CMO of G2 Ryan Bonnicci – working remote, growing a brand, leading with customer experience

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and Experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning, everyone. I am so excited to have ah, long time friend Ryan Bonnicci with me the CMO at dot com G2 a great company that I love and go to frequently. Definitely Friends of Cloud App. Well, and I’m excited have Ryan to kind of go through. Ah, lot of the stuff that G2 has been seeing all this. No remote work, craziness and businesses cutting back, um, and understanding where there spend is going. But I want to start off with asking Ryan what has kind of been the craziest, weirdest, most strange thing that’s you’ve kind of experienced over these last three weeks?

Ryan:

01:01

God, it’s good to be here in years, but, um, I don’t know what’s the craziest thing to be honest, and I think kind of it is a few things to me, like it’s weird, I think, for us old just going through such like a collective experience around the world, right? Like there’s, like, rarely a time where, like everyone that you know, regardless of where they live in the background there anything like is experiencing a similar thing. So that’s been kind of really we’re heading to may and unique. But then also, um, e I don’t know. It’s kind of like really brought me closer to friends around the world. And I feel like I’ve been reaching out more by face time and just on the different, like chat problems, to connect with friends, which normally, I don’t know, I had been to a good job prioritizing. So that’s been like I get a really nice thing. Maybe one of the weirdest things I saw or I’m seeing was the recording, and you’ll be seeing this. And it was, ah, what a workplace doing is, um, Cole. And then one of the colleagues on the Cole didn’t realize that video was out of my call. And it’s truly the most amazing from video Emma for like the time’s right out. But all the way he’s like one of her colleagues is 10 people of Nicole, obviously. Then I downloaded the video on YouTube in a really weird like, she must be pissed. Just one of the weird things, its seat out of this whole thing. What is that really important? Yeah, yeah. You know, I feel I’ve first week was super funky, and there was actually earn Earthquake in Utah. You know, if you saw that like, my wife was at the gym and I was like throwing kids under the table like pulling the toddler out of his high chair and like, all right. And I was like, day two of like being home. So it was like, OK, I don’t know if I can handle this. Yesterday I got jury duty in the man that and on top of everything, has this been kind of just such a surreal few weeks. But t your exact point like I feel like there is that collective connection which has been cool. Um, that the whole world is, you know, connected in this for good or bad. And I definitely have, like, connected. Like, I have this text ring with my my siblings and my parents that, you know, we’re talking almost every day And, like I’m texting old friends from from my childhood. And, um yeah, there’s been a cool, like focus on family and friends and kind of like taking a step back from what else was going on.

Joe:

04:05

Yeah, absolutely. So take me through kind of your your background. What brought you to G2, um you know, I You guys air are fantastic at a lot of different pieces of marketing that I love. Um, what’s kind of been your collective strategy that you tried to implement there?

Ryan:

04:31

Yeah. So, yeah, around 2.5 years ago? Uh, yeah, when I joined those new MX five. Also folks in the marketing team. And now where A 50 or 60 so pretty, like massive growth, Especially in that first year. But my background is pretty much predominantly baby marketing. So I was at Microsoft Salesforce Exact target on the, most recently home spot for G2. Um, and so, yeah. I mean, in terms of G2 when I joined to letter. Part of your question on the board gave me really 3 10 Of course, things are really driving back home, and that was driving by a traffic to us out. So you know where a marketplace obviously, so we have no wings of buyers coming to the site every week. So millions of businesses around the world sending employees to kind of look for the best software. So their companies. And that’s booming right now for us. Given that, you know, Corona is kind of you and I were talking about, but always until it’s just kind of accelerated. The digitization was so many businesses around the world that maybe wouldn’t have gone here for maybe another 10 years or more, who knows? And now they’ve been forced to kind of, like, get digitized or become disrupted, and so that was kind of the first big one. And when I think when I joined well, maybe seeing gosh, I want to say about like half a 1,000,000 organic visitors a month, and now we’re seeing all my six million visitors a month, his so six million businesses coming organically. It’s kind of wild. Yeah, that’s getting to the point now where it’s like almost two million a week. So, yeah, I think we’ve done a really great time building the bias side of business. The second kind of big thing that the board gave you was to really build out traditional be to be marketing command. Jeff filed for ourselves to get so doing everything from feel marketing events. You know big deal Support, um, product marketing benefits into that, Obviously. And everything is wrapped digital are mine converse employers and essentially describing marketing source of revenue to the business. That was something that really kind of was not super existent. I think before I joined, for better or worse, really, the team and just going with the organically and naturally, because we’re a marketplace that in itself drives a bit of cellar demand for us to weaken. Sellers like yourself are obviously always looking for where they’re buyers up. And if you’re seeing you know, your G2 the naturally you guys who most likely reach out. So we have a lot of organic growth in early on. You know, we’ve really built that up. That was sort of the second big thing that the board asked with me. And then the was really about building a brand that building a brand new businesses around the world. No love and trust and trust is obviously really important value for us and given. Well, almost all of our competitors very much pay to play in that, you know, event or pays for their position in the rankings based on just TPC and actually willing to bid on that place. And none of the how ratings and reviews are paid. They’re all they’re all driven by authentic customer voice, right?

Joe:

07:17

Yeah, that’s really cool. I think you know, you’ve you’ve done a good job with, you know, each of those I always tell, like my content team, you know, which is me in my other person, on my team, Um, like a man. You know, I’ve got a lot of content envy for G2. They always do some really cool stuff.

Ryan:

07:38

Thanks. Yeah. Works really hard, I think, to get that team really cranking. We’ve got some rocks. I was on that team, so yeah, it’s been evolution. Creating content is like one of those things that, um I mean, there’s obviously so many different forms of content. I think we’ve always bean really great product marketing content for the most part of a sincere product marketing team, because we I had really strong folks. Forget, though. And that’s something that product marketing content can immediately enable yourself. Seems with you immediately see impact content being one content in the purpose of driving traffic and buyers, which is, I guess, the way most people think of content and mostly will build back to use around kind of be a top of funnel content in terms of heads. Anyways, um, I I think we underestimated Ally certainly underestimated how long it would take to really feel that function. Not only the schools for the function, but just Google doesn’t really change their view of you every night. It really takes a lot of time for Google to start to trust your authority in a space. You know. Gosh, two years ago will be launched out blah, blah and g to dot com. It really took us a long time, no longer than I for I mean to cause trouble year from starting to when we were sitting around a 1,000,000 spires coming to that every month, which I guess is no no, a small number by any means. But I think we, you know, make coming from Hub Spot where I was saying eight million visitors to our website plug every month. I was like, Oh, we could easily get there. I think that was clearly, like, too naive to realize that. You know what? It took us 10 years to that point, you know, And also when we started on the spot, you know, content marketing, Was it really a thing? And so it was super uncompetitive. It was we’ve ever easy to rank. Yeah, I think the other piece of the puzzle I didn’t even contemplate was that, you know, for the hub spot Long, you know, we were. So we’re such experts in marketing related content that it was really clear to Google that who would We were kind of the authority on that, because all of the content, for the most part for the majority of years was all around that topic. Whereas with G2, we kind of approach it of like, let’s go wide and go across, like, how do we create content? All of these different software categories that were therefore, And, I don’t know if I don’t know if long term that ultimately the best play necessarily. And we’ve decided to kind of create more hubs around in Southern domain. I’m different specialties purely just because of the fact that you need to be really crystal clearly Google around. You know what your side is? Is an authority on. So, yeah, it’s been a fun journey.

Joe:

10:11

That’s really a point. What, You know, there’s you bring up a good point about this kind of a world is distraction. There’s lots of people jumping in on the content game. How How have you guys been able to stand out? Um, I think your brand is definitely piece of that. Like mentioned as your third thing to kind of build a G2 what are some other ways that you’ve been all that kind of stand out?

Ryan:

10:34

Um, I mean, I think I personally think the best way to stand out regardless, you know, your business is ultimately about, you know, a remarkable product or service, because I think you look at the end of the day like the core thing that you’re selling. If that’s not remarkable, if that’s not unique, is that doesn’t know, you know. It’s really strong value proposition in comparison to your competitors Then then it’s really difficult, and that’s not to say that you can’t stand out with really amazing marketing as well. But if your product isn’t great, right, like the marketing can only get in 70 people and I’ll try a product that they work for their friends. And if you would have us, you know, strong over kind of referral. Look, that may be a business with a really strong product. Also, this has, uh, telling for us. You know, the way we try and stand out is you know, there’s two parts where the first is we kind of ultimately a number one customer is the buyer that comes to outside even though the buyer doesn’t spend any money with us. So we don’t make a new revenue directly from the bar. But I think we know that if we can really give buyers what they want, that more of them will come to outside and more buyers to our saddle men we can sell. Our subscription service is to Sellers. Black companies like cloud app screen recorder or screenshot tool with Zoom or Microsoft. And so, um so yeah, but trying truly like differentiating they’re the product that’s helped us a lot. So I think you know what we what? We’ve noticed over the last maybe two years is that we see tap terror. You know, they’re one about because if not the biggest predator, you know, if you look at their electoral ranking over the last set of the year, and I was like, it took us a while. But we’ve now I’ve ever taken that kept terror. The 10th biggest send arriving for Google AdWords, which is crazy s o. You know, I can’t prove this, but I feel like they get organic list and help from Google just because they spend so much money that, um but it’s taken us a long time to beat them. And I think ultimately we haven’t. We’ve obviously made improvements on its CEO and content. No doubt they have a swell. And I think ultimately, what hope is that Google can see that when someone comes to our side versus cap terrorists that they spend, you know, significantly longer on their side, they view significantly more pages on outside their time inside. It’s so much higher. Um and so every time I think buyers of learn that actually, they what? We hear this, like also kind of from buyers that come to outside. They’ll say that, you know, I bought a piece of software, see around more email marketing from Cap Terrors recommendations, and then the product was horrible. Then they realized only after the fact that they bought something that actually wasn’t the top rated stuff where they bought something that was just paying to be a couple one spot. So people get burned, I think, really usually in. And they remember, like, who gave him that recommendation. So over time meeting, that’s really hurt their reputation. Um, so I’d say That’s probably I think by really like dialing, you know, now product and really dialing in on What is it? The buyers, one that’s helped us a lot. We’ve also, I think, you know, a little asked me, has launched a lot of a lot more products with lies as well. So you know, it’s part of kind of everything going on with Corona. We we launched a 90 day free trial of tea to track, which is a platform that allows you to analyze all of yourself West Bend Hubble, which uses air using software which uses aren’t using software and then it gives your CFO, is what we’re see levels like a live your business functions really clear inside. It’s okay. Winner all about excess contracts with doing Which ones should we renew? Which one should we can? So which one don’t we have? High estimate. Sorry. Hi, employees Usage often ends like let’s dial back the number. It’s this low cost. There were Americans guzzle it out for you. And so I think that was like, another thing that we were able to, you know, really lean into over the last year to help buy has not only find the best software for their business, but then, once they bought that software, optimize their spend. So right now, right, Like I used to get an example like I get an email once a month with G to track, and it says here I am like yours. Older software that your team is currently spending home here is like your Newell’s. These contracts have order. Renewal is in place. So, like if you don’t want them, you better like told them in advance. Otherwise you’re gonna pay without realizing, given just everything going on right, like there’s been a few Software that we have kind of pause now so that we don’t have to spend on people money on just to be really conservative, given everything going on. Um, yes, I guess if anyone’s listening to this, if you go to G, if you could attract a G tube out calm, you know you can use that product for free. And again, we’re not trying to like sell folks on that, like it’s completely free product to get them through. Sort of everything I’ve done right now to help, hopefully optimize costs. And then the trial will just turn off at the end of the 90 days, and hopefully they’ve extracted the value from it. But I don’t know if you’re doing things like that. There’s another way that we’re trying to create really strong experiences that are relevant in time. People given the times. So

Joe:

15:32

yeah, I really like that. You know, there’s there’s been a definitely a movement of sass, kind of. And you, you know, you guys could fit into that as well. Um, kind of helping or like seeing how their product could try and help and benefit. You know, certainly at cloud app like we’ve seen enormous growth with the push for remote work And so, no, our thing was was all about like, first of all, like all the last year of like, putting out that content and like creating some authority has brought a lot of traffic into the site. Um, so that’s kind of cool to see, but also, um, we pushed, like some product updates that we weren’t planning to do until late April. Um, you know, we cranked him out because we knew would make the product faster and more reliable and really tracker, like one more game, knowing that people were gonna rely even more on it. So it’s been kind of cool to see lots of companies jumping in on that.

Ryan:

16:34

Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, it’s really fascinating. This so many. I mean, we’re seeing I think I’m agency before we thought it going live. But we’re seeing record numbers is that software buys on outside of the moment because they’re just that they really struggling to look at what’s up where they need, which is. They know that like they can’t do their business in the way that they were doing it face to face now. So categories like remote work, remote learning, remote service’s videoconferencing etcetera just blooming right out and makes a lot of sense. And people are really accelerating the biogenic, right? So they’re spending instead of spending months and months. They’re like spending hours and days deciding what they’re going to box would ever be really helpful waiting for us in our own renewal with her own customers. Because, you know, they can see such a surge of buyers on definitely what Order some things you know, on the flipping on its head a little bit with like, business is evaluating, spend looking at tools.

Joe:

17:24

Now, what are some things that G2 is doing now or has kind of always tried to do with your 1 to 1 customer relationships to ensure that, you know, people are happy having a good experience? Um, you know, the track is product is a great example of that. I think, um, that’s really cool. Um, knowing that that’s what people are doing. What are some other things you guys have tried to do to really try to create a good customer experience?

