago when we switched over to a new system and he’s, you know, doing ah, personal quick call with them to really listen to them here their frustrations asked them how they think it could be done. Better consider putting that in the road map. And I think you nailed that right on the head is like finding ways to get that feedback. Not taking anything personally, really kind of understanding what can make it better. And, uh, really enabling those customers.

John:

21:49

Yeah, customers I know in our space and sounds like in your space to customers are pretty pre prompt to let you know something isn’t working right. So social media is an easy way now for people’s event. Something not great. Um, way do customer advisory boards as well. And we do a lot of sessions we like to go, you know, while our pride in our case. A lot of times, a primary buyer might be the I T or the user, uh, the unified communications specialist and company. The reality is our suffers used by a lot of non I t people, right? And so part of our mission is to make sure we’re getting in front of end users. Just see how they using it, where things not obvious. How can we continue to improve and make their lives easier? Uh, because at the end of the day, they kind of want to be able to get their job done. Um, whether it’s a marketing person using your software or, you know, an executive who wants to communicate through video or, in our case, people who wanna meet or have Ah, great video event. Uh, so how do you make that super easy? And so I think the this whole experience economy is I mean, we know and we live and breathe it in the fast world. But, you know, car companies were trying to be, you know, like transportation experience cos air conditioning companies were trying to be like building experience cos right, and they’re taking these physical products and trying to wrap them with digital and with data and with insight, and then be able to actually, you’ll continue to improve and adjust to consumer realities and things like that. So I think it’s exciting. I mean, and being sufferers, you have that instant feedback around what’s going on with your products and how do you take that? I mean, one of our sort of really important journeys around customer experience was, how did we get our mobile experience off the turn? Awesome. Right? So we were three point something in the APP store. Ah, and we’re now at 4.7 on Absolute and Google play. And that’s been a process of just yes, some of it’s going out in testing your stuff in the wild, right? Is it working at Starbucks is working in the airport. Is it working in the car? Um, yeah, you’re in our case. We’re limited a little bit by band with, like, you. You could only get so great bandwidth when you’re out there. But in those scenarios And that’s what led us to deliver in our new mobile app, we have a standard mode low data mode and then commute mode No, really trying to make it easy for those users who Fat finger when you’re in the car, whatever is so works. And then, you know, Hey, we’re gonna tone down the video to keep them up band with for the audio to work in a little low data kind of scenario. So, huh, just relentlessly focusing on the user’s. I like Jeff basis, I think, was one of people who always talked about errors, right? If you don’t have to call, it’s because we have an heir her someplace in our process, right? It wasn’t their simple for someone to get something done online. And I’m a believer in that.

Joe:

25:03

Yeah, it’s It’s a blessing and a curse, like you said, with how quickly people respond to something broken because, you know, obviously that’s hard to deal with. But it also means that your integral part of their day right now and so it’s, you know, finding finding the ways to hopefully prevent the mistakes as much as possible or the bugs. Yeah, really improved that. So we’re kind of in nearing the end here. Let’s do now. We’ve got done a lot of this along the whole conversation but what’s kind of your 92nd? Ah, modern workplace crystal ball. What? What do you see happening? Um, what are you guys focused on? What do you think? It’s kind of the next the next part of what we evolve into.

Joe:

25:54

Yeah, So, I mean, I think a big one you you basically opened with this is gonna be letting people work how and where they want and providing great tools to do that. Part of what? We’re excited about our new technologies coming online, like, 5G. We just had an announcement with Verizon and Samsung around how we’re gonna be, you know, enabling the five g enabled workplace that’s gonna free up the workplace to be everywhere, not just in an office. Um, and you’re gonna get high quality bandwidth and little agency band with the ability to have a HD video conference. It’s gonna not just be great for traditional workers, but also, you know, things like remote repair technicians out on, you know, on the tarmac, it in an airport and things like that where they need that high fidelity video. So we see this sort of work anywhere, Uh, any time kind of scenario, And then we also have this huge passion for how do we help people reclaim their calendars and just have the meetings that they really need to be in and get the highlights for the others and that allow people to get their deep work done and, uh, have more time for their physical or mental health and families and friends and skiing and all those good things? Yeah, that’s I think that’s the the opening goal. Right? Is I mean, we’re evolving into this. Uh, it’s not there was that whole Twitter blow up a couple weeks ago. You know, people talking about how much they worked, I I think that sure that we’re going for with with tools like blue jeans eyes really trying t oh, yeah, like you said, enable people to work, get their work done and be productive, but still be able to have that time outside. That was John. It was super nice having you today. I’m glad we’re making able to make it happen. Ah, great way to start the year and look forward to talking again soon.

John:

27:53

Thank you. Really appreciate the opportunity to be with you here.

Joe:

27:58

Thanks for joining the DNA Of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your Customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Reviewing the State of Productivity Infographic from CloudApp

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. This is Joe over here at Cloud App and excited to chat with everyone today about the state of productivity infographic that we put out here it is right here. You can find it on our website. Get cloud app dot com. We did some unique research surveyed about 1000 people to really find out what people were spending their time on at the office Really focused on kind of the time wasters. And we found kind of some interesting things about what people thought was kind of being a waste of their time and thought that would be fun. Talk about here on a Friday, um, one into off office workers age 18 to 60 listed social media as their biggest time waster. Um, a little ironic, obviously, because I’m, you know, broadcasting this, um, through podcasts and linked in and other social channels. Um, but, you know, that can be something that quickly derails any productivity you have with project. You’re working on. We gotta live in in a very distracted world where way have lots of notifications, unlimited content to consume social media channels that we can, you know, peruse and kind of shut off your brain for a little bit and that, you know, takes a while to kind of get back in the pace of things can take good, like 30 to 60 minutes sometimes if you get distracted and kind of move off of a project to get back going so kind of knowing what these people are saying they’re spending their time on can help you to know how to improve on that. Um, one thing I thought was interesting that if you look it kind of up and coming generations of Gen Z, which is anywhere from 18 to 25 so kind of just entering the workforce if they’re just graduating college or, you know, have have kind of got went straight from high school for the workforce, Um, one in five of them are spending 10 plus hours of their work week watching YouTube, Tik Tok and other social related video. So that kind of shows what growth is happening within social within Gen Z and also could be related a little bit, too wanting to have a little bit more of that flexibility. We send a trend with remote work in the growth there and how things have kind, kind of moved towards people having more intellectual, flexible days, flexible time at the office and less of, ah, like 9 to 5 more of, ah, get my work done and account balance in my life. Um, the other thing is, and I kind of felt this Maura a big company. But, um, 40% of all office workers listed that they were in two plus hours of meetings a day. So obviously meetings can definitely be productive, but sometimes they can take away from that actual work that kind of drives the business. There are a lot of times when I was at a much larger company that go to meetings and, um, and I’d end up having to do know my day to day work at home and or I’d get behind and put a little bit lot more stress on kind of working and having that flexibility of work. Um, so definitely mindful of meetings and how many you’re scheduling, Um, kind of near my time. At Adobe, I really loved doing like, 15 minutes stand up meetings with my teams and, uh, cutting down like, 60 minute meetings into 45. It’s amazing how you know, if you come in with clear agenda, you established kind of rules of engagement for meetings and kind of everyone knows what to expect. And then you kind of roll through the meeting. You keep people on task, and then you have kind of clear take ways, how much more they could be effective and how much less time you’re spending your time in meetings. The other one that I wanted to talk about was, um, from the State of Collaboration report that we released in October, and it’s kind of tied in with this in that 60% of office workers. I prefer to collaborate visually. So finding way spring visuals in, um Weatherby through Power Point or sending screenshots gifts or videos you produce with cloud app or just kind of connecting Maura. That remote workforce and adding collaboration and reducing the amount of time you have to spend on writing out long e mails was can be really effective to saving time. Um, as we move towards kind of 2020 it’s interesting to kind of evaluate where you’re spending your own time. Um, in kind of episode one of this podcast DNA and experience that we run here, cloud app. I interviewed a Nir a all who wrote a book called In Distractible, and there was really cool technique that he kind of brought up, and it was about time blocking. So it’s about kind of really owning your calendar and blocking out times when you were working on certain projects. You can have, you know, your your longer term projects that you spent time on your shorter sermons. You can block out time for your one on ones with your team. Andi actually even went as far as blocking out time with his family. So, like he would have blocked out time for one on ones with his Children and date night with his wife, and how that really helped him gain control and said his phone aside and and really have that balance that he’s looking for in his life. So the biggest kind of time wasters from the simple graph that you can find on get cloud app dot com were social chatty co workers. Which kind of be maybe a a piece of like these open offices that the everyone’s moved to, um, social video for Gen. Z specifically. And meetings also found something interesting about baby boomers. They’re two times more likely to say social media or the Internet is their biggest time. Oyster, um, so interesting that it kind of spans all generations and then one other. That was kind of interesting. There’s a bunch of stats in here, but 40% of Gen Z list slow WiFi or computers or technology as they’re kind of an inhibitor. So we rely on a lot of different productivity and collaboration. APS, um, sales force and Google, Andi analytics and lots of other things. And so what? Those tools go down, you know, like slack goes down, and it really puts an inhibitor on your ability to get work done. So finding ways that you can kind of really remove those distractions create opportunities to be really productive when you are kind of working and finding the tool set that really fits your needs, so that when you are, you know, being productive work which no one could be 100% productive all the time that you’re really maximizing that time. So hopefully this infographic is helpful and it kind of shows you what trends air happening generationally and currently in the office. Definitely. Take a look. Um, and visit. You know, the infographic get cloud app dot com on our block and you will be able to kind of Seymour unique research that we’re putting out in the near future. Hope everyone has a good Friday and I will talk to you again soon. Thank you. Thanks for joining the DNA Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