Ryan:

18:05

Yeah. I mean, I think for us, you know, we’ve always been really survive, like, kind of like a funnel, right? so, like awareness consideration decision, you know, before enjoying G2 was always really, you know, an expert and decision making content and consideration content. So, you know, we we scored really highly whenever would ask for, you know, you know where they found value and outside. Naturally, they said, like they found a lot of value for helping them Might consider different products as well as, um, you know, actually choose which one to buy. Where we never scored super well on was helping them work out what products they needed in the first place and then helping the work different strategies and ways to actually use those products. That was a bit, I guess, is the genesis of what drove us to build our dog eat dog home was because, you know, we kind of view that really is sort of like a hub for strategic content. So, you know, let’s say like, you’re a social media marketing manager at a company, you know, you might go to Google, and you might say it’s like how to optimize my Facebook for business page or how to write their Twitter twitter tweets that they cover it up. Uh, a little bit like those searches are indicative of the Okay, maybe you don’t have the right social media software that you need to put better job at creating social place. So optimizing your account. Um, you know, some of my search had a live stream on linked in live like we’re going on, and so we never really had content to kind of help them out in those kinds of sales inquiries. So, you know, we really leaned heavily into creating that content, and that way we can help them with their initial problem, give them a solution, and then also educate them on. Hey, just so you know, there’s social media software that you could use toe do all of this more automatic and better learn about the best rate and software providers. And so, you know, I think that was a little bit That’s kind of, I guess, a bit more of like an out of final way to attract people, right in the same way that I’m sure cloud up. You obviously no doubt have lots of content around. You know how to record meetings. How do you know? You know, Efficiencies between colleagues remotely and things that are very quarter your product. And but then I’m sure you guys also have content that’s like broader than just about. You know what your product does. But it is indicated that the person has a problem that could be solved by your product. So I think we kind of score it really well about that. And you know those things. Hope build, trust and hope, Bill kind of brand affinity before someone even pies thing. And also, you know, they might not buy something at the company that they’re at. But if they want so much of your content over the months or years, when they go to another company where they actually need something that your product, your company, maybe cells, they’ll come back into the content and then you’d be more like Medical Way. See that in the sad that a group of companies that I broke down in the past so I think we’ve really heavily about that. How do we How do we help people before they know they need software? And then I guess you had to kind of what we’re talking about with to track. We thought a lot more about, You know, we’re helping them at a decision point in time, but, you know, we were then starting to look a racer. Should we saw that. You know, it was like, billions of dollars. Like I remember. I want to say hundreds of billions of dollars of software is wasted every year by people that by contract for their employees. Then over the course of you know, a year there needs change and then uses Stop using So and so you know, we were getting questions from people about, you know. Hey, I bought this software has been really useful. We’re coming up to, like, renewal. What should I do on now is really where we then went into the G to track product and and created that for them to help them, actually, you know, think about Celeste and optimization, because for a little company is right, you know? So they’re scaling up from, you know, 52 maybe 205 100 plus cousins. They’re most likely spending millions a year on multi millions. Right? Especially when you’re getting 2000 plus person company is that you’re spending 10 Bill, maybe more on software stack from you know the development side with reporter to the marketing side, a chart, all those different teams so really kind of quickly becomes a really expensive cost. So let’s think we’ve tried to think a little bit more about you, just like the full life cycle in Journey for a contributor to learn G2 I can say there’s definitely some good rigor there to get way. Definitely only one high quality content that Children who runs the program run runs a tight ship.

Joe:

22:43

Definitely love it, Ryan. With the last minute or two we’ve got I think we could chat all day. Um, but what is kind of what do you see? Is the future of customer experience? No, maybe from learnings. From what we’re going through right now, what do you see is kind of things. That business is conducive and business will be Start doing based on, you know, customer experience needs.

Ryan:

23:07

Yeah, yeah, I mean, I think that ultimately, like, cause when I kind of answer that question, I think to myself, You know what? Oh, companies that I personally have amazing customer experiences with, you know, and everything going like the beat of the side, you know, to products that come to mind. One of you know, they’re both kind of like free me and products that scale up from paid or low cost. One of them is what it’s called. But I you every hour, every day superhuman to manage my email on . Then I use I use started using this new software tool called Sun Sama recently which kind of hopes you kind of pull in all your asana tasks and then allocate them two hours of the day. So you’re a sign of how long the toss taken in aquitted to take a really amazing job asking you every morning, you know? What do you want to focus on today? These are the task you didn’t finish yesterday. So it kind of really focuses you on what you need to get done right now, which I sometimes find is like a limitation of tools. Like a son. I went You could just see all the tusks. Your I like what I need to do right now. They credit such an amazing experience, their own boarding in the same way that superhuman didn’t I think you know the fact that I didn’t have to speak to a sales person to buy those tools. And they had an amazing on boarding experience. I’d say, like as touchless Leah’s, you can create chrysalis process, a maturing process, the better on. And I think this is something to be to be is getting better at. But, uh, obviously has a way of being really strong about this. You know, there’s like a few different products that I buy online, and, you know, one of them is really recently it’s It’s like being in plant based organic food delivery that, like males that coming pre proud, that’s called spring Lee. I’m opening all over the US We’re just in Chicago, but, uh, and they’re amazing in terms of you just chat with their stuff, and you can really easily change the number of males that you are on. Wait, you can’t just say like him. We were living in a different house right now, while everything’s going on. They change your interest super seamlessly like I never need to like Morgan to a bath man. Everything on and it just makes me want to kind of refer that business. Others, because it’s such an amazing experience. You know, they’re they’re really available for me, Uh, wherever I like River. That’s Facebook Messenger on their home page of pretext, like really accessible. So I don’t know. I think when I think about some experience to try and think about, how do you induces many like friction points as possible to help the person on. But I also kind of think about how do you create experience where they don’t feel locked in? And I think this is something that, like beady based software, still struggles with, right? Like a lot of the time. It’s about, you know, one year or three year multi year contracts, which can want to be your companies that are established and evolving as quickly as normal. But for smaller companies that every year they look different in terms of the DNA and their goals, multi contracts don’t really work well. And then they wasted little money, so I don’t know. I think the beat of the space has a ways to go in terms of like creating really great custom.

Joe:

26:14

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense that I think I think the tie, you know, a lot of learnings from B2 see is really for sure. You know, we always look at ways to have sales, assisted type things, but maybe self service kind of the growth factor.

Ryan:

26:28

Yeah. I mean, I think just if you think about all of our own experiences, like when I bought my car like, bought it on mine and then texted to organize a delivery date, and then it just appeared in my house like you really mean? Like that was just I bought the car while I was on a plane coming back from like San Francisco, and she can’t go out there like it’s me drinks, right? Knight Final act like surprised? Yeah. I had a couple of lines at this point in time, and that was when I bought my first pal, Atanas. Well, with literally also on a plane up Rick of one’s. My point is these companies have made it so touchless to buy that like, someone in that kind of state come by, right? And maybe I wouldn’t have bought, you know, the car for a few moments for a few more years that, you know, it was so easy that I was able to do it on a plane after Wyatt. So you know, this is this is not many beat of the sets companies in the world that make that east you two black. Unless there’s something you know, like a $50 product. And it’s totally online. But, uh, yeah, so I kind of just thinking about how do you reduce friction as much as possible? A customer experience is definitely, you know, it’s a huge like value proposition. Easy.

Joe:

27:44

Love it Ryan. Great. Talking with you today. Hunker down. Hang in there. We’ll get through this and Thanks, man. Yeah. Thanks for joining the DNA Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your Customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

Talking remote work and the modern workplace with Firstbase founder Chris Herd

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Joe:

00:00

welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from cloud app where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Hello, everyone. I am excited to have Chris here with me from first base H Q. Chris is leading a really cool, uh, company kind of centered around remote work and kind of the modern workplace. And so I’m excited to have him on. We connected a couple weeks ago on Twitter. Had a nice conversation. Um, and, you know, struck up some similarities pretty quickly. So excited to have him. He is in New York today usually is. Is out in the UK so glad that he’s able to be honest, similar times on me today. Um, but, Chris, why don’t you take a minute and kind of introduce yourself kind of your path to founding first base and then kind of a little bit about the business?

Chris:

01:06

Yeah. So we were building a intact business previously and focused on solving an asymmetric information problem. You know what you pay for your bills and expenses? I know what I gave her my bills and expenses. Neither of us ever knew those if we’re getting the best deal possible. So we put them in your bank account, analyze your recurring expenses and told you when you were paying more than you should be, and then could automatically switch you to a better deal on the when to get you that obviously. And way started that in March 2008. We’re doing relatively well talking to some of the big British banks, some of the credit ratings agencies in the U. S. R. B to be there in that product and then all of a Bentley. By July stroke August last year, we realized our customer acquisition costs were too high on we were looking to pivot to something else. We had three months of runway laugh, the usual star up story on bridges, looking for what we wanted to do with arrest that time because we knew we couldn’t finish the defense, that product, to the extent that we wanted to fortunately or are in retrospect, we’ve created this infernal product on which turned out to be first base, and we were a fully remote team. We wanted to be removed because I never want to commute. For 25 days a year, my CTO wanted to be around When the sun laughed for the first time, I walked for the first time. So we always knew that we wanted to do that on. We’re told seed investors about raising a fairly large seed round. They knew we were gonna hire 15 or 20 remote workers. And because we had a terrible experience getting our six year old self. When he joined, we find out it was incredibly expensive up front. It was time consuming. And then this stuff never turned up. We basically just don’t want product to take care of that. We finished that in February 2008 and 19 and then completely forgot about me for six months, never looked at it and never touched it. Never spoke down on about it on Dhe. Then fast forward to the point where we were thinking about everything. I literally mentioned this to one of my friends by mistake, and he was like, This is the coolest thing I’ve ever seen. You do that. We’re like, Well, no, not really in the adoration existed today, and obviously from that point we went spoke to other people. They said the same thing we spoke The big enterprises Fortune 561 hundred’s based at the same thing as well. So we pivot truly first base in August 2019 and yeah, being Bildman business ever since I love it.

Joe:

03:34

Yeah, it’s such a cool story. How Ah, no. So many like little stories built into the narrative and in kind of your lead up to where you’re at now, where you found ah need to pivot and found this you thought had an idea of what this business would be. And then it was like this little piece of it ended up being, you know, first base and kind of where the real growth was and really cool story with with kind of no launching a new company and having so many distractions with content and new SAS tools and definitely remote work is on the rise. And so there’s a lot of remote work options. How have you guys tried to kind of stand out and create on experience for your customers and also just have your brand kind of shine?

Chris:

04:25

Yeah, I think probably two ways it’s specifically with content way. Appreciate LA content on lengthen in terms of the bloke post that rewriting, which evangelize the benefits of remote, were highlight other companies. They’re offering great remote working experiences, and that’s really just leads a lot off on inbound more than anything else. So I think just being part of the community, shading the experiences that we’ve had, the tools that we’re using, the best practices that were operating too. So I guess the one that stands out with is really a sink first over, synchronous first and actually lurk sharing our thoughts, um around that has just help people gravitate towards what we’re doing. And in the same time, I think, yes, there’s been a lot of focus on what we would call the sacks a side of remote working. And there’s a lot of fragmentation there. There’s communication tools, collaboration, tools, documentation, tools and having been a remote T. We just experienced several challenges and obstacles ourselves around that culture and physical experience place at home. Yeah, that was really the reason that we we started to think about first base in those granular terms. How can we How can we make sure that workers are safer, more comfortable, more productive home than they would be in an office when we create the office type experience in the home so people can do there on the best work that they’ve ever done.

Joe:

05:45

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. You mentioned, you know, community and kind of how you been able to try and connect with customers and kind of get things rolling. What do you see is kind of like the d n a of a good experience and maybe even, like, take us through. Uh, you know, you mentioned some companies that have kind of already signed up to work with first base. What is that kind of, like acquisition to on boarding to, uh, you know, they’ve signed up to kind of customer success like, What does that look like for you guys?

Chris:

06:22

Yes, So we’re probably still anecdotal evidence of customer success, but obviously can share just to that point. So many. We’ve got 600 companies on our waiting list that’s growing about 5 to 10 every day, and that’s just all pure inbound from things that we’ve read. So in that initial instance, they obviously joined the way unless we reach out to them directly, you get from a little bit more information about what we’re doing. Anything trying before struggles they have with remote work right now and really understand how we could be helpful with were remote for the right reasons. Receive the benefits that people will get in terms of quality of life on. That’s really what we try to help them with and help them achieve. E that RV Reince of that. So once the initial fits made, I guess they begin to move them. The funnel, They’re qualified. Customer. Um, we would jump on a similar type of cold like this or an in person meet and where again we would dialed deeper into those problems. Understand? If if they’re struggling a go remote because it’s got high up from cost. Is it because they’re worried about I guess, sir, and trust issues, or do they trust their teams to be removed? And then once we understand that we try to identify which parts of first base would be beneficial for them. So cool, those conversations obviously continued. I’m not often where we can say Okay, Well, what first base is is this all in one provisioning tool. The lets you provide a great remote working experience at the touch of a button, and you don’t have to order that stuff. You don’t have to take her up front. It’s not gonna arrive piecemeal with 15 different boxes is gonna come all at the same time. And not only that, we’re going to deliver that we’re gonna maintain not we’re going to repair that. And at the end of the working relationship of a worker leaves, we’re going to collect as well. I think every company that’s ever had a remote workers and whose face that challenge understands the benefits where they want. Then I think it’s harder to appreciate it until you’ve actually lived through it.

Joe:

08:23

Yeah, yeah, I mean, that’s that’s fair. There’s there’s definitely some pain points there with you gave me kind of Ah, quick demo when we have a chat. Ah, couple weeks ago. And you know the portal looks really intriguing and and kind of how the flow works and and really easy to set up. How have you tried to use like visuals and video to kind of really make that experience pop and kind of bring people in. Maybe it’s a piece of your content strategy. Or how have you tried to show that?

Chris:

08:55

Yeah, I think for any product that’s consumer facing an insult fires, people are gonna use it as a service. Um, it needs to be attractive. And if whether you want cold up, it’s actually the superhuman effect everyone expects even be to be tight products their enterprise. So B to B to C. So we work with the enterprise. We don’t get to their customer. Who’s there? Worker? The end People just have a higher expectation around the call. A not just the visuals but the quality of the product. So, yeah, we spent a lot of time on making sure the U X is a sin. It was possible making fairly if we share images of the product is attractive is it needs to be. And I think in terms of the landing page showing how easy the product is to use, giving the key benefits. That’s been something that’s been incredibly powerful for us, and I guess that’s what’s led us to create that waiting list and in such a short period of time,

Joe:

09:50

Yeah, really cool Congrats on that. Um, I Let’s maybe pivot a teeny bit and and dig in on some of the remote stuff you’ve you’ve mentioned. Um, what is what have you found? Is kind of like the key for you working, working remotely. First of all, Ah, as an individual, how How have you been able to kind of, um, feel that connection that you have? If you’re working next to someone and then secondarily, how have you been a leader of a remote first company? What are some tips and tricks you found that have been helpful with that?