CEO of Fellow App Aydin Mirzaee talking the modern workplace

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning, everyone. I’m excited to have with me today, Aiden from Fellow App. Aiden was gracious enough to join us this morning to chat a little bit about customer retention, enabling the remote, a modern workplace with fellow up and kind of get some insight into some of the experiences he’s had running a B to B sas business multiple times. So Aidan has some great experience. I’m excited to chat with him today and talk a little bit more about those things. And Aidan why don’t you give us a little bit of background on you and Fellow App

Aiden:

01:01

Yeah. So, uh, so glad to be able to do this. Uh, I think that should be lots of fun. My So it’s my quick background is I’ve just been entrepreneur my whole life. Uh, been starting businesses since Probably as far back as I was maybe 13 years old. Uh, but but really, you know, before this, I had another company that was in the online service space. It was called fluid wear and it was a company that we grew to just about 100 people and then sold it to surveymonkey. Um, so went through that process of, you know, boot shopping, getting a company to a point where, you know, it was, you know, revenue positive. We had over 10 million in annual sales and profitable and then going through that acquisition process. And so, um, the reason that that’s relevant is because when going through that process, that’s that’s originally when we came up with the idea for our current company, uh, which is fellow and, you know, as we were growing that company, one of the things that we realized was that their software for every walk of life, um, and the one thing that still didn’t exist before we start a fellow was software just for managers of teams and so, you know, didn’t exist. We decided, created. And so that’s kind of the origins of fellow today, obviously at fellow having a lot of fun, we just recently launched and, uh, starting to basically ramp up growth and users.

Joe:

02:29

Yeah, that’s really cool. I think it makes a lot of sense. You know, we put out some data a couple weeks ago in this state of collaboration report and talked about how 57% of Gen. Z and around 50% of millennial generation’s are working from home or remotely the majority of the time. Um, and obviously like startups, a lot of them build remotely big companies that are based in the Bay Area. You know, people don’t want to fight traffic and things, and so you have to create tools like fellow and the cloudapp screen recorder, screenshot tool, and GIFmaker and others. It’s really trying connect visually and collaboratively digitally and makes a lot of sense.

Aiden:

03:11

Yeah, Yeah. I mean, it’s such an important thing. I feel like, you know, the more and more technology there is, um you know, to support the model, the more and more it starts to happen, like all those friction points, Like the little things that prevent you from being able to run distributed teams, all those all that friction starts to disappear. And, you know, I think you know, I can relate to this in a bunch of different ways. Even in the non remote standpoint. You know, one of the interesting things for us was, um you know, as you’re growing the company on your first starting out like, everybody is in the same room, you can kind of, like, you know, turn your head and speak to the next person, you know, and, uh, that kind of works for a while. But then, you know, the team start to grow, and then all of a sudden maybe your two rows of seats and then three rows and four rows, And before you know it, you have a whole floor. Now there’s some people who are on one side, and then there’s people on the other side of the floor. Um, and before you know it, now you’re on two floors and then three floors, and then you’ll notice that the people are on the first floor. Don’t talk to the people on the third floor, and then you get the second location, or like and then like us, you get acquired. And so now you have. You’re part of this company that has offices in, like, seven or eight different locations and like a lot of people work from home and a lot of people in different offices. So, yes, there’s this kind of work from homes, you know, concept. Yes, there’s this kind of remote concept. But I just want to emphasize this. This the fact that companies now our understanding that they can have multiple locations, ends faster, like it’s it’s totally okay for you to be three people in one city and 10 people in another city, because technology actually allows for those sorts of things to happen. So this concept of remote applies to so much more than that. Maybe just the narrow framing of the word remote may seem to some people.

Joe:

05:02

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Um, you know, we’re kind of in that framework here. At Cloud App we have HQ in the Bay Area. But our largest offices here in Utah, where I am and so and then we have, you know, people remote all over the world. And so, yeah, we kind of live in living the same type of world. It’s, uh, creates that opportunity to connect still digitally over video conference and other things, Um, with kind of like this growth and, you know, like collaborative product productivity, APS, other things. How you kind of gone about, um, cutting through that noise and distraction with providing, like, a good experience or just a really clean on boarding path with fellow. I know you guys just recently launched, so it’s kind of obviously still ongoing, But what is going your thought process in the beginning,

Aiden:

05:57

Um, I mean, a couple of things. So, yeah, we’ve just launched, but we’ve been in beta for a long time, and so we were one of those products that kind of existed, had a bunch of customers, had a bunch of revenue even during the beta face. We’ve been just doing for this for for quite a while, but I think you know there’s a couple of things have become necessary, right? So the second that you have a distributed workforce, that means that obviously, people are working on different time frames. Some people like to come in at certain times, you like to stop working, and then maybe you start working again later at night. Sometimes you’re at different time zones. It’s in One of the things that is that you concepts like it’s a messaging or just like phoning people stops to work as well. So the next time that you’re trying to send a message and it might be, you know, 9 a.m. your time. If you’re on the East Coast and you’re thinking, Oh, that’s like 6 a.m. on the West Coast like maybe I should hold off on this message. So I think fellow capitalizes on that and all of the kind of collaborative, um, software products that allow for a synchronous communication cloud app included, you know, kind of allow for that use case to be more prevalent. So our view with fellow is, And because we’re so focused on helping people have better attractions through meetings, one of the things for us is like, Yeah, I could message Joe right now, but we’re meeting tomorrow at 3 p.m. So I’m just gonna put this in my agenda for tomorrow. And when I go to my agenda for tomorrow, I see that Joe also put in a bunch of things that he wants to talk about. Is there with fellow. Everybody’s creating these collaborative agendas all the time, and so it’s not just about like the second that you think about something. Let me message that person right away. It’s Hey, let’s actually very good about this and create these collaborative agendas with people that I meet with teams that I meet with and so that when we do actually meet, we can then talk about all these things in a superficial manner. Our meetings become more effective. And just like the way that an organization communicates become better becomes better

Joe:

08:10

Yeah, really great. Brings up a really unique, um, like mindfulness opportunity exercise that I think we’re all trying to fit into with, uh, no slack and text and email and social and so many notifications kind of bombarding us something is really unique. Way to kind of. I know that you’ve got something and, you know, you can use fellow to kind of table that idea get it out of your mind, but not necessarily have to send an email or whatever just set up for the next meeting.

Aiden:

08:42

Yeah, and by the way, like this stuff, you know, it’s really interesting. I think you know, if you go back really far back and you know you read books like the effective executive right classic book and management drunker and even in that book. And like in that time frame, like people have been recommending for the longest periods that you should really have a notebook set aside. And in that notebook you maybe have multiple pages. You have one page say for each direct report, and then you have a page for your sales meeting and then another one for your marketing meeting. And so the idea is like every time you think of something that you need to follow up with someone about or talk to someone about, like, write it in the appropriate section in that note notebook and table it away. And so, like this common workflow and we think the people who are the most efficient communication, like use that work on one of the things fella, does it just make stuff like that easier. But what necessary makes these things necessary, Obviously, like in the kind of remote and distributed use case is that at. For those users who work in those environments, the complexity that they have to operate on from a communication level is so much higher. So one of the rules of thumb around this is that if you are a promoter distributed team, you have to operate at roughly five times a complexity of, you know, your equivalent counterpart. That’s all in the same office. So what that means is like if you’re a team of 20 people and you’re all distributed, you have to develop the communication, um, basically processes and procedures of 100% companies. So if you were 100 people and on the same location, you would eventually have to get better, communicate, communicate in and build more processes around that. But because your remote team, you just have to develop that stuff a lot earlier. Now it turns out there’s a lot of benefits to having that that rigor around communicating and working better together on DSO remote teams are by necessity and needing to develop those things earlier. But it’s also a really good thing because they would have had to get there as a skilled anyway. So there’s a positive angle. You have to be more proactive, but you would have to do that anyway as you scale. So might as well get that done right away.

Joe:

11:00

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I thought you could provide kind of a unique insight. You know, we talk a lot about customer experience on these live broadcasts and on this podcast, um, and I think you could provide a unique angle on employees experience. Um, how do you How do you think? Or how you guys kind of vision fellow, And you know, APS that it kind of improve this collaboration really improving that employees experience and helping no sass companies or small start ups to all the way up to know the enterprise companies retain those, uh, their employees a little better.