Chris:

10:30

I think for the first part, the question it’s it’s really the human connection still necessary, right? So we obviously don’t work in person every day, but we will be up in frequently, and I think there’s a different cadence for different organizations. I think it’s hard for me to say that it’s a specific duration or Peter the time between those meetings. But for us, it’s probably every quarter or a minimum on dhe. Then it’s about the human interactions that you have during those periods virtually. Um, I know some people are reluctant to video on, but I actually think it’s a massive help in terms of cultivating Gal’s connections. I think it’s important to have things like Slack Jonah. Let’s where people can be themselves and share a little bit there outside life with, well, they’re working on. And then I think the third parties. And this probably leads into the next question. In terms of managing removed teams, it’s just being comfortable with the switch. The East synchronous working so way, understand that the main benefit of being removed is that’s your lawn, an instantaneous gratification office where everybody’s gonna come up to you talking on the shoulder and distract you from what you’re doing. Like the officers became this distraction factory on the kid’s clothes. We’ve been really conscious of not replicating, all the bad parts of working in an office in a remote saying so because people are working from home, they bought their private space. How can we ensure that they’ve got the isolation and focus to do the work without disruption? And I think there’s there’s a couple of things that help with that. I think the first ones great planning. I think you’ve got to be key and managing your calendar and invisibility of that calendar. So people know what you’re doing when you’re available. On to the second part is probably just being capable of doing work in isolation on your own, so that more of a personal thing around people who become remote workers, anything right now remote worker, self select for that. And they’re typically more organized their typically better and managing their time. And I think that’s a key thing that makes it certainly easier for me is a remote as a manager of removed team to manage the team. A lot of it’s on the team that we’ve rebuilt or doing incredible work and just empowering them to do that remotely.

Joe:

12:48

Yeah, I think he brought up some great points of, you know, that regular cadence of meeting up, um, allowing people to do deep work providing the outlets for informal communication on slack. Uh, you know, I I I started using cloud app so much at adobe because I was managing some people that were in a pack, and it was hard for us to meet based on time zones frequently. And so I use the cloud app screen recorder and screenshot tool to do that in a synchronous communication like you mentioned like you still got the visual on the video face time of me recording myself, you know, talking to a deck or whatever. Um, but didn’t necessarily have to have those like meeting times. And I think that’s kind of the That’s the modern workforce that I see is is this remote, uh, global distributed teams and people just trying to find ways to to make it more convenient and not have to be on a call it at eight or 9 p.m. you know, when they’ve already kind of shut down for the night and they’re trying to relax and don’t necessarily want to get on a call with someone in Japan or Australia, are India or whatever.

Chris:

14:07

Yeah, and I think it’s something that normal remote teams don’t fully appreciate. So to give you an example of what I guess removed by, everyone knows about office work being true, right? If you’ve got an office, you can hire the best person that you can afford within a 30 mile radius of not physical location. Now understand that are you have the capacity to work remotely and be asynchronous in the matter that you say where you’re working with people in a bar or another place in the world where the titans one’s different and you need to understand and appreciate those differences and half the tools that enable you to do that. And the benefit, obviously, is that you’re not in that position where you’re hiring in a 30 mile radius. You’re not disqualifying yourself from 99.9% of the talent gold way you start to be able to hire the best person on the planet that that can do that, Joe. You just need to need to be willing to trust them on understand that they’re going to be working at a different time from you. So you need to be more managed in your processes of doing.

Joe:

15:09

Yeah, that’s really, really great points. Um, going back to kind of customer experience. Um what what is? You know, we talked a lot about first base. We talked a lot about remote work. What is a recent experience you’ve had as a consumer? Uh, you know, that could be with retailer travel. Be to be like, what is an experience where you kind of walked away recently and we’re like, Wow, that was really great. I want to do more business with them,

Chris:

15:40

Right? Um, so So I was a really big skeptic of airports. Sure. Yeah, like it’s this wireless earphone have. And then my dad got there. I connected those my phone for the first time, and I didn’t even have to connect them. You just hold it close to the fold, and that’s it done. And then you flip open. You take them out, you put them in your ears and you’re immediately connected like walk. That seamless experience the apple has on that not permeates their whole drowned right The second you like you one books, and it’s like a suction effect, because the packaging is a product of himself. Yeah, and then it goes on the physical products with our the hardware where you open the laptop. And it’s just it’s a great experience from the moment you purchase in the store through to the UN packaging of it through to the new so bad. And then if something goes wrong as well, they’re just great and viewing without whether that’s going in store. Whether that’s jumping on a coal. Yep, on that’s that’s something that sticks with me all the time. Apple kill it every time when there’s there’s never been an Apple product. I’ve been even the packaging by being like underwhelmed by acting. So if you buy the apple watch, the packaging is beautiful. Like, yeah, is it turn an advert for Apple here, But nobody in the world who does it better than that.

Joe:

17:04

Yeah, I’m with you. I I think I’ve said that in the past two. I have really hone in on, like the packaging of Apple in the branding in. Uh, yeah, well, it’s It’s hard when we all kind of live in an apple Amazon world where it’s like speed and quality and efficiency and things. They’re all kind of expected of every business. Um, so, yeah, we just we just do our best and carry on. What do you think is is the future of you know, I usually asked, What’s the future experience business, But let’s let’s flip this a little bit since you have, uh, you know, some expertise in a different area. What’s what’s the future of the modern workplace look like? You know, we’ve talked a lot about remote. What do you think? The modern workplace is based on trends week are currently seeing. And where do you see it kind of going?

Chris:

17:56

Yeah, So it’s so I think somewhat. Um, surprisingly, the future trend of the workplace is about going back to back to the future. Basically going back to what office originally. Was. So if you look at what the office was originally designed is the optimum place to do deport that we touched on this before in our previous gold to where, after the industrial revolution and because the cost of real estate was super low, every white collar worker had their own private office, and they still had those areas that they could talk to each other and they would go for lunch, etc. But the key part was they have that isolation to do deep focused work. And then you see the linear progression off the the office. Architecturally, going from the place of revolver are private space. And then it was we’ve all got these cubicles. So you had these Semi private spaces to open working spaces Now, which are just ridiculous in terms of being able to do deep work, just you could never focus. And so for me. That’s what remote work becomes, actually would return back to what was initially that best place. We still have the opportunity to me often person have those open spaces. Do the collaborative work. I think people will say that we have watches. The collaboration when you go remain may. Personally, I’ve never seen any detrimental effect. I think it’s completely over blue, and you start to think of the benefits of remote work. And for me, that’s that’s where the future of work’s going. That’s where the future of the work place is going. It’s about how can people and it is probably a good place to finish on. How come people organize work around their life rather than organizing life are under work and really less well, what gift them? Remote working gives people less about more control over their life. More flexibility, any more violence, more trust from their workers. But ultimately, to fix there were scheduled to do their best more, and that’s really what the future of work, probably the future of everything’s and really about.

Joe:

20:01

I love that I love that take, you know, it is kind of made me think of that, like Twitter rant that. I’m sure you saw, like, a few weeks ago about people talking about how many hours they’re working well, And how house basically turning to do how silly that is, like, No, no one cares. Um, like, are you getting your stuff done? Like, does it take you 40 or 50 hours ago? Your stuff done, or is it taking you 80 hours to get your stuff? Don’t like the point. Is the work done? Be productive. And the real value is like you said, trying to find, uh, you know, we’re all trying to find a balance. And you, especially as a founder of a new company, you know, searching for a balance of enough work, but also, like, I don’t want to burn out. And I want to make sure that I’m not, you know, wasting my prime years just working. Um, so I think that was really good. Take any other closing thoughts, Chris.

Chris:

21:03

Um, not not specific way. I think that’s I think that’s an interesting one, because it’s just something that people appreciate its. Yeah, right now, people are living in high cost of living places and exacting a relatively little cost of life and a little bullet of life. And I think that there’s something egotistical about that where people just see themselves and align themselves with the number on the ball away. And actually, they don’t appreciate that. The thing that’s going to give them the higher goal in life is the disposable income that’s left at the end of the month. So, to your point, not being handcuffed to a city and be able to go away for a two week period on an insurance while continuing to work because you can operate a synchronously able to drop your kids at school being able to for me person, I get to read, work out, eat breakfast with my family and last time that my previous morning commute. So, yeah, for me, that’s that’s what remote work is. That’s why we want remote work to grow. We see this is really being the thing that will deliver the highest quality of life gains across the next decade them. That’s why we see it as having growing as quickly as us, and I think the more that we can do to help people have that great experience the battery. But work’s gonna be in the more people are gonna work remotely

Joe:

22:19

awesome, Chris, Great conversation. Thanks for your time and safe travels when you leave the UK or leave New York back to UK. Appreciate it. Thanks, man. Thanks. Thanks for joining the DNA Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer.Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Talking content and CX with Nico Prins, consultant for Fortune 500 companies

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from cloud app where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Hey, everyone, I am so excited to have ah Nico as a guest this morning with me or this afternoon. Actually, Nico has been, um him and I have been talking for the last few weeks a lot about content and customer experience. And so I I off asked him to come join me and talk through some of the things he’s done with consulting with a lot of Fortune 500 companies and helping them kind of create their path with content. Leading to customer experience and also just kind of some of the things that he might see, you know, forthcoming with the modern workplace and how we can kind of as companies do a better job at reaching our customers. So, Nico, I’ll give you a minute to introduce yourself, and then we’ll kind of go through some questions and kind of see where the discussion goes.

Nico:

01:09

Perfect Yeah, thank you very much for having me. You gave a pretty good overview of my background. So I spend more or less half my week working for S E R. Agency based in the UK on we’re doing a little work we’d kind of like Hence boys level and larger Alexis Cos predominantly on down on the side of the eye or city personal consulting as well. It’s more or less, sir. A quick snapshot of May. A lot of the work’s coming, like, focused on on the customer experience and how to house optimized and improve the customer experience and create constantly kind of like aligns with the interests of the customers. Likely tell.

Joe:

01:56

Very cool. You know, we live in a world full of distraction. There’s so much content out there, so much availability. And people are getting hit with notifications from Slack and Linked in and Twitter and Facebook and, uh, email. What’s away? That ah brand can kind of cut through that noise.

Nico:

02:15

So I think locate him. An important element of that really is to It’s kind of like define what is your your favorite channel, right? Because for most companies on does there are so many channels are those a CZ you kind of like brightly mentions. But for most companies ever kind of like this idea when the head of on the channel communication of coming, like being out to be on every single channel and provide the best experience across every single channel? But the reality is, I think, for most companies is that they they don’t have that kind of like. The resource is, I guess, for the majority of companies to provide that amazing experience. Of course, all channel says coming like to focus instead on on what are your what, your favorite channels and then provide the best experience for your customers across that. Because that’s really so. Tomorrow is the engagement is really what you’re gonna, you know, improve the customer experience as well.

Joe:

03:13

It’s kind of like dig in a little bit deeper on that. What, you know, with so many Channel opportunities, what people really want? What’s the DNA of, ah, good customer experience

Nico:

03:26

I think the DNA of a good customer experience. It’s kind of like first, you really need to define what you’re kind of like brand promises, right? Right. What do you want to deliver. And what What can you realistically delivered your customers and on wants be laying for and have that kind of like clearly, you know, clearly outlined for yourself and for the for the company as a whole on Deacon. Then build on that kind of like that core messaging that hope you hopefully over Stephen can deliver on. And then it’s a case of really provoked, like educating hands, illustrating the body that you can provide the your customers. I’m going across there across the different channels and kind of like greatness smooth on boarding and then engagement.

Joe:

04:16

Yeah, I like how you started with you know, cos strategy. It’s it’s that can be driven. Definitely buy a customer feedback and other things that kind of creates. What you want to be is a brand, But you also need to no, start with that. Who do we want to be now? Who do you want to be five years from now? How is our messaging going to reflect that? And how can we kind of use that to motivate our customers to stay loyal or or start in the first place and inspire, you know, initial customers will his retention?

Nico:

04:50

Yeah. Yeah, and I definitely couldn’t agree more.

Joe:

04:54

How can you? You know, we’re kind of content has expanded into lots of different aspects of things. How? How could you think videos and visuals and trying to connect outside of text? And can really help connect you with your customer.

Nico:

05:12

I think videos incredibly important, especially its part, the boarding process. A lot more important than text just because of the amount of data that you can even provide right. Like if we were having this, this conversation is as an email sequence. Then that would be, you know, we’d be ordered on the 50th email backwards and forwards. Um, and so it’s that the ability to convey information quickly on officially is is a huge advantage of video, obviously, but it’s also had put also that engagement as well. Because you’re creating a personal engagement, is you is you interact by by video, which is something that you you you didn’t get to a degree with text, but you don’t get us quickly unless disability toe, you know, so basically represent your your ground three video is in your You’re connecting with an individual often, um is very, very powerful, which is kind of like and when you consider and just a marketing really like one of the most effective sales channels. Is his Web, our webinars? And it’s kind of understandable because through a weapon, or you haven’t on our face time with someone in, You know, that’s ideally what you want. So what you tried to do offline if you’re trying to sell oh, educated is it’s together face time that want to one face time with a person on that that creates opportunities to educate, inform and provide body.

Joe:

06:42

Yes, it’s interesting how we’ve kind of moved into this like videoconferencing is kind of the standard now, Uh, no tools like cloudapp screen recorder and screenshot tool provides, like the asynchronous communication. Like you said, like yesterday I was. Instead of typing out a massively long email, I was recording my screen and recording me talking to my screen of how I wanted a designer to do a certain thing on the landing page. And, yeah, it was all about time. But also about that connection point. And those types of things could be really valuable not just for your external brand and connecting with customers, but also like internal brand And how you’re working with other people on your team.

Nico:

07:27

Yeah, Yeah, I completely I mean, I work so I work is part of it. Distributes workforce. I guess I’m the Ashley. The any person that’s this distributed in our company. Uh, say that ability toe, you know, it’s a connect. Well, videos is really important. It’s part of just the day to day processes of working because it maintains up that engagement with with the person which, when he you know, if you there’s a miscommunication or something like that, which can happen quite easily, just kind of being up to just jump on a on a cool and just deal with something very quickly can help a was over problem that will say becoming like, you know, yeah. So the problem faster, I guess, is also

Joe:

08:10

Yeah, we did this. Ah, we did this survey of, like, 1000 U. S. Office workers last year, and we found that no more than 50% of people said they would communicate more have done visually, but also people still prefer that, like, in person communication. Um, so it’s interesting that, you know, we’re all still human. We still need that, like face to face communication. Now we need that connection and feel like we’re, you know, on the side of something together. So it’s interesting how you talk about kind of video and visuals helping to benefit that.