Aiden:

11:42

Yeah. Yeah. I mean, it’s a great question. It’s all about the people. Every company’s always about all the people. But the second that you’re more distributed or the you’re more remote things just you have to do more things. So if you and I were sitting next to each other in the same office all the time, you could argue, and it’s still, you know, basic things. Like, say, a one on one meeting. You know, something that managers and their employees should you all the time. Um, you know, a lot of people in smaller companies you know that we talked to sometimes say it. Yeah, you know, like we can see the importance of it, But we kind of sit next to each other and, you know, it’s kind of weird to then go into a room and and and, you know, just basically have this one on one meeting, like we sit next to the whole day. So at fellow we have part of our job is to convince those people that no one, no one is completely different. And you should absolutely still have them. Even if you’re sitting next to each other. Because, um, when you’re in a room, you can ask all sorts of different questions, like, how do you feel about, like, your career growth? Are you gonna go out in the open when the person sitting right next to you, right? And And if you did, the person would probably respond. Ah, good. I didn’t you know. So, uh, so it’s still necessary. So we have a fellow. One of our jobs is to make sure that everybody understands this concept of one or months example. But in the remote use case, I mean, there’s no excuse like I sure hope that all of the remote and distributed managers in the world out there our meeting with their direct reports on a weekly or biweekly basis on, and they’re doing that very consistently, and hopefully they’re using something like fellow, um to basically track those things. But at the very minimum, this should be happening. And it’s especially important for things like that to happen, because you start to lose connection to what the organization is, what’s going on the information and just like having that repertoire and like that, basically, um, the report between, like the working relationship that you have with your teams. But on top of that, there’s other things that you need to do. So, for example, it makes sense that say that the marketing team and the sales team should communicate like that’s probably a good idea that they should not be silent. So once you start to be a remote team and maybe these teams are in different locations like that, Connect needs to be something that you need to go out of your way to actually establish things like all hands, meetings become even more important because this is an opportunity for people from all the different offices actually participate in and ask the questions and learn what’s going on in the company. So all these, like special types of meetings that are just good for company culture and communication anyway, just become so much more important the second that you have team members that are not on the same room. So basic things like, say, hallway conversations that just happen. And people kind of build report that way, like even those sorts of things now won’t happen. So you have to do more things, and you have to put more processes in place to make up for the lock of those things that might have happened naturally if people were around the office. Ultimately, like the stronger the bonds between not just managers and their teams, but piers with each other. You know, the better those teams start to work together. So ultimately, like if you want your teams gel well together and to to be able to really build on each other’s strengths and get the most out of like what that team can accomplish together, you have to put in these processes to make sure that this communication and those meetings actually do happen.

Joe:

15:22

Yeah, I think it makes a lot of sense. You’ve got to really focus on that that culture and really make it a part of of who your company is. And people can kind of buy into that one thing I love that adobe did when I was there was something called a check in. Um, it was kind of like removing performance reviews on doing it on a quarterly basis. And so, like, man it when I was managing people, I kind of knew what to expect from those meetings. They were gonna be talking about salary and crew development and new challenges and other things really focused on the on the employees and then for me, the same toe like my you know who I reported to. They knew that I was gonna kind of come in with feedback on management or, you know, it was really, like a safe place to talk about things that were not tactical and day today. Um and I think, yeah, like what you said fellow and really kind of fits into that connecting and putting that hopefully making that effort from a manager and an executive perspective a little easier to connect those dots?

Aiden:

16:31

Yeah, 100% You know you start to realize that, as you start to build larger and larger companies, is that it’s all about the people. It’s all about their relationships. It’s all about understanding how each person works. What are their strengths, their weaknesses, what they like, what they dislike, how they’re at their best when they’re at their best, what you need to do to unblock them in different scenarios. It’s just all those things, and those things aren’t. You know something that you can just figure out by looking at someone? Um, it’s a water work you have to put in the effort you have to pay put in. The time you have to put in the process is to make sure that those things happened on ongoing basis, and then the other thing is like if you’re a CEO or you’re an executive at those years of cos it’s not just enough for you to make sure that you do that with your team. Now you have this added responsibility of like how do I make sure that this is actually happening in my organization and is happening all the time. It’s not something that we pay lip service to. This is how basically teams operate in, like your company. And so, um, again, like, I think this is all the greatest companies kind of understand this and, uh, the advantage that distributed teams have is that they have to figure this stuff out faster. Um, and I think it’s actually a strategic advantage for that reason.

Joe:

17:48

Yeah, I really like that’s a good point, kind of remote work that there are some advantages that of smaller companies that may start remote kind of build, have to build that culture quicker and be kind of scrappy. To kind of create that connection, which can, you know, for my next foundation. For when you do have the 100 people on the same floor?

Aiden:

18:16

Yeah, 100%. I think, like it’s ah, it’s almost like I know I hate to put it this way, but it’s almost like a crutch. Three ability to be in the same office allows you to be sloppier than you would be if you were not in the same office And so it just means that there has to be more clarity. There has to be better goals. Has to feel these things, because otherwise, you know, you just can’t get into a room randomly and start talking about Hey, what you know. So you should have to have a lot more rigor. And I think ultimately old company should have that. You don’t need to be remote in order to have those things. Great companies do that, even when they’re five people, and they’re all in the same room. But it’s just like it’s a forcing function. And so it requires people to operate at a higher level of communication efficiency from the get go

Joe:

19:06

definitely, um, one last kind of question. It’s a little bit unrelated to the path that we kind of went down, but I kind of what we talked about. I think it’s been great. Um, what do you What do you think is kind of the future of the what? What is the modern workplace look like now? And what? What is it? Kind of look like, um, you know, five years from now.

Aiden:

19:31

Yeah. So I think the main thing that that’s going to start happening is I feel that we have one of the things we’ve gotten very like hardcore fast towards this. This concept of real time, everything. And, uh, this could be problematic because, you know, in a sense that, like everyone is bombarded with notifications. You know, we kind of started in a world where, uh, you know, first email existed, and then there was a lots of email and then, like, email was flooded and everyone has an email problem. And now what’s happened is like we have so many more ways to communicate on a lot of those ways to communicate have presented you notification overload. Andi, I think we all live in this notification over load like environment. And I think that’s one of the things that we need to solve. Um, and I think five years from now, you know, things become a lot more structured. Um, people communicate better and much more efficiently. Communications will turn to be more effective because people again no, went to communicate on what channels and when it’s a lot of this stuff has to be figured out, you know, What we’re hearing is that a lot of people for example, are resorting to using messaging platforms almost like email in the sense that they will, you know, check these messy performs they once at nine ones at noon, like once and five versus, like that instant aspect of it, Just like this desire to basically communicate in a more, um, I guess effective pace. That kind of get gets away, basically reducing clutter on and focusing on, like, more effective communication. I think that’s one of the main things unlocked, even more productive ity across organizations everywhere.

Joe:

21:27

Yeah, I think it makes a lot of sense. Well, thanks for joining us today. Aiden is awesome talking about kind of remote future work and how things were looking, um, excited to kind of test out fellow and definitely take a look. If anyone is, you know, in the market for some, um, improvement of employee engagement and really connecting the management thio, um, employee base?

Aiden:

21:54

Yeah, definitely. This was, uh this was a lot of fun. Thanks for having me.

Joe:

21:58

Absolutely. Thanks, man. Okay. Thanks for joining the DNA Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create fear Customer joined the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud up the instant business communication tool used to create instantly share a bowl videos, screenshots and gifts perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Talking content and experience with NFL content lead Joey Buskirk

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. I am so excited to chat today with a guest. His name is Joey. He works with the NFL and Joey and I connected over Social. And I thought he had a really cool role and background and so I definitely wanted to bring him in to chat today about his experience and how it kind of plays out in digital and how you can kind of bring in a customer, uh, into your environment and creating experience for them and definitely have it lead to some loyalty. So Joey, why don’t you give us a little quick background on yourself? And, um, then we’ll go into some questions.

Joey:

01:02

Great. Thanks, Joe. I’m Joey as Joe mentioned. I work for the NFL as the manager of club content strategy, but ultimately I’m a league employee, but I worked with all 32 clubs on a daily basis on digital strategy as it pertains to digital and social platforms so I really focus on long form video that you see on TV. But over the years of social strategy, I see a lot of various things that have to do with how we can best optimize all of the club’s platforms. So obviously working with 30 franchises, it is all very variable as how I approached the Bangles is gonna be different from how I approach Patriots. Just to name two examples. Yeah, that’s a rundown of who I am. I mean, at the end of the day in telling the story through data is really what I focus on a daily basis.

Joe:

02:04

Yeah, I think that’s kind of how a lot of people have moved in towards the directions and marketing is really kind of creating that connection point with content data. I ran this survey on Twitter probably like, two months ago and I said if you could only have one, which would you have content or data. And the survey actually ended up 50 50, so I thought it was pretty interesting. We live in a world full of distractions and slack notifications and email and social. How can you kind of cut through that as a brand and create that experience?

Joey:

02:53

Yeah, you kind of get there. But I heard we live in a world full of distractions, and I think that was one right there.