Nico:

08:47

Yeah, very important

Joe:

08:50

when you’re consulting. You have a little bit different kind of agency consulting background the night than I normally kind of talk with. So your customer is kind of, you know, distributed. It’s it’s lots of different cos they’re all kind of no agency life asking Everything needs to be done like yesterday, and everything needs to have lots of results. And I’m sure there’s lots of complaints and more so than gratitude. So um, how do you kind of go about creating experience for your customers in that sense? And what have you been able to find is a repeatable way to to do that?

Nico:

09:31

So, I mean, some of the some of the fundamentals are very similar process, in my opinion, because part of it is the is the on boarding process. So it’s kind of like how do you create a really smooth on boarding process? And for agencies that well, the fundamentals of very similar it tends to be more than or flying process. It’s kind of like how g Yeah. How’d you get from the sales meeting? Howdy. Do create the engagement through sales meeting and enjoyed achieved the outcome that you’re looking for, which is tell us the land. Uh, but then you know the components of that kind of like going your expenses showing why you’re the best personal, you know in the sassy equipment would be the best tool for the job. What the features are that you are for eternal life and trying to provide that that experience, which is, which is your expertise, which was becoming like something similar to demo or senator. That’s it’s kind of that whole prices well, different is it’s very similar. Um, and so it’s really yes, really clear. Focus on the customer on understanding what that pain points are likely to be on understanding what you’re what you’re brand promises on damp to convey that officially supposed to your best investigate that you come essentially.

Joe:

10:53

It’s really good. I like how you kind of tied it back to, you know, brand strategy and really just being, uh, focused on what you want to deliver and kind of really no doubling down on that with creating that experience.

Nico:

11:09

Yeah, yeah, yeah. And then then then I guess the ongoing part, which is similar wrist, this is the kind of retention about is obviously with us. You’ve got touring, you’re trying to keep them in the tour, and hopefully they just do that without any kind of problems. But then you have there. That’s alongside which you kind of like you. You know your weapon. Also, your email sequences where you’re sending us out where you’re trying to kind of, like, maintain the engagement. And for us, it would be the the regular meetings right there. The ability to do this video chats toe. No, I need to touch base to discuss the project, but also to kind of, like, maintain a friendship alongside. And there’s kind of like, yeah, it’s important, regardless of what needs you operating. And nothing that that’s very important.

Joe:

11:59

Yeah, yeah, I agree. You know, you’re you’re also a customer on your own. On so own side. You’re buying tools. You’re buying clothes online. You’re buying lots of stuff is a consumer. What’s a recent experience you’ve had as a customer yourself? That has kind of made you more loyal, made you more connected to a brand.

Nico:

12:24

Say so you gave me the questions before. I’m obviously before this. I know it’s been quite a quite a long think about it and say, And I was struggling to come up with, like, one very stand out, kind of like fact, especially for a brand by recently. So this is not something is going to keep me retained toe the company. I recently visited Petra and say, I like I’ve got most people that the visit Petra was just kind of like a place in Jordan. Yeah, what do you say for like, say, three days and we gets to a restaurant on the first night and say, Nice service, nice food or the rest of that kind of stuff cuts the end, got to the bill and the guy was like, No, no, no, no, no. You’re not allowed to leave now. Let me give you dessert in a cup of tea and say, Certainly Kaposi’s criminal so very, very friendly and engaging kind of like that that desire to provide extra value on Dhe, then to try and pull us in for the next day. And he was kind of like, Oh, and by the way, if you come back the next day, we’ll give you 10% off and he’s got this very kind of, like, smooth sail sequence that doesn’t foretell contrived, which I think is very important for customer loyalty, because obviously people there let me cynical. But they kind of like, appreciate about you, right? I’m saying this very smooth sail sequence that kind of like drew us back for the next day, right? Um and that was that was kind of like a standout thing. I thought when I was was considering a question

Joe:

13:59

that’s cool. That’s that’s the unique experience. Um, and it it kind of points to like, even if you’ve gotta have it along the whole sequence, like if the food was terrible, you even if the service was amazing and they gave you a discount, you wouldn’t have gone back, you know? So it’s got like, the product has to be good, but then you’ve also got to provide that, you know, extra experience, and then like that reason to come back.

Nico:

14:27

Yeah, yeah, exactly. Exactly. And it’s very like simple cell sequence that he has, but I think it’s I can see that being a very effective cell sequence mitts. It’s kind of like what you do. I really look for from a company, right? Is that kind of ability toe. Now show your value. Shea show the extra value that you can bring because most companies operate in a very competitive marketplace and then howto helped pull people back in. Well, you never taken them essentially.

Joe:

14:55

So what do you think? You know, This has been a great conversation. We’ve gone down a lot of paths with strategy and other things. What do you think the future looks like? What What’s your You know, if you look a TTE Nico Prince Crystal Ball, what is the future of experience business look like in the next 5 10 years?

Nico:

15:14

So, I mean, I think most t this two on board one’s right one would be five Jean the what fight you brings to enough. That’s just gonna transcend across most finishes in, you know, if a man’s voice down toe Cosima something that would be a big change in in kind of a deal. Experience processes you playing together with states from different ports. Such points, Um, for the for me, that’s more of an incremental thing because most of that souls are already out. That is just how you’re combining with that information and providing a better experience, like almost like the all new tunnel. Boxing, I guess.

Joe:

15:58

Very cool.

Nico:

16:00

And then the second thing, which I think is it’s going to be the bigger change point is really the virtual reality because we’re starting, you know, it’s like, almost like the eighties with the huge frames quite now. But 10 years from now, it’s gonna be, you know, it’s gonna be a big change in that thing. That’s gonna be one of the bigger It gets. Weapons, I guess.

Joe:

16:20

Yes, that’s a good point. I I you know, I worked at Adobe before Cloud app, and so I was kind of part of this customer experience business, narrative development from adobes perspective. Then I remember one of the coolest things I saw from V R. Was I think they known outdoor retailer they were presenting at Adobe Summit. The conference and they showed, um, you know, like a virtual shopping experience and you could like you could actually like with the gloves and gauntlets they had on you could actually pick up the items like spin him around. Look out, Um, put him in your like virtual cart. Yeah, like, Yeah, it’s because that’s kind of what’s been missing from online buying is kind of the touch and fuel and the satisfaction of that. So it’s interesting that you brought that up?

Nico:

17:22

Yeah, yeah, No, I think it’s giving a nice illustration of where that could, potentially where virtual reality could potentially take you. And I think that’s it. It’s just we’re at such a the beginning points where it’s not really people aren’t really used to it and say once it gets to that stage like the options are gonna be, say, say very, I guess

Joe:

17:45

Very cool. Well, Nico, thank you so much for your time today. Lots of great insights from your opportunities, you know, consulting with a lot of Fortune 500 companies. Uh, lots of good stuff on customer experience, and we’ll have to do this again soon.

Nico:

18:00

Yeah, and I thank you very much for your time. Appreciate.

Joe:

18:06

Thanks for joining the D. N A. Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create. For your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Talking with former lead at Yelp and Dribbble Nicole Warshauer on growth, content, and Disneyland

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from Cloud Up where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. All right. Good morning, everyone. I am excited to have Nicole with me today. Nicole and I have been connected for so long on mostly Twitter. It’s expanded over the last six months year. So um, worked on a few things when she was at dribble. And Nicole has a lot of wealth of knowledge from her time at dribble and yelp and lots of other really well recognized companies in her work with marketing. And so I’m excited to have her on today to really talk about experience and kind of the future of the modern workplace content marketing wherever we kind of go down. Um, but I wanted to give her a chance to introduce herself and kind of go through her background and, um, what she’s, you know, most passion about other things. And then, uh, you know, I was at Disney with my family last week and she’s going for vacation next week, so we will. We’ll go in on some Disney stuff. Well,

Nicole:

01:18

yeah. Pray, pray for us. Thank you. I appreciate the kind intro. Yes, I am Nicole. War shower and my backgrounds Pretty varied. And I like to say that I play at the fun intersection of marketing, communications and community. Um, as Joe mentioned, I’ve built in lead remote teams at the likes of dribble and quite a long time at Yelp. And I think my kind of strategic point is that I really pride myself in jumping into the community and connecting with the customer right away is fast as I can. Um, and I have two Children as his Joe mentioned with the Disney note and also a gem. And I I can’t handle caffeine, and I love brownies. So nice cover the full gamut alone. I’m going. Yeah, that’s it. I’m impressed. So way got a drilling on the caffeine being I can’t handle managing my job and my kids without a little bit of caffeine. Yeah, No, go there. There’s a lot of people for the story, but years and years ago I gave up caffeine. I like for fun, which was I don’t know why I was probably smart at the time. And ever since then, if I have any caffeine anytime, like after maybe like 11 a.m. I will be up till about 4 a.m. And, um So it’s great if I have, like, a teeny bit, because then I feel like an absolute superhero, notably deficient, like put me next to, like, a campaign or something Thio, you know, pull together and I’m a mastermind. So if I use it very sparingly, it’s really effective. But if my decaf get swapped with a caffeinated coffee like I am shaking like mess, you don’t want that e love it alone.

Joe:

03:08

So you know, we live in a world full of distraction. You’ve led lots of different content teams and kind of trying to help brands break through the noise. Uh, what it were some kind of tips and tricks on how you feel about that.

Nicole:

03:24

I think the 1st 1 I’d like to always share with whether it’s a team or even on a consulting project, is like tell me about your customer. Do you know your customer? And you know what are you trying to solve? What pain point can you alleviate for them? So you know everything’s a distraction, right, whether it’s social or whether it’s your family, your Children, you know a project that you’re working on. So if you can distill it down to knowing your customer knowing their problem and solve it, that’s really sticky. That’ll give you that longevity to create an experience that matters for me. The brands that stand out, how that clear, consistent message and how they’re gonna fix those problems for their core. You know, consumer and I think it’s really important also to know that you know, all customers are users. But not all users are customers, right? It’s someone who you know, you know their issues, you know how to solve them, and you want to make that. It’s seamless as possible. So just because it’s not a crazy experience doesn’t mean it’s not a valuable one for your customer.

Joe:

04:32

I love I love the road that this question takes us down and feel like it’s different with with different people. And I like that you went down kind of the customer customer feedback loop almost and how important it is to really be connected and really understand. Uh, how you did be enabling your customer to use your know if you’re using a product, how they better in that type thing? So what is kind of the core or DNA of a good customer experience there? And if you’re really trying to focus on that loop and making sure you’re listening and providing a good experience, what is kind at the root of that,

Nicole:

05:12

The route to me of like a really good experience is kind of framing it out from start to finish. I think there’s a lot of brands that do this well, but also a lot that don’t, um, where you know, you have an amazing product. Do you have a really cool brand you like? Here you go, customer. Here is everything for you. What? You don’t lead them down That experience. You don’t show them how to use your product or your service. No examples. You don’t give great testimonials. And I’m not just saying that, you know, said Brand. Don’t have those pieces somewhere on their site. But that whole loop, that whole cycle has to be seamless. It has to be clear. And so that’s where I spent a lot of time playing with content to make sure that the customer, the consumer, the user, your target, if you will feels really welcomed, feels like they’re part of a community and that they know how to best. You know, use those pieces of your product or service that they feel that they’re being heard. You can anticipate their needs and what they’re looking to do or to solve that problem that they have.

Joe:

06:15

Yeah, I think that makes sense. You you can have this, you know, like beautiful, top of funnel or awareness stage of the journey that you’re really driving business, too. But then, if they land on your site and if they don’t know you are, If you’re a smaller brand and you don’t quickly show them or bring them to value, it’s it’s basically just a bounce. Hey, what’s that right?

Nicole:

06:36

So sickly at another piece, I think is really valuable. To least consider is the after process. So the after they purchased it, or they’ve gotten to know that connected or given you their email. That’s currency right after they’ve done that. Then what? Um, sending them just a female of like, Hey, thanks for cropping. Thanks for that’s not enough. Um, I’m not saying you two go bombard them with 96,000 emails each. But think about that customer in terms of they just spent time or money or knowledge on your site. How can you give them over of that? How can you level them up? So if they went with your initial plan? Great, Cool. You get X amount for a month or week or whatever it is. But how can you bring them through that funnel of making them an ecstatic consumer? Not just someone who’s like, Oh, I got this thing from this place one time and it was fine. You want them to be part of that community? If you’ve got content pieces, can you deliver those to them? Um, if there’s a referral network and you deliver that and so making it a process where they feel involved on that their feedback is valid and value is hypercritical in my eyes.

Joe:

07:47

Yeah, that’s a really good point. And it really kind of helps you enable your community. You know, that’s one thing that I think both dribble and yeah, yelp have done. You know, excellent job doing is creating this community of no yelps currency is free reviews. How are they, like, how did they get, you know, this massive community and then dribble, you know, is on the design side. And how did they kind of build that mass community? Well, I think it’s, you know, they put a focus on things you’re talking about.

Nicole:

08:20

Yeah, even to the to the content piece to that element as well as you know, when I was at dribble kind of figuring out the content side of it of who we want to highlight in the stories we want to tell, Um, you know, I don’t want to hit people over the head with a product like, That’s not what it’s there for. It’s there, too. Lift them up in ST, you know, true to the mission and making sure that we are supporting designers in every way in shape we can whether it’s leveling up their skill, um, or showcasing their talents or just out offering inspiration. And you can take that to yelp as well as you said, like reviews air free and everyone uses them. I use them all the time and that community aspect of I know Joan, he look, he knows sushi, you know, in Park City, and so, like, I’m gonna rely on him. But also, it’s the great way to experience local business. And so that feedback loop, even if you’re not reviewing, is so huge to to a local business to kind of take their their brand recognition and their connection to the community to that next level.

Joe:

09:21

Definitely, if we look at it, kind of like how content has evolved. You know, one of my favorite things is is looking at, like, go back on your Facebook feed if you still have Facebook. And my my first post was maybe, like, 2006 or 2007 like I’ve recently been married and it was basically, like high school reunion, almost like it was reconnecting with friends I hadn’t seen in five or 10 years and like it was very conversational is like Joe to X person. A great to see you, You know, that type of thing. And now you look at it and it’s visuals and video, and obviously Facebook is doubled down on visuals with instagram and brands, you know are putting all visuals and video. How do you think those can kind of, uh, helping experience on and really kind of tie you to your brand with with where we’re at with content.

Nicole:

10:19

I think it’s don’t say it’s the only way to go, but it’s the only smart way to go in terms of visuals. You can pull stats from, you know, here to wherever but like video and visuals are, you know it gets the best engagement for any type of social post, for sure. But like beyond, like cliques and recognition and all that stuff, it’s just intelligent and smart to do it for your consumer and for your brand, as we were talking about earlier. Showing someone how to use something is amazing and like that should be integral in everything you do, whether it’s a campaign or whether it’s a product or service. Um, I, you know, they’re not hanging out with your customers are hang out. Deb team like picking out. But like so, what may seem intuitive to a product team or to an engineering team, or even to Occam’s team is not necessarily intuitive, too. You know, Jane down the street, who wants to buy a new look loss, so I think it’s taking a step back and saying, What type of visuals do I need to lead that customer down that path? And it’s not just you and us, but it’s also after you’ve done all the work. If you’re not seeing that conversion, what’s missing here? And maybe it is adding more visuals to lead them down. That passed.

Joe:

11:37

They feel that they’re connected, that you’re really considering their experience now, one of the biggest like use cases we’ve seen a cloud app is people using the cloudapp screen recorder to record how to videos and, uh, recently, like I had John Knightley for Simo Blue Jeans on, um, a couple weeks ago, and he talked about how they used cloud up to kind of record videos. And then that was a part of, like their product launch. Yeah, used that collateral, and it was like, Hey, here’s this cool new feature and here’s also how to use it on Dhe. That’s kind of you know, it goes back to What we first talked about is unquestioned kind of the second question, which is, You know, you’re instantly enabling people to use that new feature and see the benefit versus like just what is going on The PR aspect.

Nicole:

12:25

You hope for the best way. We did a lot of that at Yelp. I think, you know, on the mobile side, the album is so powerful, there’s so much that you can access, you know, with your fingertips. But it also can get really crowded because you can access so much. And so there would be a lot of kind of sharing on the community side, you know? Oh, there’s this new feature, like, New for you. How do I find that? Where is it? Um, And so instead of doing like a big blog post But all the things that you could do, like sometimes it just takes a little bit of a nudge like, Hey, did you know that this there’s this new cool thing? Here’s how you access that. Here’s how using Here’s how I found the amazing Thai Place down the street or for dribble we did. Quite a bit of that. in terms of, you know, sharing fresh new features because guess what? Like most people have lives like that. They’re not like waiting for you to release the next feature. Cool. Yeah. Cool like it’s, you know, and the next. And so it has to be really, really compelling a really life changing for them to dig in and spend five minutes trying to figure out that feature on. Most people will just leave if it’s taking them that long. So if you’re finding that you’re getting that block or that obstacle on the way of someone you know, exploring something or using a new feature, new service or product or whatever it is, um, you know you can kind of have a stop gap with some visuals and explain that you know, don’t just tell them. Show them you can do through social or if you’re content. Um, and I think 11 other element that’s interesting to explore is how people use your product, how it wasn’t intended and that could be shared through visuals as well. So I’m not saying to hack something that way, but kind of, um and that’s a really cool way to explore those new avenues and then share back with your team or your engineering team. You’re Deb, Tina, say, like actually it was made this way, but the community found this other way to use it and like, look at what they’re doing. Like That’s incredible. That’s it. That’s a new potential revenue stream for you.

Joe:

14:30

Yeah, that’s a really good point. Um, and I think, Yes, it’s kind of Ah, you nailed it with, Like, visual. How they’re kind of part of every piece of the journey, like even even blogged posts. Now you know what kind of best practices to have, uh, you know, image every I don’t know, paragraph repair, effort to get somebody with a number. That is because it’s just it’s, like, massive, Wouldn’t you know? It’s It’s a really delicate balance, right? You don’t wanna go too far in one direction, but people like to look at things. So it’s It’s especially when it’s not just a gorgeous stock photo, which listen, I love gorgeous dot com, But if it’s an explanatory piece that looks great and it’s designed with, like some good intently, that’s that’s pretty powerful. So what is? I always like to ask, what is a recent experience, you know, outside of work, probably not Amazon, because everybody loves Amazon. Um, but what’s the recent experience you’ve had with retail travel? Yeah, anything that you can kind of think of top of mind that a company provided for you.

Nicole:

15:40

It’s kind of kind of a little bit work related, but not really. Um, so I use 1/3 party email platform called Mix Max. Okay, It’s great for, like, template sizing things, sharing with teams. It does email tracking for opens and things like that. It’s a little feels a little voyeuristic, but I would never, you know, go that far. But it’s really helpful to set reminders and remind me to follow up with things on Biff. I’m doing a lot of freelance projects. It’s really helpful for me to stay on top of all of those pieces. And I was experiencing this really odd duplication the other day where anything I was sending it was doubling the content of my e mails like Precisely which made me look nutty. Um, yeah, it happened a couple times, and I sent a note to their their customer success. Tina, I was like, Hey, like something funky is going on. I was tracking my settings. Everything looked normal. I’ve used their product for a couple of years now, as I said, it really like it and they got back to me within a couple hours and said like Hey, like, you know, send us a screenshot, we wanna be able to investigate it for you and take a look. They solve my problem, Joe, within, like, an hour after that second email, Okay? Sent us this code, you know, refresh. Let’s take a look. And it was fixed. Could have been a fluke, but regardless, I had, like, maybe six or seven test emails. That was it was still there a ring before they push that fixed. So whatever they did or whatever they didn’t do made it made it work. But I guess the critical piece of this is that when they sent me that, like, do these three things visual, visual, visual visual, like, go here. Don’t just give me a long stream of, like, 16 things to find. Like, show me where, um, and they did an actual screen video to which was, like, I didn’t have to. It was super nice.

Joe:

17:26

Yeah, I was that. I was, uh, so I was on a call with Web flow the other day and same type of thing, and they’re actually a customer of cloud app. So it’s kind of fun to like, see them using screenshots anger and screen recordings to close the ticket. Um, but yeah, I think to your point, like I wrote this in a post for Qualtrics a few weeks ago, that I have this experience with Patagonia, and, um, I had to return the shirt because I washed it the first time like you’re supposed to and it kind of like bled a little bit, but I have a decent experience along the whole path. But it was that customer support were like my wife was like, Oh, you know, I wonder if they’ll give you, like, friction to like return the shirt because you washed it might take the tag off and everything. And I was literally on the call for, like, 90 seconds. And they’re like, OK, the new shirts on the way. Um, there’s a UPS label put in the old shirt in Send it back, and it was just like you’re like, Wow, this. I mean, if you need for support like your loyal loyalty is just through the roof.

Nicole:

18:36

Yeah, I think customer support is like the unsung hero of all tech like all Cos to be honest, like a great customer support team with a really good excuse me messed messaging and ticketing system is magical. That was something that was really important on the durable side when I started, because it was it wasn’t framed out in a way that we could respond to the community. Now you’re not gonna respond to everybody. But on the social side, there wasn’t something that was in place to make sure that we were listening and having that feedback loop. So, um, that was like hyper critical to get that locked in right away. And, um, I said, even with, like, retail, if there’s a couple other companies like Chewy, for example, is unbelievable customer support like above and beyond that stuff. And then we talk about people aren’t loyal very much anymore to brands or companies. But man, like they get it right, they knocked it out of the park.

Joe:

19:30

So with your kind of closing the loop on things, I want to actually shift a teeny bit because we didn’t go heavy in under remote work. But I think you have a lot of knowledge in that space. So tipping this conversation towards more remote with the last kind of question. What do you think is like the future of the modern workplace? You know, if we look, at cloud app has done a bunch of unique research and shown that, like, 57% of Gen z and millennials are working remotely the majority of the time. Uh, San Francisco’s really expensive, so people are living in different areas and, um, expanding your hiring pool, right? Where do you kind of see the future workplace heading?

Nicole:

20:14

I think the stats stats don’t lie. Um, And for me, I think there’s gonna be more remote. I think there’s gonna be more flexibility to work remote. And that could only happen if the tools like zoom like slack and everything else kind of keep up with the times. And there’s so many other tools that we kind of need or have or need to be combined, if you will, with remote at least my experience, like I can find all the tools I need. But it’s like a menu of things I have to keep open and use, which is nice, but it would be even better if there were kind of bucket id or pull together. I think remote only going to rise because people want to enjoy, enjoy their lives and commuting, frankly, is just like soul crushing. I did it for a while. I don’t wanna do it again. So I don’t think you’re gonna find too many people who who want to have that type of commune. And so if you want to find the talents and you do are especially here in a city that has, you know, those heavy commute times or this really expensive rents, what kind of commercial property costs it’s It’s just a smart way to go. Um, and I’ve found the best talent remotely, and I’m a huge proponent. I will sing its praises forever. I will say to I think in terms of changes for remote, we’re gonna have to get better remote managers and better amount leadership. I think that’s a skill that is really valuable. It’s also let’s really hard because you’re used to seeing your team helping them along their way. You know, being that kind of person, the office to walk by and can’t have that quick chat. You can certainly do that remotely, and I personally love it that way, but it requires even more person to person management. It requires you getting on a video call instead of just defaulting to the phone. It requires it having those conversations about their career trajectory more often because you’re not physically seeing them. Um, it’s kind of like that long distance relationship like it’s worth it if you if you put the work in. So I think, and the management leadership side, I think we need to see a lot more growth. There are a lot more tools and training some before we couldn’t really say like any company can be remote because it probably can’t. But the ones that are big enough, I think the leadership side has to catch up a little bit.

Joe:

22:38

I really like that point. Um, yeah, man. Managing a remote team is definitely challenging. Um, but I I think it is. It is possible, like you said, and can be very rewarding.

Vanessa:

22:50

Yeah, definitely. Can be.

Joe:

22:52

Well, I, uh I have that soul crushing traffic and Disneyland way flew into Burbank, which is no one ever flying to Burbank. Everyone for l. A X is the best. Never flying a Burbank or Long Beach. Those were those were the hidden gems there, but, um, we flew in at 5 p.m. So we have that, like, two hours of traffic to get to Disney. Definitely. Soul crushing from the high of, like landing in California.

bit.

Nicole:

23:21

Yeah, you’re all excited, like, you know we’re here. Not you’re not there at all. Yeah,

Joe:

23:27

No experience that. Think we don’t have it too much here in Utah, but I definitely experienced there. Well, the coal your legends. I hope you have something. And, uh, let’s definitely do this again soon.

Nicole:

23:43

I would love to. Joe, thanks so much for having me.

Joe:

23:46

Okay. Thanks for joining the DNA Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0, movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

Talking CX with media guru and VP at iHeartMedia Vanessa Wojtusiak

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA of an Experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us Live today with Vanessa from my heart media. Vanessa is leading some really cool stuff over there, and we’ve been connected on Twitter for quite some time and Linkedin and reached out a few weeks ago and just said, Hey, I think you have a pretty cool background story That’d be fun to talk about and kind of talk about traditional media and how it’s evolved and how it relates to customer experience. So Vanessa was able to get some time, and we found some time first of the year to talk about these things, and I’m excited to have her. I’ll pass some time, have her to give a little bit of a background, and then we’ll go through some questions about customer experience in kind of a modern workplace.

Vanessa:

01:01

Yeah, thanks for having me on Joe. This is a really cool concept. I love what you do, and I love being able to share some of my knowledge in the space specifically in media and a traditional media company and really trying to evolve in the space. So just a little bit about myself. I live for media, the content that consumption and my life has really been focused around that radio business at the age of 15 working in marketing across some stations in Connecticut and Boston, the New York City. Um, from there I decided to check out the world of record labels venturing into Capital Records, Virgin Records, which wasn’t too far away from radio business on. That’s always been kind of my core in passion. Um, after that, I got sucked back into radio for the first time, this time in a position to help build the I heart radio app, which I’m sure you heard of little baby app like that. It was amazing. And still to this day, it’s one of my really proud moments just to see that brand explode, Um, to take the technology from a traditional media company and actually put it in the palm of your hands and see that brand everywhere is really awesome. Iconic? Um, Spence Radio music was really all I knew. I then decided to take a step into TV, So I decided to work at the local ABC affiliate here in Connecticut as the director of audience development, Um, TV is also a type of media that needs so of all that needs to keep up with, you know, your APS, your websites, your integrations and being able to talk to different people on different platforms and deliver them a product of news. So I was there for almost five years. Ah, in that capacity, leading a digital team, really evolving the brand in the space and how people are consuming news products. And back in November, I got sucked in for the second time. I can see why her radio as vice president of marketing hearing so well received eight radio stations locally over here. So that means digital. That means sales and sponsorship partnerships. That means innovative things in the programming space. And, you know, it’s just my passion. Every day is a new project, and I really love it.

Joe:

03:18

That’s a really cool background. Uh, its gets really interesting to see, like she said, the evolution of media and certainly I heart media and I heart radio app is everywhere and kind of ah, pillar of what we call a radio in the digital age in kind of a world full of distraction, full of content. And, uh, you can go and find anything. You can get anything on your phone, uh, at the touch of a button. How do you kind of in your current role in in the past, how have you tried to find a way to break through that and connect with your audience, connect with locally and globally or nationally with different pieces, things, things you work on?

Vanessa:

04:05

Yeah. So, as you were saying, distractions are everywhere because people have access to so many things just in the problem of palm of their hands. Um, you know, they’re walking around. They have this device that they’re constantly carrying attention spans are also dramatically lower. Because of that, you’re getting inundated with information left and right. Whether that is the competitors. Er, I personally don’t believe that the radio station across the street is a competitor anymore. That is Netflix. That’s Facebook. That’s different alerts on your phone. That’s conversations with friends at so many things that are important you, ether it is in your business or the outside of things. Um, Luckily, in this day and age, people do multitask. No. So it’s a matter of cutting through all that clutter. I know I’m guilty of watching a Netflix movie documentary or show and also doing something on my phone doing something on my computer at the same time. So it’s really about really cutting through that and finding a message that resonates with your audience. Let me stand out first with consumer facing, um, campaigns, uh, different targeting abilities as well. So you know your audience. I think a lot of that is psychologically driven. Have you no hear who you’re talking to, your able to then cater that message to them? Not everyone should be blasted with the same message. That’s also something that I try to get across in traditional media spaces where it’s broadcaster, Um, it’s not broadcasting anymore. It’s taking the little segments of your listeners of your viewers of whoever’s interacting with you and then serving up a better experience for them. That’s our custom tailored. What’s going on? So that’s how you could cut through distractions. You only have a couple of minutes when people are scrolling through their devices. Mindless, aided. Grab their attention in there. I’m if that’s what you’re trying to share, right way kind of a question.