Joe:

03:00

But…

Joey:

03:02

Yeah, I mean, on the clubs and how they how they stand out. I think that a lot of folks are aware of their social presence. And I think I want to sprinkle a few club examples into this because, uh, you know, I really think that that would make my points come across, you know, as best as I can. So I think that originality, that’s something that is thrown out quite a bit. But a club staying true to their brand? Uh, well, you know, having a good time at the same time is huge, I think, showcasing player personalities. A lot of clubs do a phenomenal job, you know, really going behind the helmet to attract the casual fan. I

Joe:

03:50

think they were

Joey:

03:51

in a different position with, you know, with all the players having equipment on it’s not that easy to to really see them and get to know them as it is with basketball players, for example. But really, going behind the helmet and looking at the personalities of all these well known players has really been drawing fans and especially ones that aren’t necessarily, you know, massive football fans in the first place. One thing I wanted to be is authentic and truthful, I think something that really is thrown around quite a bit. I mean, I know that that’s not new news for brands of all types, but for brands like the NFL in clubs in general. One example is the Browns, when they had one win a couple years ago, they were honest with her fans. They took an approach where they weren’t, you know, they weren’t trying to make anything seem as it, you know, you know, pulling strings to making fans think something different. They were very, very straightforward in there. A little bit of self degradation, being honest with who they are, where they’re at in, you know, with their but it’s huge to really make fans feel like they can trust you. You know. And in that developing your voice, bringing in the human element. The Chargers do a phenomenal job on social. Doing your best, to develop your voice, developed your brand and stay true to who you are. And I think the clubs are doing a great jump like that.

Joe:

05:43

Great. That was really good answer. I like what you said about kind of bringing that unique, that unique experience, that really only you can provide for the consumer, which is, you know, that in game in, helmet miked up, locker room stuff that people really want to see behind the scenes and kind of get the feel of the team that they’re cheering for. There’s so much content and so many holes you can go down. How do you try and prioritize which things to show and which ones are working out?

Joey:

06:33

Yeah. I mean, I think that that’s a good point, because obviously when it comes to a content execution. It’s not necessarily gonna be. Everyone says content is king, and that’s true. But it’s the idea of content that’s King. And what I mean by that is it’s how you distribute that. Because how you know how you take one specific content piece on distributed is how you’re gonna really get fans to latch on. For example, if you’re creating, if you and used example of McCaffrey running back for the Panthers because he’s just months he had a great fantasy, but a long form piece that you did behind the scenes with him. Um, you’re gonna you’re gonna approach that differently when you’re thinking of posting it to YouTube, as opposed to posting it to Twitter, posting it on Instagram stories. It’s really about the avenue in which you get this content of fan. So you know, when I approach a piece of content, it’s really looking at it. It’s not a one size fits all, you know format anymore. It’s kind of catering. It’s a one too many approach. And so one thing that I stress quite a bit, you know, when working with clubs and they’re all very, very well equipped and know this already. But it’s work with, you know, they’re distributing content in the right way. 6 to 8 minute videos on YouTube as opposed to eclipse on Twitter things. Things of that nature

Joe:

08:09

Cool? Yes, we really kind of just find ways to slice and dice it based on the medium. You take that one long form piece and turn it into a blog post or report and have a YouTube video and some social pieces. You really get that content efficiency. Going with that? Like how? Convince Jewel’s and video You mentioned YouTube and some other things. How can visuals and video in the day and age we have now really enhance or improve, um, content you’re putting out?

Joey:

08:56

Yeah. So how video enhances the consumer experience. I mean, one thing I wanted to mention is if done right. You know, video and visual imagery can really strike an emotional cord that’s only achievable through that method. Um, you know, music, video, photo like those were the most popular pieces of constant content that are consumed, and it’s because, you know it has the ability to really strike a chord in you that’s emotional. That’s engaging. And we’ve seen, you know, as you’re aware, Major. Well, maybe not, you know, across the board. But when it comes to the league and the clubs we’ve seen major year over year in pieces when it comes to, you know, video being consumed as opposed to photo and article on, and that just continues to grow. So visuals and video enhance. Of course, I think that sometimes quality, you know, if you can really create something of quality, like the Vikings, for example, I bring them up quite a bit because they create beautiful pieces of video very, very well done. I’m always totally captivated by what they do. But then, on another, you know, sometimes things in its simplest form is just as effective when it comes to be a raw, uncut footage of, you know, a player grabbing your phone at the end of the game. We got that w on and then posting it straight to your feed, while the feeling of excitement after a win, is still wrong. It’s still real, you know. Again, it goes back to what I just mentioned before. It’s catering to your audience, catering to the platform that you’re posting that it’s really taken advantage is it’s not always about making beautiful as you want to make it. Sometimes it’s, um, but then it’s also about, you know, really capture that emotional aspect as well.

Joe:

10:56

Yeah, go into that. Maybe even a little bit more like speed over quality, where you are specifically working with the clubs? And you know when you have in game action happening. Um, how do you kind of get something out there fast if people are like following it on Twitter or some other medium versus like, you know, having that quality piece kind of driving something?

Joey:

11:37

Yeah, that’s a good question. I think that a big one is in game, right? So I feel like when it comes to Sundays or Mondays and Thursdays, fans just want to know what’s happening. It’s really about this. The social folks are on the field capturing whatever they can, whether it’s the actual highlight or the celebrations surrounding the highlight everything. Pregame, postgame. But like I mentioned before that example of the Chargers, when it comes to the game, it’s It’s just that organic content that happens that you can’t predict. I mean, that’s usually you know, you want to get that up as quickly as possible to cause fans are literally sitting at home in a day and age where not everybody has cable there. And they’re looking to their phones and Twitter and different social platforms to get their updates, not only updates but actual, players and from the style and making them feel like they’re a part of the game. So when it comes to, uh, you know, the longer form pieces of content, the episodic pieces of content, those air over a long period of time, that those air incredibly popular and obviously very vital to a club. But those were you know, we find a lot of training camp, episodic pieces or episodic, and what I mean by that is really high quality video that you, you know, of things, specifically a lot of stuff in season, but a lot of offseason content as well, when there’s not as much happening, feel so again. It’s clubs have different video teams in different capabilities, but I think it really goes down in season. There’s a lot more of that speed, raw video. Let’s just get it up, Let’s go, let’s connect with fans .And then, uh, you know, I think for that for the rest of the week and on the off season when you have a little bit more time to fine tune. But I guess it’s all about balance of having both because fans want one.

Joe:

13:58

Yeah, that’s that’s really cool. I mean, can you provide a structure to like, real time stuff, like I know when I was in like, a war room for kind of like we’re chatting a little bit before where when I was with Adobe, we put out this Super Bowl content, you know, that was referenced by a lot of top tier like press outlets. And so we were planning like to do this Realtor time review of commercials because our Super Bowl was very ad focused. So it was like, This is what people these are the ads people want to see and global. So it was kind of like I knew when the commercials were coming out, and so I had, like, my process to like respond and put date out there. Is there, like, a little bit of an editorial real time calendar where you’re like, OK, if someone gets a touchdown, this is the process. Or someone gets, you know, a game changing highlight or wherever this the process? Or is it very much just like based on experience and less about kind of like a process?

Joey:

15:22

What I know from my experience. You know, I was just in London for a couple of the games at Wembley and, you know, over the years, you know, whether it’s Super Bowl or whether it’s going to the game. I mean, I wish I can, you know, like, go into detail for you, But as somebody that works with all clubs is more of a consultant to the clubs, you know, process with every day. So I think that although I’m aware of what happens in various front from club, sure, that’s been my process. Whether you know, whether whether you’re posting in real time and you have any any holes to jump through and you have sign off, you know, do right, this will all right, you have, You know, the powers that be that they want to have more of a checks and balances that’s really on a club by club basis in order to, you know, really, really do what they feel is fast. So go to maybe that set that more of a

Joe:

16:28

Yeah, that makes sense. So outside like recent good experience you’ve had with a brand and you know, was if it was, like retail like, what was the process like, what made it stand out to you? Did it make you more of a loyal customer? What? What kind of experience you’ve had in your own life?

Joey:

16:53

Yeah, so I have, like, this is very basic. But you know, yesterday I ordered a baseball mitt from my nephew and a coloring book for my niece, and it was there within 16 hours. And the efficiency and the speed and what which Amazon used to deliver all for a relatively small fee once a year is incredible. I’ve had great experiences with them. When it comes on a different level, I’m a massive Lakers fan, huh? I just went to a game a week ago with couple of buddies and I was blown away by their game experience, you know? And of course I’m a bit biased, but I’ve been to a lot of live games and, uh, just just from the way that they you know how to containment set up to the lighting, to the temperature in the arena, to the customer service to the food. I mean, you pay a pretty penny, but this was just quite the experience, and they really I think that they’re also so a lot more personal with how they keep hearing to people and fans in game. So they have an app that you can get. I don’t agree. I went because I was, you know, wanted to focus on the game. Necessarily. Someday I had how it would work. But it’s ultimately a game where you could really be involved in send real time photos and send updates and predictions so that you could, uh, you know, so you can stay in tune with what’s happening and get them and then the late game make you went back for more. So, you know, I think one thing that I won’t go into details about, but that we were, you know, a lot on with the clubs is in game experiences. You know? How do you personalize them? To make fans want to come because it’s becoming. It’s easier to sit on our coach or where, ever that maybe you could watch live games on your breast, depending on where you are, you know, are watching what you know, coming up with different ways to get fans to want to actually go immerse themselves in the experience? That’s that’s a huge thing. Some clubs have no problem selling tickets for years to come, and others you know about harder to think so. I just wanted to bring up the Lakers because it really stood as a really awesome experience.