Joe:

05:52

I’ve asked the gods. Well, what is the DNA of a good customer experience? I think it you know that on the head with, like, making it more micro, making it more personalized. Uh, especially if someone’s logged in. Um, we can use that great data that I’m sure, um, I heart uses and deal to give them a personalized experience.

Vanessa:

06:16

Yeah, exactly. I mean, that’s the benefit for me of working . We have all this data from different touch points were able to message people on social media, our website, the APP through onsite events. I think that’s also really key. Um, that a lot of people are missing shorts, the digital age. Sure, people are communicating constantly 24 7 on their phones and their computers and messaging app. It’s more more than ever to be actually out in the communities. People have that one on one conversation. I know it might seem old fashioned, but I think that really helps build the brands and build your relationships, and nowadays people will know that. Hey, you’re not a robot. I am actually talking to you like I’ve been following you on Twitter for so long, Joe. But it’s great to actually see you face to face and having application. I think bringing that concept back is something that is really needed. And that’s something that actually does cut through the clutter. Because once you have a wild one face conversation with someone, it’s harder to separate that and be distracted.

Joe:

07:20

yeah, that’s actually a great point. I mean, in business, uh, you know, at a big company in Adobe, I always if I needed, like, something from an engineer, like some data or I was working with another team. I always tried to either fly out San Jose if that’s where they were, or try and meet them in Utah or whether I needed to go and establish that personal connection. And I really think you know, when I think of I heart media as a kind of global brand, I think they’ve done a great job at kind of having that brand level, but also the radio stations that are owned by them. I also have their own little brand snitch, and I think you brought it up really well with with events. I think that’s a big piece of it. For Media is finding ways to connect both at the global brand level and the radio station level. Um, and I know, like locally, I see no, I heart media brands everywhere, right? Doing doing events, just driving by in my neighborhood or down to Salt Lake or wherever it seems like they’re always kind of, uh, you know, out out amongst the community and trying to connect with people. I think that’s really interesting way that create an experience.

Vanessa:

08:42

Yeah, exactly. I mean it is it’s kind of going back to the old fashioned, but it really is something that I am passionate about is working with your local communities being face to face. In addition to the abilities started, people with data on a nap on social media on, you know, everywhere you turn, so having that component is also something a little bit different for media again, as you were saying, there was kind of like the umbrella brand for our local radio stations, and then each personality is their own brand of greater brand. So being able to work and have a consistent message between whoever’s on air and whoever whatever your station represents is also key. So having that consistent messaging is also a great tip to also remember, So you have people that are in your organization, but they are your team players. It’s like a sports team. Um, could be Red Sox. And then you have all the different players and those players represent your brand and going together. You have to have a cohesive strategy and be on the same page or any of your marketing tactics.

Joe:

09:48

That’s really a point. Let’s dig in on that a teeny bit with I hadn’t actually thought about radio personalities re absolutely right. They have their own brand as well. You kind of this unique opportunity as as, ah, you know, the global brand to really have your Your employees are also your influencers. Um, so how how do you kind of Maybe you’re a piece of this. Maybe you’re not. But how do you try and utilize? You know, the talent that is doing the radio locally and nationally, um, to really spread the word of kind of the global brand.

Vanessa:

10:29

So, you know, they’re really passionate about the brand to they wouldn’t be here if they weren’t really all into radio and being able to connect the listeners. And you know, just that, the ease of being able to connect to them now like you don’t need a big boom box anymore. You have your phone and you can listen to that and interact with livers on air. Um, we have different topics throughout the day that people could call in. Radio is really like social media when it come when it really boils down to it. You know, you have a topic and people are encouraged to comment. To like to share, um, on Lee in a more personal way with radio, so use it utilizing all other personalities. They’re all different. They all connect different faces of our listener base in the audience. Um, we worked with advertisers and sponsors, too, sponsors that tie their messaging into the personality, whatever. Whatever brand reflects with them most rewarding. It lends nonprofits people that are really passionate about a specific thing, whether that’s pets, whether that’s, ah, female empowerment, whether that’s heart association or anything like that, being able to line those all up and having a face or a campaign, a project or anything like that. But utilizing our local talent, I think, is really super key and delivering that message. Those people build an established relationships with people Every single day. You’re in your car, you’re listening to a personality, and you’re like, Wow, you’re kind of maybe talking to yourself a little bit, um, shining into their conversation So they’re in your own there in your cars. They’re kind of like a friend if you don’t have someone around. So it’s really key for us. To runt, that relationship out to our sponsors and clients and things like that really trustworthy source. You’re building them up. Is influencers or particular campaign awesome? So the other thing you need challenge to kind of get the talent to buy into the messaging and also, you know, have them have input, but also make sure that it kind of connects to your audience to think that’s that’s really interesting

Joe:

12:32

Exactly. I mean, you can’t force something down their throats, either. It has to have a benefit for them. It has to have a listener benefit. We can’t just kind of blast or whatever is out there because that’s not effective marketing. That’s not effective branding at all. So having someone that’s authentic and really buying into whatever is happening is is key for all of our personalities, which in turn, are influencers cool. What? What do you say? What would you say? So, like, we’ve talked a lot about radio. Obviously, that’s, you know, auditory. It’s it’s on the go, it’s in your car. It’s It’s why you’re jogging at the or at the gym. Um, how do you kind of incorporate video and visuals to kind of connect with that person that is, maybe at work and stumbles upon a video or something that was created by you guys? How is that kind of worked? As a piece of your strategy?

Vanessa:

13:27

The visuals are increasingly important. I mean colors. You need sound, you need interaction. Um, audio with audio is the ability to do more with it because you’re not really focused just listening. So have a little conversation and pointing to a YouTube video that went viral. You’re you have to have a hook you have to influence them to really want to see the content that’s there on your website on your app Utilize. I’m messaging across all the different touch points because if you’re just talking to someone and they’re driving their car, they a should not be looking at their phones. Should not be picking anything up, but it should stick. And they’re hiding enough that when they’re done driving Hey, let me check out this video. Let me see what this personality posted on their Web site. Let me enter this contest and making it as straightforward as possible videos. Also, we do encourage Facebook lives. Instagram lives, um, just photos that way, people that are following them could interact as well and see what’s going on and the ability to, you know, share, um, and chime in on a different topic. So utilizing all the different touch points in addition to audio is really, really awesome.

Joe:

14:40

This has been a really great conversation. I think you’ve gone into it. A ton of things of what your company is doing to create an experience for customers want to kind of ask you more personally what is a recent experience you’ve had with brand another brand separate brand you know is you as a consumer, that’s I need you more boil or more connected to just some other brand other.

Vanessa:

15:07

Yes, so I personally love to be able to access brands on social media, especially for customer service. Actually had an issue the other day with one of our digital platforms that we use here. I’m at I heart. I was trying to contact their support seeming past business hours. I was like, Oh, now let me shoot them a tweet Let me send them a DM. Maybe they’ll get back to me. Maybe they won’t. You know, I feel like Twitter is probably the easiest way to contact someone, even if it’s beyond ours. In a matter of minutes. The CEO PM’s me and he said, Hey, I could help you out. Let me check this out right away. And from then on, I’m like, Wow, they check everything there on top of their game. They totally know howto win our business and really help us out with anything. So that was kind of like a major win. Even this past week. That was a problem that I had to go solve and social media was kind of to the rescue. Um, I actually do that. Maybe not as often, because I don’t like to use it as a sounding board for issues. But, you know, if I have too much ice in my coffee, I’ll post about it. And then all of a sudden I’ll get a click AM and they’re like, How could we solve your problems? So for me, that goes such a long way, and I totally understand the other side of things. Um, utilizing your own Twitter account work, Facebook or instagram to really help out your customer. And once they see that interaction, they’re like, Wow, this brand is actually a person, and they actually want to help me. And sometimes your perception could really turn around just based on that one interaction. If someone’s so so mad and you respond within a couple of minutes, you turn everything around and they’re willing to talk to their friends, their family and Alan. This story, too. And that goes a long way.

Joe:

16:50

Yeah. I think feel valuable to engage, you know, when it’s not just, like, blatant, disrespectful or what? Whatever, but like some of the best customer feedback conversations we’ve had at cloud up have been We’ve had someone that was really upset on Twitter or Facebook or whatever. And we reached out to them in many cases, like our CEO. Similar. Clear. Your experience has, like, a 10 minute zoom call with, uh, whoever was complaining. And they’re they’re, like, blown away, you know? Oh, my gosh. You know, I I wasn’t actually as mad as it sounded on Twitter and like, they become, like, really apologetic. Um, and a lot of times like, they’ll even either send out a really positive message or they’ll take down like the mention to our company. Um, and I had the same thing at Adobe. You know, it’s amazing, like a brand like photo shop or whatever. How many complaints a day we got, um, and, you know, trying to engage with each of those and really trying to keep that customer feed, look, feedback loop, fresh eyes, really key to customer experience business.

Vanessa:

18:08

Yeah, I totally agree. It is that relationship that you’re building on social media that you’re building everywhere else. People want accessibility these days again, going back to the attention span. They want a response in like seconds. Um, I help out with a radio show in the afternoons. Here is well and we get callers all the time. Sometimes there’s, like five callers, and then we take one and the other four just drop off because they don’t want to wait anymore. Sure, I think it’s really important to be able to respond to these people as quick as possible. You don’t wanna wait like 48 hours to respond to someone. That’s an eternity of these days. Um, so helping build that relationship build that accessibility is also something that really humanizes your brand and really goes a long way?

Joe:

18:53

Definitely. Well, I think it’s been an awesome conversation. Really Enjoyed your insights. Uh, what do you think? Looking into your crystal ball? What do you think is the future of experience business? You know, you have a you a unique last name. We could call this the world from, like Adrian Wooldridge, housekeeper, Lesbian. Um what? What’s your woes? Bomb. For the future of experience business,

Vanessa:

19:21

I think it is. Those weren’t want interactions. I know it’s been personalization. It’s been hyper focused on that. Consumer is your entire world. It still is that trying, but I think it’s even more focused these days having a conversation and humanizing your brand. I’m Oh, that’s nothing new but being able to open up and have those private conversations because I think these days people are really afraid of data and hacking and too much information out there. So private conversations should be where your brand is really turning towards utilizing a lot of your data. I know that’s also really scary, but if you do with the correct way, I think people will appreciate it. Finding any eating, carrying those messages through. I’m also thinking completely outside the box like you’re doing something. Now flip it on its side, Try something else out. You know, if it fails, be open to that as a learning experience. Um, things are always evolving, so maybe your brand doesn’t make sense to go on Tic – Tac tryout. If it doesn’t if it flops, you know, now you know it’s really about knowing what your audiences and having those one on one conversations building the relationship. Let’s go back to the core of these one on one conversations and learning more from your audience and just picking up what they have to say, because big data is scary. People are scared about giving their information like there’s an ad that’s following you around. Will be that creepy? Be personable – that could take your brand to the whole another level of market research.

Joe:

20:55

At Adobe we have this digital magazine product, and so I was able to kind of crunch data on all these pretty well known digital magazines and how people were interacting with them. And one interesting trend we saw was the growth in the less social sharing and more message sharing. So people were not necessarily wanting to drop it into Facebook or Twitter or LinkedIn or whatever some mass media product there were more wanting to share it with their mom or their friend or their roommate or their spouse or kids or whatever. So there there was like that growth and more, 1 to 1. So it’s been really interesting to kind of see social evolution and how you know, we had so many social products, and that’s kind of constricted a little bit and gotten a little bit back more to these one toe one conversations. I think that’s really insightful.

Vanessa:

21:54

Yeah. I mean, I see that in my personal life, too. I get direct messages on Instagram where people share different brand things. Give me directly that way. And then we have a conversation there instead of piling onto the comments instead of making everything really public. So, yeah, that’s kind of the evolution of what’s happening right now.

Joe:

22:13

Awesome conversation. Vanessa, thank you for your time today. Uh, love connecting in real life like you said. Um, I’m sure it’s the first of many future conversations on this podcast and outside. But I hope you have a good weekend. And thanks again for joining.

Vanessa:

22:30

Absolutely. This is great. Thanks for having me on.

Joe:

22:37

Thanks for joining the DNA of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0, movement today by getting cloud app screen recorder and screenshot tool the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

Productivity apps – how they can improve your PERSONAL experience at work

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Joe:

00:00

welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from Cloud app, where we discuss how and why creating experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us all right. Today I want to talk about meetings who loves meetings out there. I’m sure that there are so many people that are raising their hands right now that I wouldn’t be able to count. So meetings have definitely a purpose. There’s a lot of value and getting people together, being all the talk through things, set up a plan. Ah, have some outcomes and be able to kind of progress projects coming from a huge company in Adobe. There is also a lot of opportunity to really a line on large projects, so we’d have some campaigns. You know, there were multi $1,000,000 campaigns that had four or five different teams working on different aspects of it, and you really had to kind of sync up every now and then to get value out of that, Um, and make sure that things were lined up. I also really loved one on one meetings that have skipped level meetings where I’d meet with an executive and build that kind of chat through things with them. So meetings have some value. Ah, and sometimes they can take over your day. Ah, maybe you can avoid it. Maybe you can’t. So first, I kind of wanted to talk through a couple of productivity APS Ah, that I’ve been using for the last couple of years. That really helped me when my schedule can sometimes get bogged down by meetings. Definitely has been a lot lighter with cloud Up where I don’t have a CZ many teams or large campaigns with lots of complexity to work on like I did with adobe. But I like to be able to have a good productivity stack to really find success. So a couple that I’ve worked with for a few years, um, first, is slack. I think we a lot of us have jumped on slack and been able to kind of find value there. Ah, there’s a lot of opportunity to really learn, um, how to communicate with people. I think it’s great for connect connecting remote teams at Adobe. I worked in the Utah office, and a lot of my team was in at headquarters in San Jose. So slack provider. Really fun and formal way to stay connected and really learn from each other and follow up on projects. I also love since college, my undergrad and grad school. I guess grad school most was G sweet. So Google Doc school, she’d school slides. Uh, those have been super valuable to collaborate on. So if you have, you know, projects that really need a bunch of different eyes on them Google docks has been a great way to connect on those things. Uh, I usually like to end things in, uh, the Microsoft Suite s so I can do a little bit more editing and definitely using Excel for what I’m doing analysis. But G sweet provides a nice starting point for those things. One of my favorite things that I’ve done recently to G suite is ah, one on ones on Google docks. So really looking at Google docks. And I can look back at previous week to see what we talked about, kind of what people’s tasks are and helps me to align my mind to everything that’s kind of going on. And, uh, you know, if really, if you’re able to write down things like that and and be proactive. Then you’re able To, stay on task and get more done. So G suite has been great. Um, one that have recently been testing out is called calendar dot com, which is pretty cool. It’s ah, run by a friend of mine named John Rampton, and callen, dr dot com provides some really great data on your calendar. So it sinks with your calendar, and it will show you some really interesting people. Analytics on nohow. How ah, long are your 15 or you’re our meetings actually going Can you cut those back? Where can you kind of optimize your calendar? Lots of cool stuff going on with calendar dot com. That’s when I really enjoyed um, I’ve had this in my stack for awhile and loved it so much that I joined the company. Ah, that’s cloud up. So I’ve been using it for probably a year and 1/2 to 2 years. Uh, clot up is a screenshot screen recording and give creation tool that provides, you know, instant business communication. Visually. So pretty cool that you can create these visual tools visual collateral that links to slack and other work flows. Ah, I found it. A really useful use case for marketing was connecting with design teams. So at Adobe, why do these really long demand? Gen reports Ah, for this adobe digital insights team that we called it and these demanding reports, uh, we’d have these long back and forth e mails with marked up P D EFS going back and forth to make it right. And eventually I started using cloud app to record myself talking through the doc. Ah, and I found it was easier way too express myself. Uh, auditory lee visually versus writing something down. And it was a way to skip a meeting. And I’ve been using cloud up to skip meetings ever since, Ah, where I could just say, Hey, can I just explain this to you in a video and send it on slack versus, like, someone calling me or or setting up a 15 minute meeting? So it’s been really valuable there. Ah, to do ist is when I’ve loved as well. To do it is kind of like a to do list app both Web based and on your phone. Uh, and I started using that cause at the end of the night and I know a lot of other people who have this I would always come up with new thoughts right before I fell asleep. S o, I have a notebook by my bed. I’ll write those things down and and kind of process in the next day. And to do list was kind of like is my next step. So I take things from my notebook. I’ll put it in to do list and kind of make it a task list for myself. And I can refer back to those ideas and decide if I want to flush them out a little bit more or not. Uh, the other thing that I picked up here at cloud up is a sauna. Um, so on my team, Maile, wait is in a asana ninja. And so I’ve learned a lot from her. Ah, on how to one assigned tasks to my team, Um, add priority and and really crank through things that way and also tasked to myself. So it really helps me to know what I need to focus on what I need to get better on and what for a longer term in short term projects where I’m kind of at war my progresses. So Asana has been great for that. Um, there’s ah, interesting stat from a survey that cloud up is gonna be releasing in a couple weeks that 40% of office workers spend three more three or more hours a day in meetings. So ah, you know, back to my first point for those people that are kind of crushed by meetings, these productivity app skin one kind of help you relieve some of that if you’re able to get work done quicker and to hopefully you know, tools like calendar dot com can really help you to know, um, how to optimize your calendar and another kind of thing I’ve learned on and have been practicing for a while and and got reinforced, Um, the value of it with a podcast they did with near A All a couple weeks ago. He’s the New York Times best selling author of Hooked and just Came out in distractible. Um, we did on the d n A and experience podcast from cloud up. We talked about time blocking and really creating moments in your calendar. Ah, you know, people say that they don’t have time for anything. But, ah, if you, you know, block out time for things, you’ll find ways to make it happen. So each day I like to have, ah, a couple of hours, ideally of productivity time. And that’s where I’m kind of secluded. I’ll go off Ah, away from kind of all the noise of the office and open my turn off all my notifications and really just kind of, um, zone into what I need to focus on for that day. And I’ve found that that’s really a great way for me to, um, one feel like I’ve fully accomplished something and been proactive and not just reactive for the day. Um and also just know that I I checked some major things off that I needed to do that day. So that kind of links back to asana to do ist and those other things. So I’m I’m loving this collaboration productivity mindset that the world is kind of moving to right now. I think remote work is a big piece of that where it requires you to need to connect on different mediums excited to kind of be a part of cloud up. That is a piece of that and how visuals can really connect people and reduce meeting needs. Um, but I think those productivity apps really cool. And I hope that people are commenting and getting giving feedback on maps that you’re using, and I look forward to hearing about that and checking those out. Uh, and I hope that what I kind of went through today on my stack and what we’ve kind of been using here it cloud up is valuable for you. So go ahead and check out, um, cloud up to do ist asana calendar dot com g sweet and slack if you haven’t already and comment or respond with any other APS that you’re using in your stack, and I look forward to checking those out. Thank you. Have a good day. Thanks for joining the D. N A. Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud up the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable, videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud up dot com. Thank you. We look forward to seeing you next time.

The ultimate remote work guidebook to improve your employees experience

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Joe:

00:00

welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from cloud app where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning, everyone. I am excited today to talk about remote work. It’s something that I’ve been writing about quite a bit recently and thought it would be kind of fun to share in a different medium through linked in live and through podcast form. Um so hopefully some tips today that will share from either research that I’ve done for articles I put up for an NCO and next week for Qualtrics and Dribble and some other places, um, will provide some value, um, through things that I’ve learned along the way. So remote work is growing. We actually have a report coming out next week from Cloud app called this State of Collaboration. Um, I’m not gonna tell you some of the stats from there, but the majority of a couple of up and coming generations are working remotely at least once a week. Um so it’s growing. People find some value in staying home, having little more flexibility not having sitting traffic, Um, maybe living further outside the city if you’re in San Francisco or New York or somewhere where it’s just crazy, expensive to live, um, so remote work is growing, especially with the younger demographics. And so it’s something that needs to be kind of recognized and, um balanced in a way to find success with it. So today I want to talk about, you know, remote work, how it can relate to again, creating a good customer experience for your employees who are kind of your internal customers, Um, and making sure that you’re being able to get the right talent that confined success with rope remote work. So a couple of things I’ve kind of learned along the way is, um, really establishing how you’re going to communicate with each other. Um, so you wanna have kind of a nice balance of, ah, zoom interactions, um, interactions over slack and also making sure you’re finding ways to match up on time zone. Ah, when I was with Adobe, I managed some resource is in Ah, India and also in eight other a pack regions in Europe, and sometimes it was challenging, you know, to find it a time that we could all meet up. Ah, India, especially, was really hard. Um, is like, 12 hours ahead of Utah. And so someone was sacrificing being either up early or out late, um, on a call. So what we found is is we could use tools like cloud app to record videos of ourselves kind of talking through projects or Dex or documents and sending those along. Um, And then when our work days were kind of opposite, we could look at those videos and then respond, um, and connect that way, s so that was that was really helpful to use tools like like cloud happens and slack and and kind of communicating that way. Um, also making sure you find the correct collaborative app stack. So there’s tons of great collaborative tools out there. Ah, that are really evolving and focused around connecting remote workers. Um, there’s like, ah, some that are kind of in my stack that I talked about last week were aSana slack cloud app, um, calendar. Uh, there’s definitely, like tools like trail Oh that people use. You can use, um, other other tools to kind of connect visually. Uh, those are really gonna be helpful in in connecting you and your remote workforce. Um, the other thing with communication and collaboration is is really kind of establishing what you hope to find success with. Um, so I found it was good to establish kind of rules for engagement. So, um, you know, something wasn’t super important. You could send over an email. Ah, and those would, you know, get engaged with, ah, once a day or or every other day. Um, if it was little more informal or kind of just like, Hey, I just need your quick opinion on this slack can be a great tool for that to be able to connect. And then, um if it’s like, hey, I need your help, like, immediately. You know, text message. To get a straight channel to someone can be really helpful. So establishing those rules of engagement, you know, everyone could be different and establish how you want to communicate with each other. But I found that that is helpful, um, to find ways to communicate back and forth. Um, and you each kind of know what to expect from, ah a email or text message or slack message. Um, when you’re in that kind of frame set. So Ah, the other thing is, in person visits, I think a really crucial. Um, Imagine, uh, you know, Rocky four when Adrian goes and visits Rocky when he’s training in Russia and how, right before that training, seen it gets kind of amped up. Um, that he, you know, has we can call Adrian his boss. Ah, there with him. So there’s really energy that comes when you’re connecting in real life with each other. And I think in person meetings, even in the world of zoom and cloud app and slack, um could be really valuable to connect people. So I think team off sites once a year or, you know, if you’re a little closer, like, uh, I manage some people that were in the Bay Area and so I was able to just jump on a plane, um, every 6 to 8 weeks or so and kind of just hang out together. Ah, here a cloud up. We have two major offices, one in the Bay Area and one here in Utah. And so, um, Scott Smith, our CEO and and Jason Toy R C 00 Based in the Bay Area come out here to Utah. Uh, once a month or every other month, can I can connect with here people here in the Utah office, and I’ll go out there occasionally as well to connect in real life. So building those relationships is helpful, Um, and finding that mix of in person email, text and communications that really fit in with how your, um, time zone commitments are can be helpful and really create a good personal experience and customer experience for your internal employees who are also, you know, big customers and the lifeblood of the company. Um, the next thing that I was kind of thinking about is, um, creating informal relationships. So I think it’s good to not always be talking about work. Slack definitely provides a great opportunity to, um, you know, the modern workplace office cooler, the water cooler where you can kind of just connect with people. Um, if you find someone that you like you both like sports or civic team, you can talk about that informally or, you know, TV series or whatever you’ve connected with your team members on. Ah, that could be a great way to connect um, informally. And also, you know, fine things to bring bring people together across the company. So we have a lot of, uh, most of our work force here. Cloud up his remote, and so we’ve done a few things like, um, we have done some in person meetings last year. There was, ah, big offsite. Um, that we all kind of met up this. That was before I came to the company, but brought everybody together, which was great. And then we also try and just do random, you know, contests that could bring us together as a team, like March madness or, ah, fantasy football or, you know, sports related things. Or you can kind of connect on a TV series or things like that. But those little, ah connection points that are informal can be kind of fun. Banter for slack can be a great way to really connect with one another. Um, and especially bring in those people that are remote that may feel a little desk disconnected from headquarters to be able to find that that success Um, one thing that I, uh, appreciated at Adobe was, um, was the support of remote work. Ah, and kind of, you know, lots of tools and trainings on how to manage those things. So the next thing is is really did this research tips and tricks. There’s lots of great articles and content out there. Um, that can really that can really help you to learn how to manage that remote team and create the best experience possible. Um, I think the true success is when if you’re managing a remote employee that you recognize that it’s completely different than managing someone next to you. So you have to put in a little extra effort to connect with them, to make sure that they’re they’re feeling appreciated and feeling like a part of the team. Um 01 other thing I’d like to do at Adobe when I had some remote people, it and or if I had, like, a mixture of remote and in person people that were kind of next to me is I would, um, separate out the medium so or put everybody on the same plane. So if you’ve ever been remote working from home and you dial in the like a conference room call and everyone’s kind of chatting and brainstorming something And then you try and, like, chime in from the phone, it always feels a little awkward, a little disconnected. Um, it’s hard to like, you know, force your opinion in there when other people are talking about our next to each other. So I like to put everyone on the same medium with a zoom call. Um, even if we had, you know, three or four people in the same office, um, and one person remote, I’d have us all kind of dialing from a zoom call, and that would make us all kind of on the same plane. And we saved those, you know, in person team meetings to being in person so that that worked out really well and was kind of, ah, fun thing to test out so remote work tips of the day. Um, establish your communication goals and how you’re gonna how you’re gonna talk to each other. Rules of engagement for that fine collaboration tools that can help you find success. Um, collaborate visually when possible with zoom, cloud app screen recroder, screenshot tool, and GIFMaker and other tools that can help you connect visually and, um, connect informally as much as possible and also scheduled those in person meetings to have the Adrian Rocky effect. So I hope those are helpful in creating that experience for your employees and for yourself. If you’re working remote and look for the State of Collaboration report next week that I’ll be chatting about, um, some of the stats on remote work and how people are preferring to communicate. Hope you have a good weekend, and we will talk soon. Thanks. Thanks for joining the D. N A. Of an experienced podcast way. Hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

Reviewing stats around the Future of Work from the State of Collaboration report from CloudApp

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Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from cloud app where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Hello, everyone. I am excited to go through the State of Collaboration report from cloud app today. Um, I was hoping to be able to share my screen, but I’m just going to kind of share some of the stats and talk through that with you today. So we did a survey of 1000 U. S. Office workers aged 18 to 60 and we wanted to find out really what, um, people were feeling about collaboration about remote work and looks a generational differences and find out how they want to collaborate, how to create some tips to integrate into your business from these results. So some of the key insights is we found that majority of Gen. Z and Millennials are working remotely each week. That could be a CZ little as once a week, half the time full time. But there’s a lot of kind of emerging generations, um, that are now becoming a majority of the work force that are choosing to work from home, um, for various reasons, either there away from the mother ship and headquarters, and just live in a different location, choosing to live away from just crazy, expensive places like the Bay Area or New York, living a little further away from those places and maybe commuting in a couple of days a week but working from home and then also just flexibility. There’s a lot of focus on work, life, balance and mindfulness on wanting to be healthy and have a longer career. And so these groups are focusing on ways to do that by working from home occasionally, Um, and really trying to find that that that balance way also found that one in four office workers in general in the in the entire span is working from home at least half the time. So, um, you know, that brings up some interesting challenges when you’re going through remote work. And I’ve talked about a couple of times on these live broadcasts and also on a podcast that Iran called the DNA of an experience about ways to engage with remote workers. There’s tools out there, like obviously, Zoom who I P O this year. Cloud app. Eyes ah, instant business communication tool that allows connection with remote workers through the creation of videos, screenshots and GiFs. There’s tools like Air Table for Calendar uh, kind of shared calendar things. Asana for tasks, lots of different tools out there to enable you obviously slack as well. Which is another stat we looked at was Gen Z office workers love slack on Gen Xers are the ones who are all in on video. So the majority of those kind of groups they showed the highest year of visits to or affinity for those tools. So, um, that slack with the younger generation is kind of ah, really informal way to communicate incorporates gifts and emojis in kind of a fun way, which is why it’s grasp onto them. And Gen Xers was actually a little surprising with how they were all in on video. I was expecting that to be maybe more millennial or gen z generations. Um, but Gen Xers have jumped in on video conferencing more than 12 Office workers say they would collaborate more done visually, So, uh, not just remote workers, but everyone in the office is looking for ways to connect differently and more visually. So lots of, um you old adages around pictures worth 1000 words. So what’s a video worth these ways to communicate differently can really connect audiences in a faster, more efficient way. Um, I’ve loved using, uh, zoom to connect with, uh, people that I’ve managed both. When I was with adobe and hear it cloud app when we’re not in the office or or, you know, we cloud app have, a, Utah office but our headquarters in the Bay Area. So we connect a lot on Zoom and also use our own tool cloud app to send videos of ourselves kind of talking through a deck or, um, a design or something where we can connect without necessarily having to meet. So eliminating those meetings, eliminating long e mails where you’re trying to explain something, could be really helpful and can help kind of jump in on that visual collaboration. The next one was found that more than 60% excuse me of Gen Z and Millennials said they would collaborate. More done visually, so is one and two for the entire sampled and 60% for Gen. Z millennials so a little bit higher than the base sample. So it’s showing that this new emerging generation is two generations are looking for different ways to collaborate. They’re recognizing the ways that visual things can improve the connection and make things a little bit faster and maybe save them some time. Um, in the kind of last key insight. And then there’s 20 other stats in this report that I’m not gonna talk about. But 94% of office workers list team collaboration is top priority. So business is definitely recognize the need for, ah, focus on collaboration, enabling teams with these tools to be able to help them collaborate properly and also really get head of remote work. Um, and kind of the shift there’d the gig economy where we may not have these centralized offices. So I wrote a guest post for Qualtrics that’s going live this week, and one of the things was talking about, um, I mentioned you know, these things. Big tech tech companies. I’ve had a lot of friends at Google and Facebook, and, uh, I always went through Adobe. And so these big tech companies have these massive headquarters with all these cool amenities and a really fun, you know, culture and everything and really built to keep the people in the office. And I have to leave so you can eat there. You can get your laundry done. There’s gyms and things like that. But is that, uh is the remote future where people are more hanging out at home and companies are enabling them to be able to work from home or work remotely? If if they’re not at headquarters, is that more of the future of business in the future of work? So, uh, this report was a lot of fun to put together, Um, and kind of goes back thio some things I’ve been known for in the past, and I look forward to kind of providing more of this in the future. Um, we’re looking to do kind of one on the state of productivity. Um may dive deeper into the remote work as well. And I had some good feedback on the last link in live that was kind of talking about remote work and had some good comments on how people were, uh, staying productive and connecting. Um, I think one of the things with remote work is throwing out the door. Any conceptions you had previously. If working in office, those things you know, may those things come naturally, like culture and connection when you have people around you. But when you’re working remotely, you really need to kind of see those things out. So finding ways to connect on slack through informal means, like I talked about in the last live and finding ways to connect as a team, definitely looking for ways to become, um, meet in person at least at least once a year, if not more if possible, and building those kind of side relationships so those things can fuel slack conversations and in connection. And then you’ll find that projects go smoother. I know when I was, I worked in the Adobe Utah office, and so that’s obviously away from headquarters in San Jose. And I always found that when I would hit a roadblock with a project if I flew out to headquarters and met with the person, if especially it was our first time meeting. Just having that little face to face interaction really provided a lot of a lot of benefit on to get help from both of us. Um, so take a look at the report. You can find it on get cloud up dot com slash blog. It’ll just be there on the featured post. You can also find it on my Twitter account at Jodi. Marty. It’ll be the pin tweet after this and apologies we for kind of a blank background on the office here. We just moved into a new space in Utah and so it’s ah kind of plane, but I’m looking forward to talking again soon. Thank you and have a good rest of the day. Thanks for joining the DNA of an experienced podcast way. Hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and a fancy experience. You create your customer, join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app the instant business communication tool used to create shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time

5 keys to Creating a Demand Gen Report

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Joe:

00:00

welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from Cloud App where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important and the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us behind the scenes of the State of Collaboration report. So he did this report. Did this report called the State of Collaboration Q 3 2019 And I’ve been doing this quite a bit during these longer formed imagine pieces over the last decade or so with Adobe and cloud app. So I thought it would be cool. To, maybe share some of the tips I’ve learned long way of how to create those things so I created just five keys that I want to go over. Um, really kind of the start is hypothesizing and strategizing What type of piece of content you want to create. So with this State of Collaboration report that we created, I wanted to, you know, think about both selfishly, from a business perspective, what we could kind of gain from a survey on helping build our strategy from consumers. Um and then also just create some thought leadership, you know, collaboration is kind of a hot topic. Right now, it’s about a $16 billion industry. Leaders like Slack and Zoom are out there kind of creating waves. And so, uh, when I was putting together this survey, um, the questions all kind of tailored around what I really wanted to see in collaboration. So I put the questions together. There was around 10 of them and kind of hypothesized what I expected to see. So, um, the questions were anywhere from like, how do you prefer to collaborate with your co workers? How often are you working from home things like that around remote work in collaboration. And I was expecting to see, you know, a big growth and remote work eyes expecting to see some generational differences between baby boomers and Gen Z as an example. And I was expecting to see, um, certain things about how people are kind of using different tools in the modern workplace. And so that was kind of leading my hypothesis in these creating these questions on the survey. So then we feel that survey and it was too 1000 U. S office workers ages 18 to 60. So you kind of set up your methodology, you know, If you want to just focus on one demographic, you can. I wanted to have kind of, ah, lot of differences and demographics to be able to see how things were separate and kind of See how Gen z specifically and millennials differed from Gen X and Baby Boomer. So we filled its survey and, um, the questions, you know, we’re all guilty of being around that hypothesis. And then you also kind of need to think about, uh what? The purpose of of what you’re doing is in the end. So my purpose again, I mentioned Was to be able to have, um, be able to have results that could drive our strategy and then also results so we could kind of share for thought leadership and demand gin. Um, so I thought about those ahead of time and then have a, you know, a key theme or a purpose. So the key theme for me was collaboration remote work and pairing those two things together and really trying to find a happy medium of where we’re going in the future, work in modern workplace, then the fun part, the analyzing the data. So if you feel the survey through Qualtrics or Surveymonkey or, um, you know, any other survey service, they’re gonna kind of just give you back a dump of data. Um, and really, it’s up to you to kind of come up with something creative from it. So, uh, you know, whether you like to use pivot tables or sequel, um, or whatever kind of your tool choices. I was mostly in excel using pivot tables and kind of coming up with the results. Um, but the data, you know, that that comes back from those people wasn’t isn’t always the most exciting. So you need to kind of create a story with it. So, um, if you go to my report that I created, it’s on get cloud up dot com, Um, under R e book section, you’ll see that kind of I created kind of some key insights and story lines from it so bubbling up. You know, any time you can have a generational difference, it’s usually pretty exciting to share. So I found that the majority of Gen. Z works remotely each week. One in four office workers work from home at least half the time Gen Z office workers love slack most, and Gen Xers are actually all in on video, which was actually a little surprising. I would expected Gen Z and millennials to be a little higher on video. More than one in two office workers say they would collaborate more done visually, with 60% of Gen Z and Millennials, so they would collaborate more done visually. And then 94% of office workers said team collaboration is top priority for them. So those were kind of the story lines that I bubbled up. Um, the actual report has now 50 insights or so in it, and I bubbled up probably 6 to 10 of those to make it press worthy and a little more digestible. And then I also turned each of those six into, um, social share Able charts. So that’s kind of the next piece is created. Really, Um, I like to call it content efficiency, So you start with a really high level demand in peace on that feeds into some block posts. It feeds into some social tidbit feeds into demand Gens that you can do on different sources linked in, or Facebook or Google and generate leads from that and it’s really all from one piece of content. So, uh, love putting these, like, longer form demand in pieces together, my five keys again are kind of hypothesized the results that you wanted to see on that Hopefully, you know, some of your hypotheses match up with actual results. Um, create kind of the questions that you are hoping to see fit in with your hypothesis ahead of time and what you expect to see questions that feed into what you might expect, Uh, have your key themes have a central purpose. So, um, if someone’s doing your survey or you wanna have kind of a ski theme within that survey, analyze the data and then lastly, um, you know, make lots of pieces from that one kind of data analysis. So research is really fun to do. It can produce a lot of great content and can have really long, uh, long reach and longevity as far as people referencing data. So, um, look to do demand in pieces longer, form pieces of content and definitely check out the collaboration report that I put together for cloud up. Um, I’ll linked to it in the comments section, um of everything that I’m releasing this onto. So take a look at the collaboration report on. Hopefully that will kind of inspire you to lead some future research for your company in the future. Have a great day and we will talk soon. Thank you. Thanks for joining the DNA Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collabaration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.

Turning your fanbase into a raving community

CloudApp text in black with speech bubble/cloud in various shades of blue

Joe:

00:00

Welcome to the DNA and experience podcast from Cloud App, where we discuss how and why creating an experience is so important in the psychology behind what makes an experience so great. Thanks for joining us. Good morning. I wanted to go through a couple of things that I’m excited about today. For cloud app, we announced a community page that is a great way to kind of bring in all the three million plus users that we have a cloud app into one community where we can share each other’s use cases, provide feedback on, really give our customers a voice where they can kind of showcase the work, that they’re doing a cloud app. And as I’m kind of releasing this community page this morning on our website on get cloud app dot com, here’s kind of ah view of it. I wanted to go through kind of the experience of that can create for a customer. So I learned a lot from this. Um, it was a couple years ago when Adobe acquired Magenta. Uh, I was kind of leading some research on that acquisition and kind of some of the on boarding team, and we uncovered just a massive community that Magenta had created, which was really cool. It’s just a really raving fan base. And a lot of it was from creating these kind of community pages, forums and other places where people could provide feedback, could be featured and kind of have their work shown. And so I wanted to kind of bring that cloud app because I thought it would be a fun way to bring us all together in this kind of collaboration. 2.0, movement. Give our people a chance to kind of build their personal brand and how they’re kind of using things of their company, but also to help each other out. So, um, I know when I was kind of using cloud app at Adobe is kind of looking for different use cases, different ways that I could use it and kind of thinking through new ways to get things done. Um, and so that’s kind of what will we’ll see with this community page at cloud app. So as we were kind of developing it, I wanted to have three kind of different pillars to it. So the 1st 1 is use cases from you. The customer. So it’s looking at people that are actually using products day in, day out. At at no large companies, About 53% of the Fortune 500 use cloud app and bringing kind of their uses to the very home page. So when you look at it on, get cloud app dot com, you’ll see just kind of some beautiful tile setups. Um, I also kind of pulled from my friends over to Adobe Spark and how they run their community page, where it’s just really visual and ties in nicely to their product, which is a visual product. And then I wanted to showcase a bunch of use case pages we’ve created internally that show various things from you know, the free screen. 1/4 options to what you get from a pro plan to how to embed an image, an email or answer something through customer support. Tips for remote workers, lots of different things on then The last one is how to use the Internet. So this is kind of a more high level piece where we use cloud app to show tutorials on how to use the Internet, various things from how to set up a Gmail account to Twitter account to how to update your notifications for the Catalina update with Mac always just kind of looking through things that people are searching for, um, on how to do certain things on the Internet. And we’re providing videos and pages on how to actually do those, obviously, all recorded with cloud app. So the hope is, um and actually that’s how to use The Internet is also inspired by lots of people who get constant questions from family members or someone in your sphere asking you how to do things. You could just record a quick video yourself or find it on this. How to use the Internet page and send in the video of how to do certain things. Um, so there is a form that you can fill out if you’d like to feature something from cloud app that you’ve created and will kind of create a page, we’ll show your picture and provide you a link to your Lincoln and Twitter Facebook profile whatever you want to kind of build up and bring more people into our community. So the goal here is really to provide kind of harness this movement, this large fan base that we have and bring them into, Um, you know what we’re trying to accomplish here? Cloud out. So I think that’s a big piece of a community. Page is you really want to have it being open back and forth communication so bilateral communication, Um, so that you can get that feedback. You can create that connection and really feel like, um, the people feel like they’re kind of leading the company. Uh, definitely. At a start up, you know, you wanna have customer feedback, lead product and really have focus on customers so that you can, um, keep providing value to them, keep growing that loyalty from them. And that’s what we’re really trying to do is, you know, show our customers how much we love them and appreciate them. How much how passionate we are about kind of leading the modern workplace and remote work and connecting, you know, new asynchronous communication channels. Through a report we ran called the State of Collaboration, we found that, uh, close to 60% of millennials and Gen z generations are working from home or remotely most of the week. So, you know we want to connect with those groups and also, you know, everyone else. That’s kind of in the workforce now and provide them ways that they can communicate visually. So this community page is going to really harness, um, the power of learning from others and kind of making everyone that’s using our product of thought leader. And we’re excited about kind of the opportunity here. So kind of some of my initial findings definitely researched a lot about companies I respect and how they’ve kind of run their community pages had some experience through Adobe and and prior to that kind of setting up community opportunities, finding ways that people can kind of showcase their products or their, uh, their projects and how they’re kind of using your product. Um, and really finding more connection points between the company and the community. You know, we really want to feel like we’ve got this huge fan base that we think we can draw from and help us grow. Um, and so we want to connect with those three million people as often as possible. Um, so check out the community page if you’re a fan of cloud app or if you’re kind of just wondering how to potentially grow your business or connect with your customer base A little bit more community could be a great way to do that on really, enabling people, too. Use your product in lots of different ways. Oh, the other thing I loved is there is this is kind of based around a stat that’s 68% of people prefer a short video to learn about a product. So, um, you know, that’s a piece of cloud app where kind of providing a lot of how to videos on how to use the product in lots of different ways. So the community pages up. Check out the use cases from you. It’s it’s initially filled out by people here. Internally, it cloud app there, all power users. But we’ll be doing outreach this week and over the next several months to kind of fill that out with power users. And then there’s use cases from us, which is page is provided from our company on use cases and then how to use the Internet. So check those three things out. Um, definitely fill out the form and submit your use case, and we’ll be in touch on how to kind of expand that out feature you and we’re looking forward to kind of growing our community and again saying thank you to our three million plus user base of cloud app. So thank you and have a great day. Thinks thanks for joining the DNA Of an experienced podcast. We hope you learn something that will help improve your collaboration and enhance the experience you create for your customer. Join the collaboration 2.0 movement today by getting cloud app; the instant business communication tool used to create instantly shareable videos, screenshots and GiFs perfect for both internal and external communication. Get started for free at www dot get cloud app dot com. Thank you. Look forward to seeing you next time.