Joe:

19:36

Cool. Yeah, I and I agree with you. I think sports is in a unique situation where you may have a new person. Everything. Well, you will have a new person every game, right? You’re not. You don’t have the same people at every single game. And it could be that person’s first time. Um, you know what? There is Ah, time we’re growing up with, like, Michael Jordan. And obviously I’m in Utah. Some I’m a jazz guy with Karl Malone and John Stockton, but I remember Michael Jordan saying that he tried to play for, like, the kid that came to see him play that had never seen an NBA game before. So it’s not. It’s on, like the player level where they, like, hopefully perform and aren’t like sitting out a game. It’s for load management or whatever, but it’s also it’s also on the teams, you know, to provide that experience like you said and really make it for people to come back. So I think that’s that’s a really interesting point.

Joey:

20:49

My company in 2016. I you know, uh, me and my wife went to see owe me one last time and so that was kind of brutal, but yeah, I mean, it’s totally feel what you’re saying. It’s yeah, no, making it a lot of So how do you get a big comeback?

Joe:

21:16

Awesome. Well, Joey, I think we could talk all day. It’s been great having you on. Maybe we’ll have to do it again soon and talk a little bit more. I hope everyone has a good Thanksgiving holiday and, uh, enjoy the rest of your week. Thanks, man. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App screen recorder , screenshot tool, and GIFmaker; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

Customer service is a key piece of customer experience. How to turn detractors into promoters

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Today we will talk about customer experience as it relates to customer service. So I, um, I kind of was inspired a little bit by this with seeing that Apple had released another update to its IOS 13 platform. That makes I think, five since it was released, and that kind of, um, made me feel good as it’s a company that has unlimited resources and still has to put products out, maybe a little early. Then they’re ready and do a lot of bug fixes, and patch is definitely at Cloud App. We’ve, you know, had some product updates this year that we put out and have had to do some updates and other things. And, you know, with that comes a lot of people complaining when things are broken, which is rightfully so, cause you kind of get used to having a product working and then when it doesn’t it makes it really hard. So, um, I saw some examples of some good ways to kind of manage that, um, from both your company’s side and also your customer side. It’s that we’re all customers as well as business runners. So kind of, obviously, the old adage put yourself in the customer shoes is helpful. We’ve all had an experience where a product hasn’t worked or a service that we had signed up for wasn’t working. And we’ve had to engage with customer service or connect with someone from that company to fix the problem. And one thing I loved that I saw from the Cloud App CEO, Scott Smith, this past week is we had some outages with Cloud App with some of our servers and he personally reached out to a few people, you know, that we’re very dissatisfied and upset. Rightfully so. And he said, Hey, you know, let’s do a quick zoom call and connect, and you know, I can hopefully answer any of your questions and concerns that you’re dealing with. Um, that’s kind of the first thing is, don’t shy away from that conflict. Um, know that if you’re a sass business but also in retail and travel in every industry, you’re gonna run into issues. It’s not always going to be perfect customers are going to be upset of things. And, um, I think expectations on the customer side have never been higher for sass and other retail business. As everyone’s putting a focus on experience, so know that those conflicts they’re gonna come up and don’t shy away from them. Don’t just sweep them under the rug or think that if you don’t respond, it’ll go away. It usually just festers. Um, so we have ah customer support team here at Cloud App, and they’re, you know, working regular business hours and not working weekends currently. So we aren’t, you know, we’re a small company, so we don’t have 24/7 customer support quite yet, like a lot of large companies might. And so sometimes we’ll get people that will reach out like on a Friday afternoon, and they won’t get touched in the queue. And then, you know, they’ll kind of stew over the weekend and maybe complain on social networks and things. So that’s definitely not something we want to have. But when that does happen and it will, um, try and connect with those people 1 to 1 and see how you can make things better. So a couple of tips are allowing the people to talk. Um, don’t try. And a lot of times, you know, it’s actually a little bit like a marriage or relationship. Is that sometimes, um, either party doesn’t necessarily want something immediately fixed. Some things they just want to be listened to so allow customers to talk. Um, definitely being a mindset of caring as that of Cloud App, you know, for such a small company, we have around three million users, but, you know, we need every single one of them. Feedback is critical to kind of us advancing and growing, and we need kind of those loyal customers. And so we have kind of a cultural of care, a culture of caring, because we really can’t lose those customers. We need them. Um, and we want them. We want them to be a part of what we’re growing over here. Definitely used the good use good tone, um, and try to be neutral to everything and don’t react So you don’t want it to turn into an experience where you’re taking things personally. Um, you kind of need to take your mind set out of the product is your baby and you’re trying to defend it. So put yourself in a user perspective of Hey, you know, this cost me time and money in my business. And, you know, that’s not something I want to be acceptable. Um, have full attention and focus. If you’re like on a zoom call with a customer or connecting with someone, have your slack notifications turned off, um, be focused and attentive and really, um, look for ways to connect directly. Um, one thing also is really trying to move those angry conversations which happened a lot of the time on, um, social media these days is moving those to a different forum, making a little bit more private. You can move those to a 1 to 1 like phone call on zoom, or if you can take care of it on email, find a place that you can have more of Ah, 1 to 1 conversation versus them. Having a one too many conversation. Um, I like, uh, this tip I learned from Oracle while go to, um was to set limits. So It’s good to have kind of established time limit that you can have and understand that you both are gonna try and resolve that conflict and then have established, like, next step. So if you aren’t able to resolve the concern or fix the issue on the phone call or on zoom caller over, you know have next step. So they don’t feel like basically soaking build momentum. So you want to be able to have your conversation and then have it continually to resolve. Um, so like I mentioned the other day, Scott was talking with a customer, and he’s great. But, you know, doing this 1 on 1 was able to resolve the concerns. And then, um, you know, those persons become loyalists again, Like we’ve had people where Scott’s done this. Our customer support team has done this and they will delete their social post or they’ll re post on social and say, Hey, you know, I was upset at Cloud App and I’ve resolved everything and still very loyal customer. So it provides that opportunity to really turn that direct detractor like I mentioned into a loyalist. Um and that’s what you really want. You know you want to have a customer focus business where you’re really driving on feedback and your road map is tied to that. And it really provides some urgency to not have a lot of downtime because, you know, you want to continually focus and provide that value to your customers so that they want to keep using you and kind of grow with you. So, um, to kind of recap a couple of tips is definitely allow the customer to talk. Show you care, Use good tone. Um, focus. Try not to react. Um, look for ways that you can connect with them and provide next steps and make sure that the issue is resolved, and then you have clear next steps for them. So they aren’t, you know, feeling maybe like it wasn’t resolved. And then they try and connect with you again on email and you aren’t responsive. Could end up being worse than it was before. So those things can all be helpful to build that experience and help people at the, you know, really bottom of the funnel, where, um, they’ve hopefully had a good experience through all the other pass. And then once you get to customer support. You’re, you know, immediately resolving those concerns so that they can be a helpful customer and can help continue to contribute to the value of your business. So hopefully those things are helpful. Definitely add to conversation if you have any comments and look forward to talking to you all again next week. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

5 customer experiences you have to nail as a brand

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Hey, good morning. From the Cloud App offices in Draper, Utah, I’m excited to chat a little bit today about customer experience and five places along the customer journey. You really have to be able to make sure that you keep a loyal customer fan base. This kind of stems from experience I recently had. So, uh, as a dad of three little kids, I don’t often buy myself clothes. I buy them clothes and my wife clothes and I had a gift card to Patagonia. And so I thought, I’m gonna use this and maybe get a couple of extra things from the gift card and get myself some some clothes. So I ordered the clothes and had a seamless experience on the website. Um, the clothes arrived and they were great. They fit fine. I did kind of the initial wash, and one of the shirts ended up getting kind of bleeding. The ink bled and stained the shirt, so I called Patagonia and told them the issue. And within five minutes they had sent me a new shirt and the UPS label to send the other shirt back. So that was kind of the experience that I built kind of this, um, five tips off of, but really kind of the first experience that you need to nail is awareness. So obviously you need people to actually, no, um, what your company is. So, you know, we live in a world of Google searches, Facebook re targeted ads, YouTube, pre roll clips. Are you showing up there? How are people finding you? Um, and how are they kind of experiencing you? Um, how you show up in marketing and how you show up in content really kind of define who you are as a brand. So put some effort into that awareness piece. Definitely put some time and effort into building that. And awareness is to part it is initially brand, but it’s also that awareness will kind of build on itself and create leads and generate business for for your company. Um, so obviously Patagonia had a pretty established brand, so I knew it to probably expect from them from decades of ads and marketing that I’ve seen from them. Um, but you, if you’re a new company or kind of a startup or or an established company, continue to build that credibility with content partnerships. Integrations can really help you establish that great awareness. The second experience is purchases, visits, download, sign up. So I kind of broke this out into a few different things because it fits in for both retail and understanding how people are first finding you and then how they’re translating to an actual customer. I loved what shot Noona Ryan, the CEO of Adobe, said a couple of years that it will be some are a couple of years ago in Adobe Summit when I was there, he said, people buy experiences, not products. Um, and I believe that I think we’re kind of in the experience age where people, um you know, we live in an Amazon world, and so people have expectations from what Amazon, Apple, and Adobe lots of these companies have produced. And so we have expectations of of what companies who aren’t as established and don’t have the resource is their branding can produce for us. So once you hit the awareness piece and a lead lands on your site, um, hopefully you have a good experience waiting for them. Some of those keys I’ve I’ve added for the purchase phase is kind of site navigation. So how quickly can they find, um, find your product, find how to download it, find how to use it. Efficiency to value. So if you’re a sass product, how quickly is your user getting to value? Um, analyze kind of your step process. And if there’s way too many steps in the sign up process, uh, do you look for ways to optimize that and cut down on how quickly they can get to value additive up sales? Um, are there things that they could be using that would make the experience even better? Um, and then set expectations and provide training. So, uh, if you’re like a heavier weight tool like, um, you know, like an adobe analytics or something that may take some time to implement on the back end before you get to value, then set expectations for that. If your tool like Cloud App that you can get value within a minute and expectations for how to achieve that and how to how to hit that first trigger. Um, experience number three is a rival. So they’ve, um Let’s use the Patagonian example. So you know the brand. You hit the website, you order something, then the package arrives. It would be you find someone on a Google search, you hit their website, you download the product now. Now what? So with retail, obviously it comes down to packaging. One thing I loved about, um, low about Apple is their packaging. I think they’re one of the best at it, and it makes it kind of an unboxing experience every time you buy something, um, Amazon does a great job of kind of adding that additional branding to their to their plain cardboard boxes. Um, my wife and I usually get Christmas cards from Shutterfly, and they have there bright orange kind of branded packaging. Shout out to my old my old boss, the CMO at Shutterfly. Mickey Miracle for doing that. Um, but with with SAS, it’s really how quickly and how easily someone can use your product. So, uh, I’ll use cloud app as an example, we try to provide immediate ease of use when you download it. There’s instructions on how to kind of get installed. We have a wealth of how to videos and things to immediately get to value. And then when you use the product and take a screenshot, it’s then quickly saved to your clipboard so you can use it. Number three. Um, maybe one of the most exporting important experiences, though, is experienced Number four, which is support. And this is really where Patagonia kind of won me over Experiences one through three were kind of what I would expect from retail experience. Um, it was easy to probably to really find what I needed. Shipping was free and the clothes arrived, you know, within 5 to 7 days is expected, but then support is there when something goes wrong. So, uh, if you mess up experience number four, then it can negate any success you have with experiences two and three. So having a team that’s ready to validate and expound and help people in support can can really advance things. I love the story about Jeff Bezos being less than satisfied about wait times during the holidays. And he had an executive team meeting and called out one of his VPs who was leading customer support and actually called customer support while they were in the meeting. Um, and he ended up having to wait around four minutes for the call, and he wanted to be under a minute. Um, and you know, it led to, Ah, a really good exercise on how to improve that and a conversation. So with support, it’s all about listening, finding ways to help customers succeed. Um, with a product it’s all about dog food in your own products. So using it a lot and really trying to find those bugs before they occur and and finding those friction points and being at Adobe was always called Adobe on Adobe. So we were the largest users of our own products, and we would find, you know, issues with them and and try and improve them. Um, and then customer feedback is really key. So without a customer feedback loop, you’re not gonna have success in bringing the product that your customers want. Advisory boards out reaching the power users, regular customer testing. They’re all crucial components, being active with your support and not always being reactive. So, um, those air some things I’ve found that a really key with customer experience. Three. Pass along the journey. So there’s awareness making sure that people can actually find you, Um, and how your brand comes across. In those instances, two is purchased. Visit, download and sign up. So when people hit your sight, what experience are they having? How quickly can they get to value? Um, three is arrival. So how, um, are you actually showing up once they’ve made a purchase decision and then lastly, support. So really making sure that you’re nailing support, um, following Jeff Bezos and trying to get speed and accuracy. Um, and those things will really be helpful in leading customer experience. And making sure your business is full of loyal customers versus always having to spend those high acquisition costs. So I hope that this is some good, uh, thoughts for everyone and that it will be helpful in building a customer experience focused business. Thank you. And I hope you all have a good day. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

All

Productivity at work is possible

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Joe:


00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Hello. I am so excited to chat with everyone today a little bit about productivity. It’s based on this article that I wrote called Let’s See, there it is productivity at work. It is possible. Definitely check out the article that focuses on different tips and tricks. I’ve kind of learned along the way for myself and pulled from, um, different people I’ve worked with and put them together in this in this one post for people to take a look at. So the biggest thing for me on productivity is that we kind of live in this always connected world right now. And, um, you know, we have these open office spaces where it’s easy to get distracted. There’s all kinds of of tools that can help with productivity, and it’s kind of like where do I start? Um, for me kind of taking on this. This new role of Cloud App has added to the complexity of my inbox at work. It’s added to, uh, a little bit more on prioritization of what I need to get done. That’s really being effective and driving our business, managing a team, that and how they’re kind of focusing their energies on things that could be valuable for us. So it’s definitely brought up a lot of need for finding ways to be productive and using the best best use of my time. So one of the biggest things for me and I’ve added these tips in this block post is to create a to do list to improve productivity at work. So, um, nothing new there. It’s a pretty common thing where people will give a tip too right your to do list and kind of review that each day. Um, and there’s a There’s a real power to checking things off of your to do list. Um, it’s kind of proven psychologically and mentally to give you a little bit of at Adobe, um, hit and help you to kind of push forward on other things so there’s a real value in not just doing a task, but writing it down and checking it off with kind of the same vein is starting with the tough tasks first. So, you know, in kind of going back to when I was in school, even, you know, k through 12. I always tried to do my my hard work early. I was never like a Oh, this massive project due tomorrow. Um, I need to start doing it. I was always kind of like, uh oh, This project’s due a month from now. Well, I’m gonna kind of do little bits and pieces of this big rock task and get that completed. Big Rock is from Stephen Covey Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. And it’s basically like if you look a jar and you fill it up with big rocks first, then you’ll be able to put in the little pebbles and also sand and still have space versus if you fill up a bucket with sand first, there’d be no space for anything else. So doing those big rocks first has been expected for me to kind of get those big projects done, and then I can delay kind of doing some of the smaller tasks and the whirlwind stuff that kind of comes up. One thing I talked about last week, is not being afraid to say no or not yet, I think that’s a skill you kind of learn along the way. I remember when I kind of first started working in Adobe. I definitely said yes to everything and that, you know, helped me to build relationships and rapport so I think there’s space when you’re kind of establishing your credibility with your career, to say yes to a lot of things. But you also need to be able to know how to say no and build that skill. Scott Smith, CEO of Cloud App, said that you know, not everything needs to be filled, fulfilled by the CEO or fulfilled by you. You can try and delegate or, um delay a project and say, You know what? This is really important to us right now. Let’s focus on something else until we have time for that. The next idea is the Paradoe Principle, which is the 80 20 rule. So 80% of the results probably come from 20% of the work, so find out really where the results are coming from and really make sure you’re focusing your time there first and then what I liked at Adobe and also this is a Google thing as well is creating that 10 to 25% of your time focused on a new creative venture. Um, so looking for opportunities is a project I want to work on that will have some value six months to a year from now and could turn into something when I was around this program at Adobe called The Social Swarm, which was not a part of my job. But what I did is I brought in people from sales product marketing coms, and we kind of brainstormed new ideas for a marketing campaign. And that way it was kind of like different viewpoints. It also kind of benefited other things we were working on. And it was a lot of fun to do as well. The next thing is to automate when possible, as an analyst at heart. I would always try and find things I can automate in excel or sequel and eliminate, you know, mundane tasks that I was doing. So sometimes you can find tools out there that can automate things for you and just make things a little better. Um, one thing I’ve been using recently is superhuman, and it’s an email kind of program, and it helps with my kind of cranking through my email and making sure I’m being efficient with it. Um, I can remind myself, you know, when you respond to people and it kind of eliminates a lot of the energy of spending on email, So I’ve been grateful for that. Um, definitely give yourself breaks. When I was at Adobe, you know, I had that beautiful campus, and so I’d go work out kind of during the day. Here, at Cloud Up we have ah, you know, a smaller office. So I’ll get up every now and again and go walk outside or just take a little break. Take it away from my desk. You’ll find that times that you are mindful will really give you that opportunity, to improve yourself, be creative and learn and grow. Um, there’s also this technique called the Pomodoro technique, and I actually haven’t tried this, but I know a lot of people who have, and it says you basically set a timer for 25 minutes. Um, you work for 25 minutes and then take a five minute break when the timer goes off and add a checkmark two piece of paper. Once you have about four check marks, you shift your break to 15 to 20 minutes allows you to focus really directly on something, get it done and not be distracted with slack or email or text messages or whatever. So that’s something that’s kind of interesting that you can research or look into to see if it works for you and lastly, well not lastly, one more thing after this, but really get enough rest and try and avoid distractions. I have the opportunity to interview Nir for the podcast. DNA, even experience and near talked a lot about avoiding distraction and time, blocking out your calendar and having really focused efforts on certain things. So check out his book, Distractible. If that’s something that interests, you. He’s also on Episode one of this podcast that I interviewed him on about getting enough rest. So uh, no. Take the TV out of your bedroom. Um, put your phone down, give your eyes a break from that blue screen and make sure your brain is kind of getting enough sleep at night and able to kind of focus in the morning. And really, I touched on this a little bit, but finding technologies that can really help you. So I mentioned superhuman and Cloud App is definitely one of those productivity tools. If you search productivity apps, you’ll see Block Post. We did right at the top of organic search for Google, and it shows nine productivity apps that we recommend to fit what you need and do and trying to find ways to integrate those into yourself and your business. And really, it comes down to, you know, there’s millions of techniques to be more productive and find success with that during the day. But you really have to find out what is going to be, help you be successful, what’s gonna work for you and then always be willing, you know, to pass that on to other people. I think there’s a real power in helping other people people be productive, and that can really benefit yourself and how you feel about your own productivity. So take a look at this, uh, blog post that I wrote. It’s called Productivity at work, it is possible you should be able to find it. Um, and hopefully some of these techniques will help you. And also check out some of the apps I mentioned that you can integrate into your business. Have a great day, and we’ll talk again soon. Thank you. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting Cloud App; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Saying no can be a key to creating an experience

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA of an Experience Podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. Today I want to talk a little bit about the art of saying no both to your customers, yourself and your co workers. This is kind of based off of fast company article that Scott Smith, the CEO of Cloud Up, contributed to. I thought I had some really interesting insights and thought I’d bring in some of the only things that I’ve learned as well. So starting off, Um, I think one of the cool things was starting off with your why this was from Nick Martin, CEO of Joe Coffey. He sounded. He said, If you find yourself trying to talk yourself into an opportunity or reevaluating waiting, reevaluating the principles for decision making that I’ve gotten you this far double down on your why and I think this is something that I’ve really tried to do is kind of committing to a strategy on the, Really not evaluating it, um, you know, weekly, but really committing to how you’re growing things how you’re gonna layer things on. And that can really help. You know what to say no. To, um, I’ve heard from a lot of friends who have gone to some tech companies, both here in Utah and then also in the Bay Area, who were really frustrated when their companies would change their strategies every few months. And it would be like if we feel like we had put all this effort into a strategy and then, you know, we had changed that so quickly. Um, that’s maybe one thing that I there’s kind of maybe a middle ground between enterprise and start up where startups, you can kind of move quickly and adapt. Um, but maybe those air smaller things to a larger strategy, um, so committed to that strategy and then being able to know you’re why you’re doing that and that will kind of help lead to saying no to new things that may come up. Um, that can also at coming from adobe and then also here at cloud app. I think we stay committed to a customer driven product road map. But if you’re always seeing, yes, two people wanting new features or benefits from your product. You’re never gonna catch up. There’s never changes you can make. You’re never gonna satisfy everybody. Um, You know, hopefully you’re making the changes that will satisfy the masses and will bring value to the most amount of people. But chances are updates you make that really make certain people happy will maybe anger other people. So you really have to, uh, um be able to kind of delay. Yes. Um, say, you know, that’s something that we are really focused on in the future. But at the moment, we’re working on a few other pressing issues. Um, stay tuned type of thing. And when you’re really up front and honest with people, your customers like that, I think it brings a new level of experience for them where they kind of feel a little bit more ownership in your product. Um, and people from my experience really respect when you’re honest with them like that, where, um, you can say why you might want not want to focus on a certain product update or not. And I really found it cool to see companies that put their road maps up on like public trail oh boards. Cloud App does that. I’ve seen a lot of other companies do that where you can literally just log into a trail aboard and see kind of what’s coming up next. Um, the next way to kind of say no is, uh, Niles Matisse in CEO of Minute, which is a smart home alarm Said is to really reflect on the objective. So, uh, you know, time is money, especially when you’re a CEO or or leading a team or something. Every decision you make really takes a toll and opportunity cost on other decisions that you could be spending your time on. So rather than look far ahead in the calendar for some white space, uh, Niles ask himself whether he would want to take this meeting tomorrow, and he says, If the answer is not, then I probably won’t want to take it in three weeks from now. So that is how he’s kind of leading his ability to say no to people. Um, what? And then, ah, Martin, Nick Martin came back again and said, um, that you need to not get distracted, which is something that I mentioned, um, staying the course and really trying to double down on things that are are working well and things that, um being able to cut things that aren’t But they’re all part of, ah, larger strategy. So you’re not totally changing a campaign or a strategy. You really just changing little pieces of it and testing pieces of it That can really help you to know and stay focused and be able to say no. Um, Sarah Raffa, who Cofounded coterie, which sells and delivers party kits. Um, she says she recommends setting boundaries and sticking to them. Um, sometimes, you know, that coffee meeting could be a quick call or that call could be an email. You can use tools like Cloud App to shoot a quick video to eliminate that meeting. But really like looking your calendar and wondering if if you really need to be in that meeting, Um, this is something that was really valuable for me at Adobe is that I’d get pulled into a lot of meetings and it started kind of dominant my calendar and I started to kind of look at those meetings and wonder if I actually really needed to be there or if I could, um, have a team member Go for me. Who? Who could kind of, uh, we could, you know, divide and conquer, or if I didn’t really need to go at all. Um, or if I could just kind of reduce that meeting. One thing I loves doing. Waas If I had a meeting, especially if it was someone that I worked with frequently, Um, I do 15 or 45 versus 30 and 60 minute meetings. So you’d be amazed at how quickly you can cut down on your time spent in meetings by doing things like that. And recently, um, some data that cloud app pulled in a survey that will be coming out in a couple of weeks was that the average U. S based office worker spends about two hours a day in meetings. So finding ways to cut that out, um, and reduce as much as possible can really be helpful. I also love doing standing meetings to reduce those things. So, uh, that can really help you. You know, really? Managing your calendar and knowing what is really valuable with your time can help you to say no. Um, Scott, the CEO of Cloud App said, Remember that you don’t always have to deliver a hard No, if it seems like a good fit, you can ask your team to investigate it, uh, and then kind of come in later on. If there’s an opportunity to be delegated and kind of expand the pie a little bit, then that can also be helpful. Um, and he says, also, you’d be surprised how easily you can delay certain opportunities. Um, so there can be something that’s like, You know what? I really do want to invest in this conference or this speaking opportunity or this collaboration or partnership, But we just don’t have the resource is right now. Can we keep this warm and chat in six months? Um, just kicking it down the road and keeping in touch and not totally saying no to those things, but more like a no. Maybe I can, uh, no, not right now, but no, yes, potentially in the future can be really helpful in improving that experience for yourself and your people you work with Roman Calista, CEO of Nutrient, said it’s a weird opportunity to learn you might decline an opportunity by saying, Unfortunately, my team can cannot focus on can only focus on building the product and use your feet feedback in the moment. Um, but by playing your cards right, you’re opening yourselves to feed back. There might be a witty, better way to spend my time now on the other person and still convinced me that the meeting will bring value. Um, one thing that we love to do here cloud app is a screen recording tool that enables instant business communication. And any time I get a sales pitch, which is several times a week, if there’s one that I think might be interesting, I reply back to them and I say, This looks interesting. Why don’t you record a pitch for me using cloud app and show me and kind of how your product works or how this service works? Um, and then I can evaluate further and that way. For me, it provides an opportunity for exposure for the product, but also it kind of weeds out those who are kind of just sending out an automated e mail and trying to get engaged that way with the people that are really putting active effort into selling to your company. Um, and that’s proved to be pretty successful. So I think, you know, there’s a lot of value that could be gained by saying no to, uh, customers to employees, Um, teammates and even yourself sometimes definitely stick to a strategy, be invested in that and kind of have an understanding of the broad goals and re evaluate every quarter or annually, depending on your size, and then be willing to kind of delay things if you see there’s an opportunity and definitely delegate. So I think those things have all been helpful in learning how to say no to those things. And hopefully those and anything that, um, I get suggestions on in the future can help each of you to learn how to say no and take more control of your calendar and your strategy. Have a great day and we will talk again soon. Thanks. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your Customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Remote work tips

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA of an Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Hey, today I’m excited to talk about remote work and some tips I’ve learned along the way. So, um, Cloud App has about over 50% of our employee base is remote. We provide, you know, a remote tool solution where people can share things visually through screenshots and GiFs or screen recordings and be able to pass that information along visually. So a couple of things that I’ve learned along the way from working here cloud app and also over the 15 years of my career, where I managed different remote teams across different continents, One of the first things is to meet in person, especially when I was at Adobe. Prior to cloud app, I found that it was so much easier to get things done when I met people in person. So I worked in the Utah office, which was not headquarters, of course, was in San Jose, and I found it that if I was kind of struggling to get something done with either Matrix organization that was I working with or people on my own team that I could fly out there if I hadn’t met him in person. Initially meeting a person scheduled meeting and kind of set up some next steps. And I found that meeting in person at least annually, if not quarterly with my own team or people that I’ve worked frequently with really helped to push those things along for remote work. So it kind of my first tip is to meet in person. I also like to connect virtually as much as possible. There’s some great tools out there. Obviously, Zoom and Adobe used blue jeans, which is another video conferencing tool. Videoconferencing is kind of the standard at the moment, I think, in business to business communication. Um, any time you can see what people are, uh, kind of responding to what you’re talking about with body language and and understanding tone, it can really help you to know how to respond back to them and know how things are being received. So I think videoconferencing is kind of standard, definitely using visuals with like screen recordings and screen shots with cloud app or other tools, like other visual tools, like asana or, um, calendar dot com, where you can kind of share calendars or like air table. You know, those visual tools were even connect with people really help with remote teams. Also, you know, bringing your personality and a channels like slack. I hear all the time people having like a pet channel, or like a just a casual water cool channel, cooler channel. Um, can really help remote workers feel connected to the team if they aren’t in kind of headquarters or the main office and kind of keep those relationships going from from those in person meetings, um, definitely finding or creating experiences together. So when you have those in person meetings, it is with a team that you’re on. Try and go to dinner, go do an activity. Those will be kind of memories that you kind of build back off. Definitely collaboration tools can be a big piece of it. I mentioned a couple cloud app. Slack air table calendar dot com . Um, all those air, great tools that can kind of be visual and connective, collaborative, productive, and give you what you really need do virtual activities. So kind of a simple one is like any type of fantasy sport or March madness. Those kind of connect people, um, find you know what the culture is of your team and find out ways you can connect with each other virtually that could be doing, like some type of gaming, you know, or the fantasy stuff or something else that could really connect you along the way. It also provides a nice way to have, you know, that friendly banter back and forth. Um, one other thing I really like to do was give remote employees the same advantage as H Q employees. So any time I’d run a meeting and had kind of people who work remote or in a different region, I didn’t like to have groups of people in a conference room and then some people remote. So put everyone on the same medium, even if you have. You know, five people in the same office have everyone dial in via zoom or blue jeans or whatever, and then you won’t have kind of that awkwardness of the remote employee feels when they want to speak or kind of get into the conversation, and everyone is kind of in the actual conference room is, you know, kind of dominating the meeting I’ve been that remote employee before. Could be hard to kind of jump in when there’s a conversation in a conference room that you’re not a part of, um, so just put everyone on the same medium, and it makes it a little bit easier as a manager. Definitely lead informal conversations on slack share articles do. I’ve been a part of, like virtual book clubs where we read a book kind of share comments on slack or other places that people can engage with and also be a remote worker advocate. So I think of how remote workers feel. And maybe you worked remote yourself. If you’re going to the office, work remotely once a week, and that will help you to kind of understand what working remotely might be, um, hold regular one on ones. I think this is key to not let your weekly one on ones kind of pass and get cancelled every week. Make that a priority can help kind of bridge the gap. They don’t have to be long. Sometimes they’ll be 15 minutes. Sometimes they will be 50 on Dhe then Also, one thing I love the Adobe did was quarterly check ins. So weekly one on ones could be really tactical and strategic and then quarterly check ins can be more like career development and bonuses or other kind of conversations going on. Uh, we use okay. Our tools here at cloud app are objective and result so that kind of helps us hold each other accountable and know where we are with our goals and every kind of log in and see the dashboard. Really understand where we’re at, where we’re missing and where we need to win a little better. So remote teams are really growing, as some cloud app of data we shared a couple weeks ago showed that around almost 60% of Gen Z US based office workers are working remotely the majority of the time each week over 50% of millennials are working remotely in the majority of the time. And that’s really because of you know, these big cities like San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, least in the U. S. Even cities like Austin Tech hubs like Austin and salt Lake City area that I’m in traffic. His has gone up quite a bit. Housing prices have been insane. And so people have to live further away from kind of that central office and also just the flexibility people enjoy Kind of being able to, um, have kind of comfort of home and being would be a little more flexible. Uh, so in the future, you know, we could see more people working remotely and seeing that as a benefit that they want versus kind of what we’ve seen over the last decade, which has been, Hey, let’s put up this really cool headquarters that has basically everything you need. So you don’t need to leave now. We may see a move to companies providing everything so that people don’t need to leave their own house. So look, keep an eye on remote work if you are remote working yourself. Hopefully, some of these tips were valuable to you. If you are managing a remote team definitely looked to meet regularly. When you can in person, hold those one on ones have virtual tools that can kind of connect you and really try and understand what your remote employees might be feeling. All these things will helpfully hopefully benefit and keep you and your company ahead of the curve. When it comes to remote work. And I look forward to continue to talk about this topic, let me know if you have any comments and definitely dropping some things. Your own tips or tricks that you’ve learned either managing or running or operating are being remote. Employee. Thanks have a great rest of the day. Thanks for joining the DNA of an Experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Turning your fanbase into a raving community

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DNA:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. I wanted to go through a couple of things that I’m excited about today. For Cloud App, we announced a community page that is a great way to kind of bring in all the three million plus users that we have a Cloud App into one community where we can share each other’s use cases, provide feedback on, really give our customers a voice where they can kind of showcase the work, that they’re doing at cloud app. And as I’m kind of releasing this community page this morning on our website on get cloud app dot com, here’s kind of ah view of it. I wanted to go through kind of the experience of that can create for a customer. So I learned a lot from this. Um, it was a couple years ago when Adobe acquired Magenta. Uh, I was kind of leading some research on that acquisition and kind of some of the on boarding team, and we uncovered just a massive community that Magenta had created, which was really cool. It’s just a really raving fan base. And a lot of it was from creating these kind of community pages, forums and other places where people could provide feedback, could be featured and kind of have their work shown. And so I wanted to kind of bring that to cloud app because I thought it would be a fun way to bring us all together in this kind of collaboration. 2.0, movement. Give our people a chance to kind of build their personal brand and how they’re kind of using things of their company, but also to help each other out. So, um, I know when I was kind of using cloud app at Adobe is kind of looking for different use cases, different ways that I could use it and kind of thinking through new ways to get things done. Um, and so that’s kind of what will we’ll see with this community page at cloud app. So as we were kind of developing it, I wanted to have three kind of different pillars to it. So the 1st 1 is use cases from you, the customer. So it’s looking at people that are actually using products day in, day out. At at no large companies, About 53% of the Fortune 500 use cloud app and bringing kind of their uses to the very home page. So when you look at it on, get cloud app dot com, you’ll see just kind of some beautiful tile setups. Um, I also kind of pulled from my friends over to Adobe Spark and how they run their community page, where it’s just really visual and ties in nicely to their product, which is a visual product. And then I wanted to showcase a bunch of use case pages we’ve created internally that show various things from you know, the free screen. 1/4 options to what you get from a pro plan to how to embed an image, an email or answer something through customer support. Tips for remote workers is how to use the Internet. So this is kind of a more high level piece where we use cloud app to show tutorials on how to use the Internet, various things from how to set up a Gmail account to Twitter account to how to update your notifications for the Catalina update with Mac always just kind of looking through things that people are searching for, um, on how to do certain things on the Internet. And we’re providing videos and pages on how to actually do those, obviously, all recorded with cloud app. So the hope is, um and actually that’s How To Use The Internet is also inspired by lots of people who get constant questions from family members or someone in your sphere asking you how to do things. You could just record a quick video yourself or find it on this. How to use the Internet page and send in the video of how to do certain things. Um, so there is a form that you can fill out if you’d like to feature something from cloud app that you’ve created and will kind of create a page, we’ll show your picture and provide you a link to your LinkedIn and Twitter Facebook profile whatever you want to kind of build up and bring more people into our community. So the goal here is really to provide kind of harness this movement, this large fan base that we have and bring them into, Um, you know what we’re trying to accomplish here at Cloud App. So I think that’s a big piece of a community. Page is you really want to have it being open back and forth communication so bilateral communication, Um, so that you can get that feedback. You can create that connection and really feel like, um, the people feel like they’re kind of leading the company. Uh, definitely. At a start up, you know, you wanna have customer feedback, lead product and really have focus on customers so that you can, um, keep providing value to them, keep growing that loyalty from them. And that’s what we’re really trying to do, you know, show our customers how much we love them and appreciate them. How much how passionate we are about kind of leading the modern workplace and remote work and connecting, you know, new asynchronous communication channels. Through a report we ran called the State of Collaboration, we found that, uh, close to 60% of millennials and Gen z generations are working from home or remotely most of the week. So, you know we want to connect with those groups and also, you know, everyone else. That’s kind of in the workforce now and provide them ways that they can communicate visually. So this community page is going to really harness, um, the power of learning from others and kind of making everyone that’s using our product of thought leader. And we’re excited about kind of the opportunity here. So kind of some of my initial learnings definitely researched a lot about cos I respect and how they’ve kind of run their community pages had some experience through Adobe and and prior to that kind of setting up community opportunities, finding ways that people can kind of showcase their products or their, uh, their projects and how they’re kind of using your product. Um, and really finding more connection points between the company and the community. You know, we really want to feel like we’ve got this huge fan base that we think we can draw from and help us grow. Um, and so we want to connect with those three million people as often as possible. Um, so check out the community page if you’re a fan of cloud app or if you’re kind of just wondering how to potentially grow your business or connect with your customer base A little bit more community could be a great way to enable people. Use your product in lots of different ways. Oh, the other thing I loved is there is This is kind of based around a stat that’s 68% of people prefer a short video to learn about a product. So, um, you know, that’s a piece of cloud app were kind of providing a lot of how to videos on how to use the product in lots of different ways. So the community pages up. Check out the use cases from you. It’s it’s initially filled out by people here. Internally, it cloud app there, all power users. But we’ll be doing outreach this week and over the next several months to kind of fill that out with power users. And then there’s use cases from us, which is Paige is provided from our company on use cases and then how to use the Internet. So check those three things out. Um, definitely fill out the form and submit your use case, and we’ll be in touch on how to kind of expand that out feature you and we’re looking forward to kind of growing our community and again saying thank you to our three million plus user base of cloud app. So thank you and have a great day. Thinks thanks for joining the DNA of an Eperienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create instantly share able videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.